Skip to main content

Full text of "The war of the rebellion: a compilation of the official records of the Union and Confederate armies"

See other formats


4 



■ 



t 



01 



in 



darrrspondenc 



C 



jsr OUN -^ 



^-4CA.^ 



■■^7 




Cornell University 
Library 



The original of this bool< is in 
the Cornell University Library. 

There are no known copyright restrictions in 
the United States on the use of the text. 



http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924077699795 



Production Note 

Cornell University Library 
produced this volume to preserve 
the informational content of the 
deteriorated original. The best 
available copy of the original has 
been used to create this digital 
copy. It was scanned bitonally at 
600 dots per inch resolution and 
compressed prior to storage using 
ITU Group 4 compression. 
Conversion of this material to 
digital files was supported by the 
Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. 
Digital file copyright by Cornell 
University Library 1995. 

This volume has been scanned 
as part of The Making of America 
Project, a cooperative endeavor 
undertaken to preserve and enhance 
access to historical material from 
the nineteenth century. 



The digital data "were used to 
(reote Cornell's replacement 
volume on paper that meets 
AMSIStondordZ39.48-1992. 



THE 



WAR OF THE REBELLiON: 

A COMPILATION OF THE 
OFFICIAL RECORDS 

OP THE 

DNION AND CONFEDERATE ARMIES. 



FRBPABED BT 

The late Lieut. Col. ROBERT IT.^COTT, Third IT. S. Artillery- 

PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF 

The Hon. REDFIBLD PROCTOR, Secretary of TVar, 

BY 

Maj. GEORGE B. DAVIS, U. S. A., 
Me. LESLIE J. PERRY, 
Me. JOSEPH W. KIRKLEY, 

Board of Publication. 



8EEIES I— VOLUME XXXV— IN TWO PAETS. 
PART II-CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 



washi:ngton: 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE. 
1891. 



J- 



36''?b6' 



CORNELL 
UNIVER£ITY| 

LIBRAR\V' 



I 



I>^RT II-VOL. XXXV. 



CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING 
TO OPERATIONS IN SOUTH CAROLINA AND FLORIDA 
AND ON THE GEORGIA COAST, FROM MARCH 1 TO 
NOVEMBER 13, 1864.* 

tjnion correspondence!, etc. 

Hdqrs. District op Florida, Dept. of the South, - 

Jacksonville, Fla., March 2, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. J. W. Turner, 

Chief of Staff and Artillery, Dept. of the South : 

General : A deserter came from Lake City yesterday, who left 
there on February 39, and who is apparently a man of very clear and 
sound judgment. He was employed at the railroad at Lake City, 
and -had ample means of observation. He states that immediately 
after the battle of Olustee (Saturday, February 30), twelve cars 
loaded exclusively with Confederate wounded came to Lake City. 
On Sunday, 8 a. m., seven more arrived, and at 4 p. m., eight ad- 
ditional. There was one passenger car, the rest box and platform. 
The passenger contained at least 00 wounded, and the remainder 
averaged 40 each, for all were crowded to their fullest extent. He 
estimated the wounded at the time at about 1,000. Our own wounded 
were taken to Tallahassee, so far as they could be moved safely; the 
remainder to Lake City, where the citizens generally showed them 
every kindness, cooking for them and paying them all the attention 
in their power. It is proper to add that an application was made to 
the general commanding Confederate forces to parole our wounded, 
which was refused. Copies of the communications accompany this, f 

Another deserter states that he was told at Lake City, by the medi- 
cal officer in charge of the hospitals there, that over 300 Confederate^ 
had been killed and died from their wounds, and a deserter this 
moment arrived states that he was on the field of Olustee after the 
action ; that the belief and report among the burial parties (of whom 
he asked the injEormation) was that 350 Confederates were left dead 
and that about 1,000 were killed and wounded. And every report 
that is received goes to show that it has been for them one of the 
severest engagements of the war. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

T. SEYMOUR, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 

*For Correspondence, &c., from January 1 to February 29, 1864, see Part I. 
tSee Part I, pp. 339, 330. 

(3) 



[Cbap. xuvxl 

Headquarters District of West Florida, 

Barrancas, March 4, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. Charles P. Stone, 

Chief of Staff, Department of the Gulf: 

General : I have the honor to submit, in connection with my 
report of February 23,* No. 86, the following additional information 
in regard to affairs in my neighborhood, received from refugees arid 
deserters : 

There are at present 13,000 to 15,000 rebel troops at Mobile, includ- 
ing those who fell back from Meridian, with about 1,000 cavalry. 
General Maury was urging non-combatants to leave the city at once. 
General Polk's men decline to fight longer in Mississippi, and are 
deserting in large numbers. The trains on the Mobile and Ohio 
Railroad are only ninning 33 miles beyond the city to a place called 
Citronelle. The people of Mobile seem to be prepared to surrender 
as soon as the railroad communication with Montgomery is cut off. 
The rebel iron ram Tennessee succeeded in getting over the Dog 
River Bar in the Mobile Harbor, and as it becomes thus one of the 
possibilities in prospect that this formidable vessel, aided by others 
of similar po:yer, may pass our blockading fleet and attempt an 
entrance into the Pensacola Harbor, I issued, at the 'suggestion of 
Admiral Farragut, the inclosed Special Orders, No. 46, directing the 
comnjanders of Forts Pickens and Barrancas to prevent the entrance 
of any vessel at night until its character is satisfactorily ascertained, 
requesting at the same time Commodore Smith, commanding the 
navyryard, and Captain Gibson, senior officer afloat here, to secure 
for the two ports a seasonable information of the approach of any 
vessel of suspicious appearance. 

In the rebel Camp Gonzales, 15 miles above Pensacola, there were 
on the 1st instant not more than 250 to 300 infantry (Tennessee 
troops) and 100 cavalry, but th« garrison at Pollard was increased 
last Sunday to 3,000 in anticipation of a raid from here on the Mo- 
bile and Montgomery Railroad. 

The Tennessee troops stationed at the camp between Blackwater 
and Escambia Rivers nave been relieved again by Mississippi troops, 
paroled at Vicksburg. Their officers say they are exchanged. 

Col. W. Miller, of the rebel conscript bureau for the Southern 
District of Florida and Alabama, intends to make a raid on East 
Bay with 300 cavalry, for the purpose of gathering up all deserters 
and refugees secreted in the woods and abandoned farms, and I have 
no means to prevent it. Union sympathizers in Florida and Ala- 
bama are organizing in bodies to meet the rebel cavalry parties who 
. infest the country. 

The Montgomery Daily Advertiser, of February 20, admits that 
100 of those men (called tories) entered Pikeville, Ala., on the 11th 
of February, killing, wounding, and capturing several of the Coi^ 
federate garrison. 

Refugees and deserters are continually coming into" our lines, 
although the facilities I can afford are very limited. 

The number of the Florida recruits has already reached 3Q0, but 
they have no horses, no arms, and no equipments, although proper 
requisitions were forwarded in time to department headquarters. 
Neither have I funds to pay the first installment of $25 of the regu- 
lar bounty, and I would "respectfully refer to my application for 
such funds submitted on January 21, Sub-No. 38. 

~~ *SeePartI, p. 489. " ' 



Chap. XLVU] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — TTNION. 5 

One of the small expeditions started from here on the schooner 
Buchanan up the Santa Rosa Sound and Choctawhatchee Bay to 
Point Washington, Washin^on County, Fla., to collect recruits, 
met, after some success, with a reverse, the 2 officers concerned 
having exceeded my distinct written orders. 

I beg to inclose copy of my instructions given to Captain Gallo- 
way, recruiting officer, authorizing him to receive those officers and 
men of the Confederate army who had expressed through delegates 
the desire to return to the old flag as friends ; also copy of special 
order * to Lieutenant Ross, Seventh Vermont Volunteers, directing 
him to proceed to and encamp at Washington Point, at the head of 
Choctawhatchee Bay, with his company and receive, protect, and 
bring down to Barrancas all refugees willing to join the Florida 
cavalry, distinctly enjoining him to use all precautions necessary in 
face of the enemy and be vigilant day and night. But the eager- 
ness of those officers to accomplish brilliant success by daring deeds 
induced them to penetrate, with the small force of 17 men of the 
Seventh Vermont and some refugees, about 15 miles into the enemy's 
country to capture Floyd's rebel company of infantry, encamped at 
Boydton's Bluff on the Choctawhatchee River. They succeeded.in 
surprising and capturing, on the night of the 8th of February, the 
whole company, numbering 50 men and 3 commissioned officers, with 
all their arms and supplies. But on their return to Washington 
Point on the following morning they were overtaken by two com- 
panies of rebel cavalry under Captains Jeter and Milton, wlio retook 
the captured rebel company, with Lieutenant Ross and 11 men of 
the Seventh Vermont Infantry and Captain Galloway, with 5 of the 
refugees who accompanied the party, f The inclosed Montgqmery 
paper gives a fair statement of the affair. A full report with list 
of officers and men taken will be forwarded by the next steamer. 

At present I have a recruiting officer on the extreme end of the 
Santa 'Rosa Island, with facilities to bring refugees across East Pass 
and the sound, as well as down from Washington Point. 

In regard to movements of Federal troops it is reported from 
rebel sources that Sherman has destroyed the Mobile and Ohio Rail- 
road, with a large additional amount of rebel property, without 
much interference from Confederate troops ; that Grant and John- 
ston have been engaged heavily at Dalton, and that a portion of 
Gillmore's command, after siiccessfully landing in East Florida, on 
the Saint John's River, at Jacksonville, has advanced toward Lake 
City, on the Florida, Atlantic and Gulf Central Railroad, which 
extends from Jacksonville through Tallahassee to Quincy. 

Thus, it seems that Union forces of four departments, the Gulf, 
Tennessee, Cumberland, and the South, are co-operating against 
Alabama and Florida in a lengthwise half circle, the center of which 
is Mobile, and it is qiiite hard for me to be left inactive, although 
the nearest to this center. I hope, therefore, that the commanding 
general will kindly forgive me when, repeating once more my former 
request, I respectfully ask a chance to participate, in behalf of the 
Department of the Gulf, in the combined contest and contribute my 
humble part, at least within the limits of the District of West Flor- 
ida, which I have the honor to command, so much the more so as 
Barrancas offers undoubtedly the J>est and safest base of operations. 

•Omitted. 

t See also Peck's report, Part I, p. 356. 



6 S. C, FLA., and on the GA. coast. (Chap. XLVn. 

Two steamers, as already ordered by the commanding general, of 
not more than 4 feet draught, and-'one regiment of cavalry and two 
of infantry would enable me, under the above combined movements, 
to enter and control the Perdido, Escambia, Blackwater, Yellow- 
water, and Choctawhatchee Rivers, to destroy the rebel force at 
Gonzales Camp, to cut off the railroad communication of Mobile 
with Montgomery, capture all the isolated rebel camps this side the 
Mobile Bay, thus deprive the garrison of Fort Morgan of land sup- 
port and of the possibility to escape Admiral Farragut's iron grasp ; 
also prevent all further re-enforcements and supplies for Mobile 
from Johnston's army, send starvation to that city, and open the 
way for thousands of starving Union svmpathizers in West Florida 
to return to their old flag and join the tJnion army. 

At the present juncture the Mobile and Montgomery Railroad 
becomes the most valuable line of communication in the Confed- 
eracy, and its destruction appears not less important for us than the 
destruction of the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, just accomplished at 
Meridian, while it would require only a few regiments instead of as 
many army corps. 

In case the combined movements above alluded to should prove a 
mere stratagem, calculated to avert the enemy's attention from an- 
other field of operation, and should thus Sherman's army withdraw 
from Alabama and Gillmore's forces from East Florida, then the 
necessity of the re-enforcements asked for would become only more 
urgent, as the rebel troops now concentrated at and around Mobile, 
relieved from the large opposing armies, would no doubt avail them- 
selves very soon of the good chance to make a diversion upon the 
Pensacola navv-yard (probably in concert with the iron ram Ten- 
nessee) and a desire to strike the long-aimed blow, upon my small 
command. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ASBOTH, 
Brigadier- General. 

[Inclosure No. ].] 

Special Orders, |^ Hdqrs. District of West Florida, 

No. 46. ) Barrancas, Fla., March 2, 1864. 

« * 4: 4c * * « 

IV. It being one of the possibilities in prospect that th.e iron ram 
Tennessee, which the rebels have succeeded in getting over Dog 
River Bar, in Mobile Harbor, may pass, with aid of other smaller 
vessels, our blockading fleet off Mobile, and attempt an entrance into 
Pensacola Harbor, the commanding ofiBcers of Forts Pickens and 
Barrancas will stop all vessels approaching the harbor during the 
night until their character is fully ascertained. 

By order of Brigadier-General Asboth : , £ 

E. T. SPRAGUE. 
First Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. 

[Inclosure No. 2.] 

Headquarters District of West Florida, 

Barrancas, Fla., January 28, 1864.. 
Capt. J. L. Galloway : 

Captain : It appears from your official report of yesterday that 
Lieutenant Talford and Private Carrol, from Floyd's and Curry's 
companies, of the Confederate army, deputed by their associates. 



OHiP. XLVn.l COREESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION". 7- 

have pledged their word of honor to avail themselves of the amnesty 
of the President of the United States, and to return with their whole 
battalion, including horses, arms, equipments, &c., on 5th February, 
at Point Washington, at the head of Choctawhatchee Bay, to the 
old flag of the United States, in order to join the First Florida dav- 
alry, under organization here, in support of the Union. 

This report, emanating from you, I feel bound to receive with full 
confidence. I have accordingly made proper arrangements to re- 
ceive Lieutenant Talford, with all the ofl&cers and men of his bat- 
talion, at the time and place given by himself, and I will welcome 
them all in the name of the Government, the people, and Army of 
the United States, as friends, and give them all opportunity to unite 
once more their destinies with ours. I confidently hope that the 
example of Lieutenant Talford and his associates will be followed 
by many others, and that Western Florida will be in the Union 
very soon, not by conquest, bu.t of her own free will and accord. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ASBOTH, 
Brigadier-General. 



Hdqrs. Deft, of S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 

UisT. OP Florida, Hdqrs. Forces in the Field, 

March 4, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. T. Seymour, 

Commanding U. S. Forces, Jacksonville, Fla. : 

General : In further reply to your communication of the 25th 
February, 1864,* I have the honor to forward through you, to -the 
widow of the late Colonel Fribley, an ambrotype supposed to be the 
one referred to in the memorandvun accompanying your communi- 
cation. Traces have also been discovered of his watch, a letter 
from his wife to himself, and his diary, and steps have been taken 
to recover possession of them ; if successful the two former articles 
will be forwarded. That I may not be misunderstood, it is due to 
myself to state that no sympathy with the fate of any oflicers com- 
manding negro troops, but compassion for a widow in grief, has 
induced these efforts to recover for her relics which she must 
naturally value. 

I have- the honor to call your attention to the following report of 
an officer commanding an outpost of this ai'my : That at about 4 

E. m. on the 2d instant, some 15 of the enemy, mou,nted, approached 
is advanced vedettes with a flag of truce, apparently. When within 
about 600 yards they threw out skirmishers, advanced about 100" 
vards, withdrew their flag, a white one, and then dashed forward ; 
his vedettes fired upon them and retired, when, his reserve coming 
up, they retired. This statement unexplained, involves an act of 
perfidy in prostituting to base purpose one of the humanizing 
features of all civilized warfare. I have the honor to ask a full and 
satisfactory explanation of this act, and whether the same was per- 
petrated by and with the consent and approbation of the command- 
ing general. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. M. GAEDNER, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 

»SeePartI, p. 493. 



8 S. C^ ELA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. II,vn. 

Hdqrs. District of Florida, Dept. op the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., March 4, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. W. M. Gardner, 

Commanding Confederate Forces, East Florida: 

General : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
communication of this day, with an ambrotype supposed to be that 
referred to in a memorandum previously forwarded, and for which, 
in behalf of Mrs. Fribley, you have my thanks. And certainly no 
kindness you can show in this connection can be construed otherwise 
than afEecting those whom on both sides at all times we desire to 
shield from sorrow. 

With respect to the circumstances reported by you as having oc- 
curred on the afternoon of the 2d instant, that a parly of some 15 
men of my command advanced undercover of a flag of truce, which 
was withdrawn and from which party fire was then opened upon 
your vedettes, due inquiry will be made, and extreme punishment 
administered in the usual manner of niilitary justice, if the report 
be confirmed by investigation. But I believe that there must be an 
error in the statement, arising, probably, from the guidon of the 
company having been indistinctly seen. That such an act as is re- 
ferred to could have been perpetrated by my "consent ahd approba- 
tion " is a suspicion not justified by any conduct of mine, and is 
unworthy of reply. 

And I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient sei^ant, 

T. SEYMOUR, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters U. S. Forces, 
Fort Pulaski and Tybee Island, Ga., 

Fori Pulaski, Ga., March 5, 1864. 
Col. J. B. Howell : 

Sir : I have the honor to report that a blockade-runner ran ashore 
during the night of the 3d instant, on the east side of Tybee Island, 
was discovered by the pickets yesterday morning at 6. She proved 
to be a schooner of about 35 tons. Her cargo consists of alcohol 
and coffee. I shall take out her cSrgo to-night, as she cannot be got 
off. I have placed a guard, on board, and await further orders. 
The crew consists of Capt. John Wicks, Supercargo C. W. Hawes, 
Mate Henry Caserdy, and 2 seamen, John Thomas and William 
Sands. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JAS. E. BAILEY, 

Major Third Rhode Island Heavy AriUiery, Comdg. Post. 

[Indorsement. 1 

Headquarters Hilton Head District, 

Hilton Head, S. C, March 6, 1864. 
Respectfully forwarded, for the information of the major-general 
commanding. 

I respectfully further state that the prisoners are here, and in the' 
custody of the provost-marshal's guard. 

JOSHUA B. HOWELL, 
Colonel, Commanding District. 



Chap. XLVn.l CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 9 

Headquarters District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, Fla., March 6, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. J. W. Turner, 

Chief of Artillery: 
General : I beg that the artillery that has been indicated as 
proper for the works at this place, or that may be decided upon, may 
be sent here without delay. There is now an abundance of labor 
here to move these guns, and, what is of more moment still, the 
moral effect upon the country people derived from the presence of 
large guns, as an assurance of our permanent occupancy, will be of 
great value. Therefore please hasten them. 
Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

T. SEYMOUR, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

HiUon Head, S. C, March 7, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. A. H. Terry, 

Comdg. N. Dist., Dept. of the South, Folly Island, S: C. : 
General : The major-general commanding requests that you will 
send the detachment of the First North Carolina Colored Volun- 
teers to Jacksonville as soon as in your judgment it is safe to do so. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ED. W. SMITH, 
Lieutenant- Colonel and Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, March 7, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. T. Seymour, 

Comdg. Dist. of Florida, Jacksonville, Fla. : 

General : The major-general commanding is of the opinion that 
the state of affairs in Florida will not warrant an advance of your 
command for the present ; that therefore you will only look to the 
security of your position at Jacksonville. And he again calls your 
attention to your communication on the Saint John's River and sug- 
gests, lest guerrilla parties or ambuscades may annoy your transports, 
that you land a regiment from time to time at points below Jackson- 
ville, and scout the country a short distance into the interior. He 
has no doubt that the commanding officer of the naval forces in 
Saint John's will, on your application, co-operate with you with a 
gun-boat. 

Should your information of the force and position of the enemy 
lead you to the opinion that an advance would be advisable, you 
will immediately communicate with the commanding general, but 
under no consideration will you make an advance without instruc- 
tions. You will carry out your instructions in regard to garrisoning 
and fortifying Palatka, heretofore given, as soon as you can con- 
veniently. In view of the limited number of horses at our disposal 
to replace losses, and the great exertion and fatigue of your cavalry 
force, and in order to save as many of Colonel Henry's horses as 
possible, it is recommended to you to call in his command of cavalry, 



10 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLTII. 

replacing your pickets by infantry, using cavalry vedettes and 

i)atrols, and allow Colonel Henry's command to recruit. The artil- 
ery you called for is being forwarded. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOHN W. TURNER, 
Brigadier-General, Chief of Staff. 



Hdqks. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, March 8, 1864. 
Capt. J. A. Burns, 

Acting Assistant Quartermaster, Morris Island, S. C. : 
The brigadier-general commanding directs that all the boats in 
your possession, including those that you . have built, be fully 
equipped with oars, &c. , and sent to Pawnee Landing this day. 

I have the honor to be, captain, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

ADRIAN TERRY, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, March 8, 1864. 
Capt. John L. Suess, 

New York Volunteer Engineers: 
The brigadier-general commanding directs that you immediately 
prepare material for repairing bridge from Cole's Island to James 
Island and have it loaded into lighters this day. Capt. J. A. Burns, 
acting assistant quartermaster, will supply the lumber requisite. 

I have the honor to be, captain, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

ADRIAN TERRY, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S'. C, March 8, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. A. Schimmei.pennig, 

Commanding U. S. Forces, Folly Island, S. C. : 
General : I am directed by the brigadier-general commanding to 
request that you will get ready 1,000 men, in light marching order, 
with three days' cooked rations, to be in readiness to move at 4 p. m. 
this day. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

ADRIAN TERRY, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 
(Similar copy sent to Colonel Davis.) 



Morris Island, S. C, March 8, 1864. 
Captain Terry, 

Assistant Adjutant- General, Folly Island, 8. C. : 
This will nearly clean me out of available force and leave nothing 
here to guard the island. To take this force from "Morris Island 



Chap. XLVtl.] COEKESPONDENOE, ETC. — ITNIO^. 11 

will endanger our defenses here. I will have the men ready, but 
while they are absent will not be responsible for what may happen. 
The First Brigade has not a man on this island that can be detailed 
for any purpose ; the Second has present 2,000. Of these over 300 
are without arms and 400 have just received arms ; 450 are on special 
duty in boat infantry, and other purposes ; 150 are the garrison of 
Shaw and can't be disturbed ; then take out the cooks, musicians, 
&c. , and there Avill be nobody left to call upon. I respectfully pro- 
test against troops being taken from this island for any purpose. 

W. W. H. DAVIS, 

Colonel. 



Headquarters District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, March 8, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. J. W. Turner, 

Chief of Artillery: 
General : I have again to urge that guns may be provided here, 
without delay, of such a nature as will indicate that we may not 
evacuate this place in a hurry. If they are not to be expected, I beg 
that I may be so informed ; if they are, that I be advised of the 
probable time of their arrival here. Rather than experience delay, 
I shall be glad to have any siege guns, 24-pounder James rifles, 8- 
inch siege howitzers, carronades, 24-pounders, anything of a toler- 
ably heavy caliber and size. Two or three such 'might be sparetl 
from Fort Pulaski, perhaps. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

T. SEYMOUR, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 

[Indorsement.] 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, March 12, 1864. 

More guns than General Seymour asked for have already been 
sent him. 

Q. A. GILLMORE, 
Ma,jor- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters District op Florida, 

Jacksonville, Fla., March 8, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. J. W. Turner, 

Chief of Staff: 
General: I have to inform you that there is nothing further to 
report, except that a force of infantry has been moved by the rebels 
to the King's road, and there are indications of defensive measures 
being taken by them on the Six-Mile or Cedar Creek. Deserters 
come in constantly and report that if they knew that they would be 
kindly treated, and not sent North, many more would come to us. 
One recently from Dalton, Ga., gives a firm conviction that when 
the time of service is out (May T), many of the rebel regiments will 
stack their arms and refuse to fight longer. If guns were here so 
that I could place strong confidence in the resistive power of these 



12 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

works, an expedition would be sent at once to occupy Palatka, but 
I do not like to weaken this command unless the works are per- 
fected, armament and all. The hastening of cannon is therefore 
urged. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

T. SEYMOUR, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 

[Indorsement.] 

Headquakters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, March 12, 1864. 
It is not understood that General Seymour is asking for guns in 
addition to those for which he has already made requisition and 
which have been sent to him. 

Q. A. GILLMORE, 
Ilqjor- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters District of West Florida, 

Barrancas, March 8, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. Charles P. Stone, 

Chief of Staff, Dept. of the Gulf : 

General : I have the honor to report, in connection with my report 
of March 4, No. 122, the following additional information received 
from a refugee, Thomas E. Cramner, just from Mobile, by way of 
Pollard: Colonel Holland, Thirty-seventh Mississippi Infantry, sta- 
tioned at Pollard, is making preparation for a raid with 400 to 500 
cavalry on the Pensacola navy-yard, in connection with the raid of 
Colonel Miller on East Bay. We are prepared with our small force 
to receive them properly. Mr. Cramner has taken an active part in 
the rebellion as engineer, but, availing himself of the President's am- 
nesty, leaves to-morrow for New Orleans, and I thought it proper 
to give him an introduction to you in order that you maj'^ question 
him yourself. His statements are somewhat confused, and I do not 
feel inclined to give them much credit. Three other deserters, 
arriving also this day from Morgan and Dalton, have given me the 
inclosed statements, which I consider more reliable. 

There are over 200 refugees and deserters in the neighborhood of 
Saint Mark's, Fla., the terminus of the Tallahassee railroad, in open 
war with the Confederacy, and I would respectfully request for the 
use of a transport steamer to bring in those men for the Florida 
cavalry. They have about 60 horses with them. Gillraore's forces 
have withdrawn from Lake City to Jacksonville ; in my humble 
opinion, a combined movement toward Tallahassee from the Atlan- 
tic via Jacksonville and Lake City, and from the Gulf via Saint 
Mark's, would have proved more disastrous for the rebels, and I 
would most respectfully request to be enabled to establish a perma- 
nent post at Saint Mark's ; it would afford another safe base of oper- 
ations toward the interior of Florida, protected, as it is, by blockad- 
ing vessels of Admiral Farragut, anchored near the light-house, 7. 
miles seaward from Saint Mark's. 

I am, very respectfully-, general, your obedient servant, 

ASBOTH, 
Brigadier- General. 



Chap. XLVU.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 13 

[Inclosure No. 1.] 

Statement of Lieut. John L. West, First Florida Infantry, C. S. Army. 

Left his regiment on the loth of February at Dalton, Ga. John- 
ston's army numbers 30,000 to 35,000 men. Veteran troops, forming 
two army corps under Hayman [HindmanJ and Hardee. The men 
have no shoes ; their rations consist of Florida beef and corn. The 
beef is so poor that the men cannot eat it. General Johnston does 
not intend to give battle at Dalton, but will witlidraw toward Atlanta 
if pressed by Grant. The spirit of the army is in favor of peace. 
The men re-enlist only to get furloughs and never return. Horses 
are generally in very bad condition and sent to the rear to recruit. 

(Inclosure No. 3. J 

Statement of A. S. Kitchen and B. B. Royals, First Battalion Ala- 
bama Artillery. 

Brig. Gen. Edward Higgins is at jjresent commanding at Fort 
Morgan, Fort Gaines, Fort Powell (Grant's Pass), and Cedar Point. 
The Tennessee is not yet over the Dog River Bar, but is sticking in 
the mud of Sponge River ; the deepest channel 9 feet 10 inches. 
Six steamers were unable to move her back. They are at a ■ loss 
what to do with her. Not one of the iron-clad boats is this side of 
the bar. There are four inside. The Tennessee, plated with 4-inch 
iron, mounts eight guns; ram Baltic plated with 3-inch iron, the 
wheel-house protected with cotton ; Huntsville and Nashville with 
four guns eacli. Besides those iron-clads, there are three wooden 
gun-boats, Seima, Gaines, and Morgan. Selma was built for a lake 
boat at New York and is unseaworthy; the Gaines and Morgan were 
built at Mobile during the war and are good boats, but not much 
strength in them. They are building at present two floating bat- 
teries with one gun each. At Grant's Pass, boats with 10 feet 
draught can pass. They are trying to put obstructions in the chan- 
nel, but they do not amount to much. The battery guarding Grant's 
Pass is considered bomb-proof, being covered with 10 to 15 feet of 
oyster shells. 



Hdqrs. District of Key West and Tortugas, 

Key West, March 8, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. Charles P. Stone, 

Chief of Staff, Dept. of the Oulf, New Orleans : 
General : I inclose herewith the copy of a letter from Lieut. 
Commander D. B. Harmony, commanding the U. S. gun-boat 
Tahoma, stationed at Saint Mark's Bay. The men alluded to have 
already had several skirmishes with rebel cavalry and are fully 
committed. I shall go up in a few days to enlist them, if practi- 
cable. If they decline I respectfully ask permission to furnish for 
their use arms and ammunition in moderate quantities, also pro- 
visions and shoes. These men will be useful to ua, whether enlisted 
or not. They are, I understand, at the present time, under the ad- 
vice of Commander Harmony, on an expedition to bum the bridge 
over the Suwannee River on the Jacksonville and Tallahassee Rail- 
road, about 30 miles west of Lake City. 
Respectfully, 

D. P. WOODBURY, 

Brigadier- General. 



14 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVIL 



•1 

[Inolosure.] 



U. S. S. Tahoma, 
Saint Mark's Bay, February 29, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. D. P. Woodbury, Key Went, Fla. : 

General : Your note of 26th instant lias been received, and also 
the ammunition, coffee, and siigar ; the latter will be useful to the 
loyal people here, the former not, as they only have the Mississippi 
rifle and shotguns. I will give it to them, however, and they may be 
enabled to put it to some use. If possible, I would suggest the ad- 
visability of sending them good muskets. I feel certain they would 
do good service with them. Already have I employed them to assist 
me on an expedition about 45 miles east of this point to destroy the 
largest salt-works in the Confederacy — 395 kettles and 52 boilers, 
having capacity to make about 1,000 bushels daily. 

Some few days since, I had them all called together and regularly 
organized, under regulations or laws which I prepared. They were 
formed into two companies, each numbering about 80 men, elected 
a captain and 3 lieutenants for each. After they had organized 
I planned a raid on the Atlantic and Gulf Railroad, to strike the 
bridge over the Suwannee River. Its destruction will give a good 
deal of trouble in moving their supplies from Tallahassee to their 
forces confronting General Gillmore's army, between Lake City and 
Baldwin. 

I regret to say that I do not think any of them would be willing 
to enlist in the U. S. Army. They prefer to act independently. 
Their only objection to enlisting regularly is that they do not want 
to leave their homes, and they fear that they might be ordered away. 
Besides, almost every one is married, and that would be a decided 
objection. Every day they are increasing their numbers ; 300 men 
from General Joe Johnston's army are en route to join them, and I 
have taken every means to let it be known whenever I have had 
opportunity that this organization exists here. I have directed some 
of the most intelligent among them to go out among the people in 
the different counties and canvass for recruits. Since it is known 
. by the authorities that I am assisting them, they have increased 
their force in this neighborhood quite largely, which takes so many 
men from their army that are fighting General Gillmore. If I had 
arms, bread, and shoes to give them, I am satisfied I could get 500 
men together in three weeks, and could employ them destroying 
railroads, bridges, and manufactories of shot, shell, &c., all of which 
would do the rebels great injury. They (the refugees) are deter- 
mined to hang together until they have driven every rebel soldier 
out of Florida. There is another company down on the Suwannee 
River whose captain I have seen. I have advised that company to 
come up here. They number 50 men. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

D. B. HARMONY, 
Lieutenant- Commander, V. S. Navy. 



Hdqrs. District of Florida, Deft, of the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., March 9, 1864 
Brig. Gen. J. W. Turner, 

Chief of Staff and Chief of Artillery, Dept. of the South : 
General : I have the honor to request that the Harriet A. Weed 
may be sent here for duty in this river, or that some vessel of light 



Chap. XLVU.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 15 

draught, Avell armed, may be supplied for this purpose. And if a 
small, very light draught steamer (4 feet) can be supplied for 
running into the small streams that empty into the Saint John's 
and into the shallow waters at the head of the river, it will be of 
the greatest possible value. I trust such may be captured here, but 
it is too doubtful to be relied upon. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

T. SEYMOUR, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, Fla., March 9, 1864. 
Brigadier-General Turner, Chief of Staff: 

General : I have this morning decided to occupy Palatka without 
longer delay, and have accordingly ordered Colonel Barton to pro- 
ceed to that place to-night ; his command is strengthened by five 
companies of the Fifty-fifth Massachusetts (Colonel Hartwell) and two 
sections of James' battery. Lieutenant Michie accompanies Colonel 
Barton, with instructions to throw up such defensive works as may 
be necessary, and to be held by a minimum garrison of about 500. 
Colonel Barton is instructed to send a force to Orange Springs, if on 
his arrival he shall ascertain that a steamer is there, and that there 
is no body of the enemy to oppose materially, and with a view to 
obtaining possession of a light-draught vessel. As no cavalry can 
be spared from here. Captain James will mount, for this purpose, as 
many of his drivers as can be spared. The Columbine, to be fol- 
lowed immediately by the Ottawa, will convoy the transports. It 
is believed that there are many would-be loyal persons who will re- 
sort to us for protection when Palatka is known to be permanently 
occupied. 

Respectfully, general, yoiir obedient servant, 

T. SEYMOUR, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 

[Indorsement.] 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, March 12, 1864. 
Palatka should be fortified so that the position can be held against 
great odds. A field-work, inclosed with a formidable obstacle on all 
sides, will perhaps suffice, and no offensive operations involving the 
possibility of a defeat should be undertaken until these defenses are 
in an efficient condition. 

Q. A. GILLMORE, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, March 10, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. H. "W. Halleck, 

General-in-Chief, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C. : 

Sir : I have to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of 
the 26th ultimo,* ia reply to mine of the 13th and 16th. I certainly 
failed to make myself understood, if I conveyed the idea that I con- 

.*See Part I, p. 493. 



16 S, C, FLA., AND ON THE GX. COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

eidered matters of a private and personal character of sufficient im- 
portance to take me from my duties. With regard to Florida, mv 
letter of February 13, from Jacksonville, stated briefly the approxi- 
mate strength and disposition of the forces that I intended to keep- 
there. General Seymour's discomfiture at Olustee has somewhat 
disarranged my plans and delayed their execution, and has rendered 
it necessary to place for the present in Florida nearly three times as 
many troops as I intend to keep there after the defensive arrange- 
ments ordered at certain points are completed, and esjjecially after 
the enemy withdraws a portion of the forces from the State, as he 
assuredly will when our armies at other points resume active opera- 
tions. The value of Florida to the enemy has been overlooked by 
us to a great extent. I am convinced that they have drawn from 
the counties along the line of the Fernandina and Cedar Keys Rail- 
road an average of 2,000 head of cattle per week during the past 
year. As regards prospective operations against Charleston, I nad 
a long conference with Rear- Admiral Dahlgren some days since, on 
the evening before he started for Washington. The admiral desires 
to resume active operations in that quarter as soon as he receives the 
expected re-enforcements to his fleet, and it is of course my wish to 
co-operate with him. I informed the Department in my communi- 
cation of December 17, 1863, that with 10,000 or 13,000 good infantry 
I could operate by way of James Island or BuU's^Bay.- I understood 
from Admiral Dahlgren that either of these operations, or the cap- 
ture of Sullivan's Island instead, would meet his views of the re- 
quirements of the case. When my veterans return I am prepared 
to undertake one or the other of these operations. The new colored 
regiments add materially to my strength for such work. I have 
directed General Turner, my chief of staff, to deliver this letter. He 
is prepared to enter more fully upon the merits of the question than 
I can m writing. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Q. A. GILLMORE, 
3Iajor- General, Commanding, 



Headquarters District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, March 10, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. J. W. Turner, Chief of Staff: 

General : I have the honor to report that at daylight this morn- 
ing Colonel Barton occupied Palatka without opposition. It had not 
been possible to ascertain the localities of the steamers on the Ockla- 
waha up to the time the transports left Palatka (3 p. m.). The en- 
emy's cavalry pickets were 9 miles from Palatka, a small force at 
Gainesville, 1,000 cavalry at Starke. More cavalry is badly needed 
here, and I would urge that as soon as a few companies of the Thir(| 
New Hampshire can be mounted they be sent here, where they will be 
rapidly instructed. Captain Elder desires that he may be furnished 
with the 13-pOunder howitzers left at Kiawah, the 3-inch rifles being 
of exceedingly little use in a wooded country like this. I suppose 
that Captain Langdon would also be provided with them instead of 
the 12-pounder, which is too heavy. The subject merits considera- 
tion. 

Respectfully, your (Jbedient servant, 

T. SEYMOUR, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Chap. XLVU.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 17 

[Indorsement.] 

Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, March 12, 1864. 
Laiigdon's and Elder's batteries will have to remain as now organ- 
ized, which organization was approved and desired by them before 
they went to Florida. There is more artillery now in Florida than 
it is the intention to leave there. Palatka should be fortified at once. 
The Third New Hampshire Mounted Infantry will be sent to Gen- 
eral Seymour in a few days. 

Q. A. GILLMORE, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Barton's Brigade, 

Palalka, Fla., March 10, 1864. 
Capt. P. R. Chadwick, 

Assistant Adjtitant- General, District of Florida ': 

Captain : I have the honor to advise you that, in accordance with 
the instructions from the brigadier-general commanding the district, 
I occupied this place without opposition at early daylight this' morn- 
ing. I learn that the enemy's pickets are at Nine-Mile Hammock, 
on the Orange Springs road, and at a point 4 miles distant from Pa- 
latka on the Rice Creek road ; a force of over 1,000 cavalry, under 
General Patton Anderson, are at Starke. There is considerable 
uncertainty as to the present whereabouts of the small steamers 
which formerly plied on the Saint John's River, but one of them is 
supposed to be at Fort Brooke. As I have reason to believe that the 
enemy is ere this apprised of our arrival, I have not deemed it pru- 
dent to make an attempt to secure this boat, as any movement in 
that direction would undoubtedly call down the whole of Anderson's 
force (it being as near Fort Brooke as we are), and would result in 
the capture or destruction of the inferior force I might send. I have, 
however, sent Captain James out in the direction of Nine- Mile Ham- 
mock and on the Rice Creek road, for the purpose of capturing a 
noted rebel or two in that quarter. There seems to be none of the 
enemy's troops on the Saint Augustine side of the river. I send you 
a deserter to whose statements I respectfully direct your attention, 
especially as regards the force in your front. 

The Delaware and Houghton are sent. The Maple Leaf is hard 
aground, and the Hunter is employed in unloading her. The de- 
fensive works are well under way. 

W. B. BARTON, 
Colonel 4:8th New York Volunteers, Commanding Brigade. 



Flag-Ship New Ironsides, 
Off Morris Island, S. C, March 14, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore, 

Comdg. Department of the South, Hilton Head : 
Sir : If the services of the U. S. ship McDonough can be spared 
in Light-House Inlet, I can use her elsewhere. I do not wish to take 
her from her station, however, if she is useful to you. I should be 
glad to have your views on the subject. 

S. C. ROWAN, 
Comdg. South Atlantic Blocka,ding Squadron, pro tem, 
2 R R— VOL XXXV, PT U 



18 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Cbap. XLVn. 

Jacksonville, March 14, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. J. W. Turner, 

Chief of Staff: 

General : I have to report that I returned from a visit to Palatka 
last night. The defensive works there are already in a condition for 
use, and although more extensive necessarily than was anticipated, 
on account of the topographic features of the locality, are very 
favorable for defense by a garrison of from 500 to 800 men.* 

The redoubt in the center will require two or three siege guns, and 
I shall probably send there two 24-pounder smooth and one of the 
old carronades ; the two 6-pounders captured here to be so arranged 
as to be placed wherever circumstances may direct, and to be har- 
nessed by the post teams and left habitually in reserve. As Saint 
Augustine cannot now be approached by any force except small 
squads of cavalry, a few of the unimportant giins there might prop- 
erly be taken either to this point, Jacksonville, or to Palatka. I 
would recommend that Picolata be occupied soon, or a point imme- 
diately opposite it would be better, if a favorable place can be found 
for holding by a small force. 

There are many refugees in the vicinity of Palatka, and partic-, 
ularly on the east side of the river, and as soon as it is evident that 
Palatka is permanently occupied I doubt not but that many deserters 
will cross to the east side of the river, and that some organization 
may be effected for their protection. 

There is no news from the immediate vicinity. I would suggest 
to the major-general commanding the propriety of bringing to this 
point, when the veterans shall have returned, every available man in 
the department, for the purpose of attacking the enemy's force near 
here. Probably an overpowering attack might have the happiest 
result. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

T. SEYMOUR, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 

[Indotsement.] 

March 16, 1864. 
The intrenchments at Palatka should be made very strong, as 
regards their power of passive resistance. The establishment of a 
post at Picolata is not deemed advisable just now. 

I desire that especial attention be directed to the safety and per- 
fect security of our water communication as far up as Jacksonville. 
The enemy ought not to be allowed to get on the bank of the stream 
below that place; Frequent scouts from the river under cover of a 
gun-boat are recommended. 

Q. A. GILLMORE, 

Major-Oeneral. -^ 

Hdqrs. District op Florida, Dept. op the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla,, March 15, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. J. W. Turner, 

Chief of Staff and of Artillery, Dept. of the South : 
General : I have to report that there are now here three 30- 
pounder and two 20-pounder Parrott rifles, one 24-pounder James 

*Small diagram omitted 



Cbap. XLVU.l CORRESPOITOENCE, ETC. — UNION. 19 

rifle, two 8-inch siege howitzers, four 24-pounder howitzers (brass), 
one 42-pounder carronade, one 33-pounder carronade, two 18-pounder 
siege guns (smooth-bores), two 8-inch siege mortars, and that two 
8-inch sea-coast howitzers and one 8-inch naval gun are expected 
soon. 

The following disposition will be made of the above guns, unless 
good reasons should be found for modifying the plan on account of 
the arrival of cannon not expected at present :* 

First. Redoubt Sammon, one 8-inch sea-coast howitzer, one 8-inch 
siege howitzer, one 24:-pounder James, one 8-inch mortar. 

Second. Battery Myrick, to be occupied by field guns, as occasion 
may require. 

Third. Redoubt Fribley, one 8-inch naval gun, one 8-inch siege 
howitzer, two 30-pounder Parrotts, one 8-inch mortar. 
' Fourth. Battery McCrea now hq^ two 6-pounder field (brass), to be 
vacated soon. 

Fifth. Redoubt Reed, one 8-inch sea-coast howitzer, one 42-pounder 
carronade, one 30-pounder Parrott, and one mortar, if it comes. 

Sixth. Redoubt Moore. 

Seventh. Battery Hamilton by field guns, as No. 3 and No. 4. 
The four 24-pounder howitzers and two 20-pounder Parrotts, with 
the three 3-inch captured rifles, to be parked as a reserve. 

Redoubt Moore has not yet been commenced, and upon examina- 
tion to-day, after the ground has been well cleared of trees, it seems 
unnecessary to place one there (at the cemetery). The ground 
across the creek (Hogan's) is perfectly commanded by the fire from 
Redoubt Reed. Until the major-general commanding can inspect 
and decide upon this I have decided that the ground be not dis- 
turbed.* The cutting of timber proceeds as rapidly as the want of 
axes will allow, and the country across the creek is now well opened. 

At Palatka has been constructed a central redoubt (No. 2), and at- 
Nos. 1 and 3 are positions for one or two field guns.* 

The only artillery now there is two 3-inch rifles and two 12- 
pounder howitzers of Captain James' battery. 

It is probable that the redoubt will be armed with the two 18- 
pounders and one 32-pounder carronade now here, and probably 
(if an arrangement to be suggested should fail) that the two cap- 
tured 6-pounders now here will be sent there, and such means sup- 
plied as will compel no portion of a mounted battery to be kept 
there. The works are probably nearly ready for these guns. 

The arrangement referred to is that there be sent here any old 
iron guns (field) that may be useless elsewhere. I believe that there 
are several such at Hilton Head. If I am not mistaken there are 
several at Saint Augustine, quite useless there, that may well be 
brought here, and that are good for canister to any extent. I pro- 
pose to go to Saint Augustine soon to procure such guns. One or 
two are much wanted at Yellow Bluff, one or two at Palatka, 
others here. They are as good for these purposes as brass guns of 
later date. 

The work at Yellow Bluif is complete. A signal tower there is 
nearly finished, and is already occupied by a party (to-day), and a 
station is established at the mouth of the Saint John's. It will 
be necessary to construct a tower here. These communications will 
be of great service. 

* Small diagrams omitted. 



20 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. ICh»p. XLVII. 

When the three 8-inch shell guns and another 8-inch siege mor- 
tar shall have arrived, no more guns will be required, except as 
above referred to, and these, perhaps, can be procured at Saint 
Augustine, as indicated. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

T. SEYMOUR, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Washington, March 16, 1864—12.30 p. m. 
Lieutenant-General Grant, 

Nashville, Tenn. : 
The furloughs of veteran regiments from the Department of the 
South (Hilton Head) are about to expire. If it is proposed to bring 
any troops North from that department for the coming campaign, 
should not these regiments be retained, in order to avoid double 
transportation ? 

H. W. HALLECK, 
Major- General and Chi^ of Staff. 



Nashville, Tenn., March 16, 1864—7 p. m. 

(Received 10.40 p. m.) 
Major-General Halleck, 

Chief of Staff: 
To avoid double transportation I desire the veteran regiments 
from the Department of the South rendezvoused at some point from 
■whence they can be moved with facility, either to the Army of the 
Potomac or to Hilton Head, as may be required. 

U. S. GRANT, 

Lieutenant- General. 



Washington, D. C, March 16, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore, 

Department of the South: 

General : Your dispatches of the 10th; transmitting your state- 
ment of the Olustee affair in Florida,* is just received. The state- 
ment will be immediately copied and submitted to the Secretary of 
War, to accompany the papers called for by the Committee on the 
Conduct of the War. 

Until Lieutenant-General Grant returns from the West I presume 
no additional instructions will be given by the War Department in , 
regard to military operations in your department. 

In regard to your suggestion that General Turner, of your staff, 
bearer of dispatches, will enter more fully into the -merits of your 
plans, I beg leave to remark that the War Department disapproves 
the sending of staff officers to Washington to discuss or explain 

Elans of generals in the field. In the first place, verbal explanations 
y subordinates are liable to be misunderstood, and subsequently 
to give rise to questions of facts and conflicts of memories. A ver- 

•See Part I, p. 276. 



Chap. XLVni CORRESPOITDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 21 

bal message or statement transmitted through three or four different 
persons is very likely, with the best motives of all concerned, to have 
a very different aspect when it reaches the Secretary of War or 
the President than it had when first uttered. 

In the second place, plans of operations should [not], as a general 
rule, be divulged to suoordinates. I do not mean that opinions of 
subordinates should not be consulted, but the final determination 
of the general should be known to as few persons as possible. 

Moreover, the Secretary of War very strongly disapproves of the 
practice of sending staif officers to Washington for the purpose of 
delivering dispatches which could be as well sent by mail. He re- 
gards it as an abuse of authority on the part of generals, and as 
entailing an unnecessary expense on the Government. In several 
instances he has ordered back the officers and charged the expense 
of their transportation to the generals who sent thein here. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. W. HALLECK, 
Majm'- General and Chief of Staff. 



Hdqrs. District of Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, Ma., March 16, 1864. 

Capt. G. B. Balch, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding Naval Forces, Saint John's River : 

Captain : I am happy to announce to you that the Columbine 
captured, on the 13th instant, in Lake George, the steamer Sumter 
with all her officers and crew; that the Sumter has been manned and 
sent after the Hattie Brock, which it is believed will also be cap- 
tured, with about 150 bales of cotton. 

This information is received this morning from Colonel Barton, 
and will give you no greater pleasure than it has given myself. The 
difficulties that have been overcome by the Columbine are repre- 
sented as having been great, and its commander deserves much 
credit for the exercise of great intelligence and energy in having 
overcome them. I trust these qualities will be rewarded to a still 
greater extent by still greater success. 

Those small steamers will be of the greatest value to us in navi- 
gating the river, and for scouting in regions where vessels of heav- 
ier draught could not penetrate. If possible, I shall therefore be 
glad to have them for these purposes. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

T. SEYMOUR, 
Brigadier- Oeneral, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. District of Florida, Dept. op the South, 

Jachsonville, Fla., March 16, 1864. 

Col. W. B. Barton, 

Forty-eighth New York, Comdg., Palatka, Ma.: 
Colonel : The quartermaster, .is directed to send you 50 horses, 
saddles, and bridles, without delay. You will select and mount an 
infantry company temporarily, being careful to select a good cap- 
tain, who will see that the best use possible is made of these animals. 



22 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

than whicli no better are now at my disposal. You will appoint an 
officer to receipt for the ordnance that is sent to you. Lieutenant 
Michie, U. S. Engineers, will inform you as to the destination of the 
cannon. Two 18-pounders, two 6-pounders (brass), and two 3-inch 
rifles are forwarded. Captain James' guns will be left in reserve, 
and as 2 horses can draw these small guns a short distance, Cap- 
tain James may be charged with the conduct of the two rifles (3- 
inch) as a part of the reserve artillery. The rifle-pits running 
through the oak wood will be enlarged so that the ditch will be a 
decided obstacle, which stockade will be placed at Mr. Michie's 
direction. A line of abatis from the river to the cleared ground, 
through this wood, will be constructed, say 200 yards in advance 
of the ditch, and this abatis will be made as strong as possible. 
Some of the trees near the works (and in rear) will be arranged so 
that sharpshooters can occupy them ; a plank with slats nafled to 
it so as to ascend the tree. The wood will be spared the ax at 
present. The palmettoes can probably be burned ; if so, put a regi- 
ment out to effect it. Place all the obstacles in front of your works 
that you can, particularly on the left. 

The Ottawa goes up to-day ; as she cannot get over the flats with- 
out assistance, you will send the Hunter to assist her at the earliest 
moment. Send the Hunter back the night following her arrival. 

I am doubtful about your sending to Silver Springs ; it is some 
distance beyond Orange Springs, on the road to Gainesville. Any 
cavalry that you send there will probably be lost, and you will under- 
take nothing that does not give every prospect of success. As your 
information is much better than mine, the matter is left to your own 
discretion. Endeavor to get reliable persons to penetrate (to be 
gone several days) to Gainesville, &c. A good negro guide, with a 
good white soldier, seems the best method. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

T. SEYMOUR, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. District op Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., March 17, 1864. 
Brigadier-General Turner, 

Chief of Staff: 

General : I have the honor to submit to' the major-general com- 
manding the suggestion that during April and May operations can 
go on in Florida with perfect comfort to the command, after which 
extreme hot weather will probably preclude all offensive move- 
ments. ^ 

Charleston, the Confederates now well understand, cannot be seri- 
ously approached with any force in this department ; the same is 
doubtless true of Savannah. At both those points neither offensive 
nor defensive operations will be of much moment. 

In Florida the enemy has concentrated all troops that can be 
spared from the above points. Attention can be distracted to other 
places, and by the use, for a week or so, of all the troops that can be 
spared elsewhere, the oppo'sing forces here should be overcome. If 
such a result can be obtained, its importance cannot be overrated. 
To vanquish such troops as are in the field is the final military aim 



Chap. XLVn.] . CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. " 23 

of our cause, and there have previously been no such opportunities 
for the armed force of the Department of the South to be well em- 
ployed as in Florida. And now that the State is to be considered an 
object worth holding or attaining, these opportunities may well be 
improved. These considerations have doubtless already occurred 
to the major-general commanding, but there can be no impropriety 
in stating them in this manner. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

T. SEYMOUR, 
Brigadier-Oeneral, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. District op Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., March 17, 1864. • 
Brigadier-General Turner, 

Chief of Staff: 
General : It is reported to me this morning by Major Stevens, 
commanding mounted force, that a sergeant and 1 private of the 
Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry, and a negro (Jerome), not an enlisted 
man, who were sent out on the 14th as scouts, have been Qaptured 
by the enemy, whose very largely preponderating force of cavalry 
makes any such mode of obtaining information very uncertain. 
Respectfully, general, your obedient servant, 

T. SEYMOUR, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding . 



Special Orders, ) War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 
No. 121. ) Washington, March 18, 1864. 

« * 4! 4! « * iH 

16. Veteran regiments and companies from the Department of the 
South now in or to arrive in their respective States on furlough will, 
on the expiration thereof, be ordered by the superintendents of the 
volunteer pecruiting service for the States concerned to Washing- 
ton, D. C, reporting to Major-General Casey, U. S. Volunteers, 
who will command them. 

******* 

By order of the Secretary of War : 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 

Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, March 19, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

General-in-Chief, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C. : 

General : In response to your letter of the 26th ultimo,* to which 

I partially replied in mine of the 10th instant, I have to say that 

from 7,000 to 11,000 effective fighting men may be spared from this 

department and still leave it in 3, condition of safe quiescent defense. 

*See Part I, p. 493. 



24 S. a, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. >{Chap. XLVn. 

This force corresponds pretty nearly with the present available 
strength of the thirteen regiments of infantry, one regiment of 
heavy artillery, one battalion of cavalry, one regiment of volun- 
teer engineers, and the four batteries which comprise the Tenth 
Army Corps. There seems no special objection to a division of the 
engineers and artillery force of the corps should circumstances 
render it necessary or advisable to do so. I therefore request, in case 
it be decided to leave the force on this coast in a purely defensive at- 
titude, that I may be ordered out of this department with my own 
corps to some command where it can serve together as a unit, with 
authority to leavd behind me temporarily sueh portions of the artil- 
lery and engineer force of the corps as I may deem proper. I desire 
very much to join some large army in the field where the operations 
will be purely military and not dependent for success upon two dis- 
tinct branches of the public service. If I cannot take the Tenth 
Corps to some point where it can serve as a unit of an army con- 
ducting offensive operations I have no desire to take it out of this 
department. There are, however, sanitary reasons why the troops 
comprising this corps should leave the coast. I inclose a note from 
my medical director covering this point. I desire in this connection 
to express my opinion that all the troops now serving in this depart- 
ment can be used here to advantage. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Q. A. GILLMORE, 
Major-Oeneral, Commanding. 

[Inclosure.] 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

March 19, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore,. 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Hilton Head, S. C. : 
General : In reply to your inquiry of this date in regard to the 
class of troops, with reference to their date of service in this 
department, which should, if the exigencies of the service demand 
it, be transferred to a more northern climate, I would respectfully 
say, in my opinion of the sanitary condition of the soldiers, you 
should select the regiments which have passed two summers here. 
I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

EBEN. SWIFT, 
Surgeon, U. S. Army, Medical Director. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, March 21, 1864. 

Commodore, Rowan, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, off Charleston : 
Sir : I have now in use in this department five armed steam trans- 
ports, their service being chiefly picket diity ; they are also used for 
transportation or convoys along those of our inland routes of com- 
munication where there is danger of meeting the enemy, also fot 
scouting. These operations. are not deemed important enough to 
call for the co-operation of your branch of the service. T have ex- 
perienced, as you well know must be the case, tlie inconvenience of 



Chap. XLVn.] CORKESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION, 25 :. 

having no officer possessing sufficient experience to properly outfit 
and command such vessels. My steam-boat masters are citizens 
and know nothing of artillery. My artillery officers are not sailors 
and are not acquainted with naval gunnery. 

It would be of advantage to this army if I could avail myself of 
the services of one of the young officers of your squadron for the 
duty above indicated. I take the liberty of suggesting Acting 
Ensign William C. Hanford, now executive officer of the U. S. 
brig Perry, on the Fernandina Station, as a most suitable officer 
for this duty, from his large experience in similar service to that 
above designated in our Western rivers under Admiral Porter. If 
you will order him to report to me for temporary duty I will esteem 
it a favor. 

I congratulate you heartily, commodore, on your being confirmed 
in your present rank, and assure you that the event affords pleasure 
to my whole command. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Q. A. GILLMOEE, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters District op Florida, 

Jacksonville, Fla., March 31, 1864. 
Brigadier-General Turner, 

Chief of Staff: 
General : I am informed authentically that the rebels are taking 
up the railroad from here to Baldwin, and for the purpose of con- 
structing one between the Georgia and Florida Railroad. Also, that 
about 5,000 of their best infantry have gone back to Charleston and 
that about 10,000 remain here, of which a very large proportion is 
cavalry. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

T. SEYMOUR, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, Fla., March 21, 1864. 
Brigadier-General Turner, 

Chief of Staff and of Artillery : 
General : I am in receipt of my returned communication of 
March 15, on the subject of the artillery defenses of Jacksonville 
and Palatka. 

The major-general commanding has indorsed on the letter that 
"there are twenty-six pieces of artillery for position on the west 
bank of the Saint John's. This is more than is necessary, or than I 
ever intended." The major-general commanding adds that " it is not 
his intention to have any guns moved from Saint Augustine at the 

f)resent time." The twenty-six guns referred to by me are doubt- 
ess more than are necessary, unless an attack should be made. As 
such an attack was anticipated, it is not believed that undue prep- 
aration has been made, and I desire to call attention to the facts 
here indicated : 

First. That at Palatka the permanent artillery consists of two 
18-pouuders and one 33-pounder carronade ; total, 3. 



26 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

Second. At Jacksonville : Fort Sammon, one 8-incli sea-coast 
howitzer, one 8-incli siege howitzer, one 24 James, one 8-inch mor- 
tar; total, four. Fort Fribley, one 8-inch naval howitzer, two 
30-pounders, one 8-inch siege howitzer, one 8-inch mortar; total, 
five. Fort Reed, one 8-inch sea-coast howitzer ; one 30-pounder ; 
two 43-pounder carronades ; one mortar ; total, five. Total, four- 
teen. 

March 21, grand total of permanent garrison artillery on north 
bank of Saint John's, seventeen. This excludes four 24-pounder 
howitzers and two 20-pounder Parrotts indicated as a reserve force, 
and not to be put in position unless in case of attack ; also all the 
field batteries in the command. It will be seen that except the 
three 8-inch guns, all these cannon are siege, and can be promptly 
moved wherever the major-general commanding may direct and 
■whenever he may desire. But I would not recommend that any of 
these seventeen guns should be removed unless necessary, as I con- 
sider them a minimum armament. Yet the 8-inch siege howitzers 
and the 30-pounder Parrotts might be supplied by field guns at the 
option of the major-general commanding. 

Of these seventeen guns it may be observed that the two 18- 
pounders, the two 42-pounder carronades, and one 32-pounder car- 
ronade, total five guns, have not been, I believe, employed else- 
where, so that only twelve of what may be considered as the perma- 
nent artillery armament have been really withdrawn from the parks 
elsewhere. I take it for granted that the reserve force, six guns, can 
be taken from here at any moment. 

As to bringing guns from Saint Augustine, I would state that 
there is a very heavy, and in some respects useless, armament at 
Fort Marion, that it cannot be attacked while we hold Palatka and 
Jacksonville, that several iron field guns on Gribeauval carriages 
can be spared from there with the most perfect propriety, and that 
Yellow Bluff requires two such guns, while two more could be so 
placed here as to liberate two field pieces of more importance. 

I understood that these works were to be armed in the most 
economical manner possible. I believe that they will be so armed, 
but ask that the Saint Augustine guns be put to this suggested use 
in order that the best possible security be given to the works on the 
west bank of the Saint John's, which security is absolutely essential. 

And I would add that all except the seventeen guns and mortars 
herein designated, and the old field guns asked from Saint Augus- 
tine, may be removed thereafter at the discretion of the major-gen- 
eral commanding, and without causing the least anxiety on my part 
as to want of efficiency of armament. At present I hardly think the 
removal of any of the captured guns, which will do for reserve, is 
desirable. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

T. SEYMOUR, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



Office op Medical Director, Dist. of Florida, 

Jacksonville, Fla., March 21, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. T. Seymour, 

U. S. Army: 
General : Since I have been at this post I have had conversation 
with various medical officers in regard to the late action at Olustee 



CttAp. XLVnj CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — tTNION. 27 

and am fully convinced that tlie number of men actually rendered 
unserviceable has been greatly exaggerated. The wounds were gen- 
erally very slight and many men left the field who should have 
remained. Only two -capital operations were required, and it is 
probable that not four more cases were proper subjects for opera- 
tion. About 100 men were returned to duty within ten days from 
the general hospital at this post, and one-third of the number of 
wounded should be able to join their regiments within thirty days, 
and the majority of the remainder within sixty days. 

The arrangements in regard to the wounded were good ; over 200 
were at once transferred to the Cosmopolitan, and the remainder 
were comfortably cared for in buildings in Jacksonville and sent as 
rapidly as possible to Hilton Head and Beaufort and to their regi- 
ments as they recovered. 

This communication is made to you unofficially, as I thought you 
would be interested in these facts. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. W. GROSS, 
Surg., U. S. Vols., and Medical Director Dist. of Fla. 



Special Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department of the South, 

No. 123. S Hilton Head, S. C, March 24, 1864. 

******* 

II. Brig. Gen. J. P. Hatch, U. S. Volunteers, is hereby assigned 
to temporary duty in command of the District of Florida, and will 
relieve Brig. Gen. Truman Seymour, U. S. Volunteers. 

Brigadier-General Seymour will turn over the command to Briga- 
dier-General Hatch, with all the records, maps, and correspondence 
relating thereto, and will report in person at these headquarters. 

By command of Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore : 

ED. W. SMITH, 

Liieutenant- Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Hdqrs. District of Florida, Dept. op the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., March 24, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. J. W. Turner, 

Chief of Staff and of Artillery, Dept. of the South : 

General : I have to report as follows : 

First. That on the afternoon of the 31st, some cavalry attacked the 
outposts at Palatka and drove them in. Colonel Barton sent out in- 
fantry, before which the cavalry disappeared. A few guns were 
fired by the Ottawa on this occasion. Nobody hurt. 

Second. A portion of a large and dilapidated building at Palatka 
that I ordered removed has been brought to this place to construct 
a bakery. 

Third. Colonel Barton reports that old settlers here are of opinion 
that the greater part of the cattle in Florida are east of the Saint 
John's River. 

Fourth. The small steamers Hattie Brock and Sumter, captured 
by the navy, are now here. The Sumter would be exceedingly use- 



28 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chip. ILVII. 

f ul as a ferry-boat, &c. , and tlie Brock as a river conveyance instead 
of the Hunter. I have applied to Captain Balch for them, and trust 
tliey may be turned over for our use. 

Fifth. As there is now no small armed vessel in the Saint John's 
(the Columbine, navy tug, having been ordered away), the Harriet 
A. Weed seems essential to our use, and I trust she may be allowed 
to remain here. 

Sixth. The works at this point, Palatka, and Yellow Bluff may 
now be considered effective. No attack is apprehended. 

Seventh. No attempt to interfere with our river communication 
above or below has been made, and the precautions taken are suffi- 
cient, I believe, to save us from that annoyance. 

Eighth. The enemy is under the impression that these forces will 
be soon withdrawn ; that our occupation is only temporary. This 
opinion is referred to or confirmed by the letter from General An- 
derson, in his last communication, copies of which have been for- 
warded. And deserters state that if we remain here their forces 
(now 10,000 to 12,000 infantry and 1,800 or more cavalry) will suffer 
exceedingly during the summer. They say, also, that corn and beef 
are very scarce, and that their horses are breaking down rapidly. 

General Beauregard was at Baldwin a few days since, and I be- 
lieve remains here constantly. Upon the occupation of Palatka, 
some force was moved to Ba,ldwin with a view to operating there. 
Generally, matters go well here. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

T. SEYMOUR, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



Hdqrs, District of Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., March 24, 1864. 
Maj. A. H. Stevens, 

Commanding Light Brigade: 
Major : It is reported to the brigadier-general commanding that, 
during the skirmish of the 1st instant, a sergeant and certain men 
of the Massachusetts cavalry, construing their orders too literally, 
resisted the advance of largely superior numbers, and were finally 
captured, but not before every shot had been expended with such 
courage and skill as to have commanded tlie admiration of the 
enemy. 

It will please the brigadier-general commanding to mention such 
circumstances in general orders, and you are requested to give what- 
ever information you may have, and the names of the party in 
question. * 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

R. M. HALL, .<' 

First Lieut., First U. S. Artillery, Aetg. Asst. Adjt. Gen. 



Hilton Head, S. C, March 25, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff of the Army, Washington, D. C : 
General : Special Orders, No. 121, War Department, directing 
veteran regiments and companies from this department on furlough 

*See General Orders, No. 16, Part I, p. 365. 



Chap. XLVU.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 29 

or to be on furlough, to proceed to Washington, leaves no doubt in 
my mind that it is not the present intention of the Government to 
resume offensive operations on this coast. 

I therefore, in the firm belief that I am acting as the interests of 
the service imperatively demand, recommend that the Tenth Army 
Corps be ordered into the field where it can serve together as a unit, 
and that two or three (or even more) regiments of newly raised 
colored troops be sent here for garrison duty. It might be well to 
leave here, at least temporarily, the Third Rhode Island Heavy Ar- 
tillery and the battalion of Massachusetts cavalry. I should prefer 
to have discretionary power, to act as is deemed best on these points. 
By adopting these views an effective force of 10,000 men, first-rate 
men, too, could take the field. I, of course, desire to go in com- 
mand. 

It has been reported to me that the veterans of the Twenty-fourth 
Massachusetts, who are North as individuals and not as a veteran 
regiment, have been stopped with a view of their being ordered else- 
where. If such be the case the effect on the regiment will be very 
bad indeed. Special Orders, No. 121, does not apply to this case, and 
should not. The point is to take the Tenth Corps intact out gi this 
department. Most of it can go even if no colored troops are sent 
here. But these new troops will do very well to garrison points on 
this coast, while the old troops would doubtless be much superior to 
new ones for active campaign duty. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Q. A. GILLMORE, 

Major- General. 



Washington, D. C, March 36, 1864. 
Major-General Gillmore, 

Department of the South: 
General : Your letter of the 19th is received. General Grant 
directs that all of the available force in your department not re- 
quired to hold your present positions be assembled and prepared for 
orders to another field. The portions of your command now on fur- 
lough at the North have been ordered to rendezvous here to join their 
commands, wherever they may be sent. All available land trans- 
portation will be sent with the treops into the field. Your own des- 
tination has not yet been decided upon. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. W. HALLECK, 
Major-General, Chief of Staff. 



General Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department op the South, 

No. 44. f Hilton Head, S. C, March 26, 1864. 

I. In accordance with orders from the War Department, the First 
and Second Regiments South Carolina and the First Regiment North 
Carolina Volunteers (colored) will hereafter be known and desig- 
nated, respectively, as the Thirty-third, Thirty-fourth, and Thirty- 
fifth Regiments U. S. Colored Troops. 

By command of Mai. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore : 

ED. W. SMITH, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



30 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. (Chap. XLVII. 

Hdqrs. District of Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., March 26, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. J. W. Turner, 

Chief of Staff and of Artillery, Department of the South : 

General : Some of the most intelligent and best disposed of the 
citizens of this place are much exercised lest it may by some possi- 
bility be abandoned, as has thrice been the case already. They have 
sought assurances from me to the contrary. 

I shall be glad to give them the highest possible authority that 
no such abandonment is contemplated or probable, and if you will 
favor me with definite promises on this point it will be a great 
service. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

• T. SEYMOUK, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. District of Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., March 27, 1864. 
Col. W. B. Barton, 

Commanding, Palatka, Fla. : 
Colonel : A refugee just in states that on Wednesday last three 
regiments and some cavalry, comprising Finegan5s and Colquitt's 
command, left for Palatka. Whether this be so or not, you will 
probably have learned defijaitely before this will have reached you. 
With the means at your disposal you are probably quite strong 
enough to resist any a'^sault upon your works, which, however, you 
should not fail to strengthen in every manner possible. The ditch 
of the intrenchments through the oak grove should be dug wide and 
deep enough (beginning at the water's edge) to be a positive obstacle. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

T. SEYMOUR, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



General Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department of the South, 

No. 46. j Hiltoh Head, S. C, March 27, ISei. 

During the absence of Brig. Gen. J. W. Turner, Lieut. Col. C. R. 
Brayton, Third Rhode Island Artillery, is temporarily appointed 
chief of artillery of this department, and will establish his ofiBce at 
these headquarters. 
By command of Mai. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore : 

ED. W. SMITH, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. ^■ 



Engineer Office, Hdqrs. Dept. op the South, 

Hilton Head, S: C, March 29, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Jacksonville, Fla. : 
General : I have the honor to report to you that one of the officers 
of the Engineer Regiment New York Volunteers, who had charge 
of the important engineer depot at Jacksonville, has been abruptly 



Chap. XLVII] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 31 

taken from his duties there and detailed on other than engineer 
duties with Brigadier-General Hatch. No notice of the fact was 
ever communicated to me, and when I went yesterday to attend to 
an important requisition of this ofiBcer I was suddenly apprised of 
his removal. 

I have endeavored for some time past to introduce system and 
order in regard to the collecting, storing, and issuing of engineer 
materials. It is quite a labor to get matters arranged properly. 
Great care has to be observed in selecting the proper officers who 
will attend to the issuing of the tools and materials economically and 
hold those who receive them to strict accountability. But until 
this is done waste, confusion, and inferior work will be the result. 

It is perfectly impossible for me to maintain depots, keep them 
properly provided, and keep myself informed of their contents, if I 
am to be thus interfered Avith and engineer officers removed from their 
stations without either any notice or time given to supply their 
places. The importance of facilitating work at Jacksonville jiist at 
this time renders the affair the more embarrassing. 

I would therefore, general, respectfully request that Lieutenant 
Talcott be ordered to resume his duties at the engineer depot at 
Jacksonville, and if I must lose one of my officers I could better 
spare Lieutenant Van Winkle, One hundred and third New York 
Volunteers, from this office, where I have everything under my own 
eye. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant 

JAMES W. ABERT, 
Major, U. S. Engineers, Assistant Engineer. 

[Indorsement.] 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, March 31, 1864. 

Respectfully referred to General Hatch. 

Lieutenant Van Winkle, One hundred aild third New York Vol- 
unteer Infantry, will be ordered to report to Brigadier-General 
Hatch for duty as aide-de-camp, and General Hatch will, as soon as 
practicable, return Lieutenant Talcott to his duties in charge of 
engineer depot at Jacksonville. 

Q. A. GILLMORE, 

Major- General. 



Washington, D. C, April 1, 1864. 
Major-General Gillmore, 

Department of the South : 
General : Your dispatch of the 25th is received. The object in 
directing the regiments and portions of regiments on furlough from 
your department to rendezvous here is not to separate them from 
their commands, but simply to retain them here till General Grant 
determines -where their commands are to go. If they remain in 
the Department of the South, or go to the Gulf, their men will be 
sent to them there ; if they conae north, these men will meet them 
on the way or join them at their point of debarkation. General 
Grant has gone to Norfolk, and "Will probably decide these ques- 



32 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVH. 

tions on his return. I showed him yesterday your private note in 
regard to taking tlie field with the Tenth Corps. He has not yet 
decided that question. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. W. HALLECK, 
Major-General and Chief of Staff. 



Special Orders, [ Hdqrs.- Department of the South, 

No. 136. I" Hilton Head, S. C, April 1, 1864. 

I. The Third Eegiment New Hampshire Volunteers (mounted 
infantry) will proceed at once to Jacksonville, Fla. , and report to 
Brig. Gen. J. F. Hatch, commanding the District of Florida. They 
will take with them their camp and garrison equipage. The quar- 
termaster's department will furnish transportation. 

II. Company A, Third Ehode Island Heavy Artillery, is hereby 
ordered to be mounted as alight battery, the armament to be four 
12-pounder howitzers. 

By command of Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore : 

ED. W. SMITH, 
Lieutenant- Colonel and Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Hdqrs. District of Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., April 2, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. J. W. Turner, 

Chief of Staff, Dept. of the South, Hilton Head, S. C. : 
General : On examining a young man who has come to-day 
through the enemy's lines I -got the following information, which I 
am inclined to put some faith in : 

The enemy's number in our front is about 10,000, 1,000 of whom 
are at Baldwin throwing u^ intrenchments, the remainder encamped 
at McGirt's Creek. An outpost of two regiments of cavalry and 
one of infantry is established at Cedar Creek, a few pickets east of 
the creek. General Anderson is in command, assisted by Generals 
Finegan and Colquitt. Generals Taliaferro and Gardner are at 
Baldwin, but have no commands and are to return to Charleston. 

Baldwin is being strongly fortified. The works were laid out by 
General Beauregard, and are still incomplete. General Colquitt's 
troops have been under marching orders for two weeks. The force 
opposite Palatka is small ; our force there much exaggerated, it 
being believed that our main force is there. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. .< 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

FoUy Island, 8. C, April 3, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. A. Schimmelfennig, 

Commanding U. S. Forces, Folly Island, S. C. : 
General: I am directed' by the brigadier-general commanding 
to request that you will forward to these headquarters as soon as 
practicable a report of the events of principal importance in this 



Chap. XLvn.] COBKESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 33 

vicinity during the past month, including such information as you 
have been able to collect in regard to the movements of the enemy 
in our front and the force opposed to us, the position of their camps, 
&c. To this you will please add such further information as you may 
possess in regard to the works thrown up for the defense of Charles- 
ton, whether within the city limits or within its neighborhood, their 
usual garrison, the guns mounted in them, and in general such other 
items as you may deem of any military importance, the description 
of the localities to be, so far as possible, illustrated by maps. You 
will also please include in this report all changes in your own troops, 
and a list of the earth-works and fortifications within your com- 
mand, with a brief sketch of the work performed upon them during 
the month of March. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

ADEIAN TERRY, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Seabrook, Hilton Head, S. C, April 3, 1864. 
Maj. T. B. Brooks, 

Aide-de-Camp : 

Major : I have the honor most respectfully to submit the follow- 
ing statement as to a verbal order received by me from Maj. John 
W. Hicks in relation to the arrest of a naval officer belonging to the 
ship Vermont : 

On or about the 5th day of February, 1864, Maj. John W. Hicks 
ordered me to put on my sword and proceed with my horse to 
Elliott's plantation (which is about 1\ miles from this place) and 
order a naval officer to report to his (the major's) headquarters, 
and if he refused to come to bring him. I immediately proceeded 
and found the officer seated near the beach. 

I told the officer that Major Hicks ordered me to order him (the 
naval officer) to report to his (the major's) headquarters. He asked, 
"Where is the major's headquarters ? " I replied, " At Seabrook," 
when he, with one erf his men, came with me, I walking my horse, 
conversing with him, until within about 300 yards of Seabrook, 
when I galloped into camp. By the time I put up my horse the 
officer had arrived and was conversing with the major in my office. 
I did not pay any attention to the conversation, but from what I did 
hear the major treated him very courteously.* 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WILLIAM S. MOORHEAD, 
Second Lieutenant, Seventy -Sixth Pennsylvania Vols. 



Headquarters District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, Fla., April 3, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. J. W. Turner, 

Chief of Staff and of Artillery, Dept. of the South : 
General : A dispatch received this day from Colonel Barton, 
commanding at Palatka, reports that all is quiet at that place. A 
detachment of the One hundred and fifteenth New York Volunteers, 

* For other correspondence upon this subject see Part I. 
3 R R— VOL XXXV, FT II 



34 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

under command of Capt. S. P. Smith, was sent up the river 34 
miles. They surprised and captured a picket of 1 sergeant and 9 
men, with arms and equipments complete, and 13 horsQ3. The afifair 
was admirably conducted, and Captain Smith is deserving a com- 
mendation for the energy and good judgment displayed. Unfortu- 
nately the enemy have captuied a picket of 1 sergeant and 3 pri- 
vates of the Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry, immediately in front of 
Palatka. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



Washington, D. C, April 4, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore, 

department of the South: 

General : Lieutenant-General Grant directs that you move, with 
all possible dispatch, so much of your forces as in your judgment 
can be safely spared from the Department of the South to Fort 
Monroe, Va., and report to Maj. Gen. B. F. Butler, who will have 
orders in regard to your future operations. You will turn over 
the Department of the South, and the troops which you may deem 
necessary to leave there, to Brig. Gen. J. P, Hatch. You will 
be joined at Fort Monroe by the regiments and fractions of regi- 
ments belonging to the Department of the South which have been 
on furlough at the North and are now rendezvousing here prepara- 
tory to their return to your command. The troops which you bring 
with you and those which join you at Fort Monroe will constitute 
the Tenth Army Corps. 

You will bring with you their arms, baggage, and transportation. 
Fractional portions, now North, of such regiments as you may leave 
in the Department of the South, will be sent by you from Fort Mon- 
roe to their proper commands in the South. Of course the arms, 
baggage, &c., or such parts of organizations will not be brought 
north. The selection of the troops to be brought north for active 
operations in the field is left entirely to your own judgment. The 
lieutenant-general, however, expects, from your own reports, that 
your effective command, on its arrival at Fort Monroe, will be from 
7,000 to 11,000 men. This corps, increased by such forces as we may 
be able to give it, will be commanded by you in the field. 

General Grant hopes that your command will reach Fort Monroe 
by the 18th instant ; if not by that time, as soon thereafter as possi- 
ble. The troops should arrive ready in every respect for the field. 

Apply to Major-General Butler for such supplies as you may re- 
quire. Should he not be able to meet your requisitions, telegraph 
immediately, on ascertaining that fact, to the proper departments in 
Washington. 

The Twenty-sixth U. S. Colored and the Twenty-ninth Con- 
necticut Colored Regiments will be immediately sent to the Depart- 
ment of the South ; they number about 900 each. Possibly another 
colored regiment will be sent to that department, but do not rely pn 
it. General Meigs is collecting vessels to assist in bringing up your 
forces and their transportation. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. W. HALLECK, 
Major-General, Chief of Staff. 



Chap. XLVn.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 35 

[Indorsement.] 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, April 17, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. A. H. Terry, on assuming temporary command of the 
Tenth Army Corps, will proceed to organize the corps into brigades 
and divisions, agreeably to the programme arranged at these head- 
quarters, and will see that the wants of the troops are promptly sup- 
plied, agreeably to the within instructions. 

Q. A. GILLMORE, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, 8. C, April 4, 1864. 
Lieut. Col. M. R. Morgan, 

Chief Com. of Subsistence, Hilton Head, 8. C. : 
Colonel : I am instructed by the major-general commanding to 
acknowledge the receipt of your communication of this date, sug- 
gesting that the troops at Fernandina and Saint Augustine furnish 
themselves with fresh meat, &c., and to inform you that the follow- 
ing indorsement has been placed thereon : 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hiltmi Head, S. C, April 4, 1864. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Morgan's recommendation is approved, and* is referred to the 
commanding officer of the District of Florida for his mformation. It is presumed 
that the supply of fresh beef must all come from the country east of Saint John's 
River ; for the present it had better be collected by one party, under the immediate 
control of the district commander, the supply for Saint Augustine and Fernan- 
dina to be sent to the latter place in transports. There are plenty of opportunities 
to send from Fernandina to Saint Augustme. 

Q. A. GILLMORE, 

Major-Oeneral. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ISRAEL R. SEALY, 
Capt., Forty-seventh New York Vols., Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen. 



Hdqrs. District of Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., April 4, 1864. 
Col. W. B. Barton, 

Commanding at Palatka : 
Colonel : The general commanding directs me to acknowledge 
the receipt of your letter of the 3d instant. Please convey to Cap- 
tain Smith and his command his thanks for the skill shown by them 
in their late expedition, which will be acknowledged in general 
orders.* 

The general is not of opinion that any large force of infantry or 
artillery is in front of your position. From the most reliable infor- 
mation obtained, he is induced to believe that the force consists of 
the Fifth Georgia Cavalry, one company of Florida cavalry, one 

*See General Orders, No. 19, Part I, p. 383. 



36 



8. C, FLA,, AND ON THE GA. COAST. 



[Chaf. XLVn. 



regiment of infantry, and some light guns, the number not known. 
The gun-boats are constantly patrolling the river, and a t)attalion of 
infantry in boats watching its west bank. 

There are no shells here for the 18-pounders. A requisition has 
been forwarded for them. Major Stevens will probably arrive op- 
posite your post with his cavalry to-morrow. Let the Weed convoy 
the steamers on their return trips to the gun-boat lying below the 
flats. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

R. M. HALL, 
First Lieut, First U. 8. Arty., Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen. 



Special Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department of the South, 

No. 140. i Hilton Head, S. C, April 4, 1864. 

I. The Second Battalion of the Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry will 
proceed immediately to Hilton Head and report to Col. J. B. Howell, 
commanding district. The quartermaster's department will furnish 
transportation. 

* * * * in if ■ ^e 

By command of Mai. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore : 

ED. W. SMITH, 

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Washington, D. C, April 5, 1864. 
Major-General Gillmore : 

General : I send you the list of veteran regiments which have 
up to this date rendezvoused here, viz : 



Command. 


Aggre- 
gate. 


Character of arms. 


39th lUinois (ten companies) 


530 
4ti0 
435 
485 
46 
350 


Springfield rifles. 

Do. 
Springfield and Austrifm rifles. 
Springfield rifles. 


85th Ohio (nine companies) 

6ad Ohio (detachntent) 


67th Ohio (ten companies) 




24th Massachusetts (detacfunent) . . .'. 


Do 







In addition, there are recruits for nearly all the regiments in the 
Department of the South, numbering about 1,500, now arriving 
here. 

Please give Captain Smith a list of the regiments you propose leav- 
ing in the Department of the South ; it is possible the detachments 
and recruits for them may be forwarded to Hilton Head while the 
Tenth Corps is coming north. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. C. KELTON, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters of the Army, 

[April 5, 1864]. 
Confidential memorandum for General Meigs : 
General Grant has directed General Gillmore, with about 10,000 
men, to report at Fort Monroe. I understand that General Gillmore 



Chap. XLTD.] COBEESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 37 

has water transportation for about 5,000 ; consequently he must 
make two trips, unless vessels can be sent to him from the North. 
There are two colored regiments (1,800 men) at Annapolis to be sent 
to South Carolina, and a third will probably be ready in about a 
week. Can vessels be sent with these and bring back Gillmore's 
command ? Can any vessels be sent for troops to Department of 
the South ? 

Please give memorandum to Captain Scott, or see me before 3 
o'clock. 

H. W. HALLECK, 
Major-General, Chief of Staff. 



Quaetermastkr-Genekal's Office, 

April 5, 1864—2.30 p. m. 
Major Van Vliet, 

Quartermaster, New York : 
SiE : It is reported that the Cahawba, Fulton, United States, El 
Cid, Weybosset, are in New York. Send one of them to Annapolis 
to transport colored troops thence to Port Royal. Prepare the rest 
to sail for Port Royal, fully coaled and watered, as soon as the storm 
is over. They will receive orders from General Gillmore on arrival. 
Report any other steamers at New York, or arriving, with their 
capacity, and report capacity of vessels sailing under this order, and 
time of sailing. 

M. C. MEIGS, 
Quartermaster-General. 



Quartermaster-General's Office, 

Washington, April 5, 1864 — 3 p. m. 
Lieut. Col. H. Biggs, 

Chief Quartermaster, Fort Monroe : 
Sir : Send the Spaulding to Annapolis immediately to take a col- 
ored regiment thence to Hilton Head. Have you any other steamer 
fit for this purpose to go with her ? The steamer should not leave 
the Chesapeake until the storm is over, and should have coal and 
water to go farther, after reaching Hilton Head, where they will 
report to General Gillmore for further orders. 

M. C. MEIGS, 
QuarterTnaster- General. 



Fort Moneoe, Va., April 5, 1864—6.30 p. m. 

(Received 12 m., 6th.) 
Brig. Gen. M. C. Meigs, 

Quartermaster^General : 
Your telegram received. Spaulding is at New Berne. Storm 
renders it impossible for any vessel to go to Annapolis. I have the 
Montauk and two other similp;r propellers, that have come in for 
shelter. They can go to sea and carry 800 men. General Butler 
would like to know when he can count on return of his transporta- 
tion. I will telegraph you as soon as storm will admit of any vessel 



38 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVII. 

leaving for Annapolis. What we have in harbor not capable of 
going to sea. Please inform me how many troops there are in the 
regiment at Annapolis, and whether I shall send the propellers as 
soon as storm subsides. No indications of its subsiding. 

HERMAN BIGGS, 
Lieutenant- Colonel, Quartermaster. 



Hdqrs. Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania Vols., 

Seabrook, S. C, April 5, 1864. 
Maj. T. B. Brooks, 

Aide-de-Camp : 
Sir : From the limited evidence I have been able to get in rela- 
tion to statements of Major Hicks and Lieutenant Moorhead, I am 
inclined to think that Lieutenant Moorhead is correct, but believe 
the actions of naval officer were reported to Major Hicks as being 
an aggravated case. 

I have the honor to be, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. C. CAMPBELL, 
Colonel Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers. 



Hdqrs. District of Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., April 5, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. J. W. Turner, 

Chief of Staff .and Artillery, Headquarters 

Department of the South, Hilton Head, S. C. : 
General : I. inclose with this a circular, issued by my order, 
which will, I think, have the effect of bringing in deserters from 
the enemy. 

All the ponies brought in will be needed as pack animals when 
our cavalry commence moving. I hope the promise to purchase the 
animals will be approved by the general commanding, and the quar- 
termaster here will be furnished with the funds necessary to pay for 
them. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 

LInclosure.] 

Circular.] Office of the Provost-Marshal, 

District of Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., April 4, 1864. 

All refugees from the rebel lines and deserters from the rebel 
armies, and all persons desiring to become such, are hereby informed 
that they will not under any circumstances be compelled to serve in 
the U. S. Army against the rebels. This assurance is fully given 
in General Orders, No. 64, of date February 18, 1864, from the War. 
Department. 

AH such refugees and deserters who are honest in their inten- 
tions of forever deserting the rebel cause will be allowed every 
opportunity of engaging in their usual avocations ; or, if they desire 



Chap. XLVn.l CORRESPONDENCE, ETC, — UNION. 39 

employment from the United States, will, as far as expedient, be 
employed on the Government works, receiving proper compensa- 
tion for their services. 

Air refugees or deserters who may bring horses or mules into the 
Union lines will be paid their full value. 

T. A. HENDERSON, 
Lieut. Col. and Provost-Marshal, Dist. of Florida. 



Headquarters U. S. Forces, 

Falatka, Ma., April 5, 1864. 
Lieut. R. M. Hall, 

First Lieut., First U. 8. Arty., Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen.: 

Lieutenant ; I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of 
your communication of this date, and to state that I have conveyed 
to Captain Smith the very complimentary message of the brigadier- 
general commanding the district. 

Everything here since my last has been quiet with the exception 
of occasional demonstrations against the pickets, which nave 
resulted in no harm to us. I sent the Weed this morning up the 
Saint John's for the purpose of destroying several flats and other 
boats, which she succeeded in doing without any difficulty. The 
wharf on the east bank of the Saint John's is progressing rapidly, 
and I hope to have it completed this week; meanwhile I have 
arranged to cross Major Stevens' command over at a point farther 
up where the steamer can approach very near the shore. 

I have directed the Houghton and Mary Benton to be sent to 
Jacksonville at daylight, in order that they may be available for 
any purpose required to-morrow p. m. The Weed conveys them to 
the flats. 

I would respectfully call the attention of the commanding general 
to the inclosed communication from Lieutenant Avery, acting com- 
missary of subsistence, showing our status as to supplies. We are 
also greatly in need of clothing, of which we have none, many of 
the men being ragged in the extreme. Requisitions for both sup- 
plies and clothing are already in. 

I send to the district provost-marshal 2 prisoners of war, recently 
captured by Captain Smith, one of them a scout belonging to Dick- 
ison's company; also Captains Cabell and Tumblin, in regard to 
whose crossing the lines I recently spoke to the commanding gen- 
eral. I think that they (the- latter) should be sent to Hilton Head, 
and detained there until the information of which they have 
undoubtedly become possessed shall have grown old. 

I have the honor to be, lieutenant, very respectfully, your obe- 
dient servant, 

W. B. BARTON, 
Colonel Forty-eighth New York Volunteers, Comdg. 



Headquarters U. S. Forces, 

Morris Island, S. C, April 6, 1864. 
Capt. Adrian Terry, 

Asst. Adjt. Gen., Northern Dist, Dept. of the South: 
Captain : In answer to your communication of the 3d instant, re- 
questing me to forward to your headquarters a report of the events 



40 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. TChap. XLVH. 

of principal military interest in this vicinity during tlie past month, 
including such information as I have been able to collect in regard 
to the movements of the enemy in our front, the force opposed to us, 
the position of their camps, &c., I have the honor to submit the fol- 
lowing : 

During the past month I have learned but little in addition to the 
information I already possessed and have communicated to you con- 
cerning the situation and strength of the enemy's forces in my im- 
mediate front. Colquitt's brigade, which was formerly encamped 
on James Island, near Secessionville, went to Florida with Beaure- 
gard in January, and has not yet returned. The troops at present 
on the island are Hagood's brigade, not over 3,000 strong, and a 
regiment or two besides. On Sullivan's Island there is less than a 
brigade (some 2,000 men), under command of Colonel Keitt. Not 
more than a regiment is seen drilling at any time on the beach. 
There is one battalion in the city of Charleston. Sumter, James 
Island, Mount Pleasant, and Charleston are all connected by sub- 
marine cables. There are but few pickets on the water front of the 
city. The only points at which sentries are stationed, as far as I can 
learn, are at the foot of Tradd Street, at Chisolm's Mills, and at two 
small batteries and one wharf on Cooper River. They have three 
iron-clads afloat, four guns in each. One of them is the Chicora, 
whose machinery is out of order and is in dry-dock being repaired. 
The garrison in Sumter consists of from 250 to 300 men, artillery 
and infantry, and is changed every fifteen days. 

The enemy is strengthening Castle Pinckney, which now mounts 
thi'ee 10-inch columbiads and one rifle, and Ripley mounts two guns. 
They talk of mounting a gun at Sumter for the purpose of firing at 
our calcium light at Gregg. The "big gun" in Charleston is 
mounted on Frazer's wharf, and not long ago a solid shot was fired 
from it as far as Castle Pinckney ; shell a good deal farther. 

I learn from deserters that after the destruction of the blockade- 
runner Presto on the 2d of February the troops on Sullivan's Island 
got hold of the liquor on board of her and had a "grand drunk," 
and it is alleged that 300 men at that time could have taken the 
island, but unfortunately it was not known until the opportunity 
had passed. 

During the month of March I find the following work to have 
been done and alterations made on rebel batteries in and around 
Charleston Harbor : 

The northeast front of Battery Marshall, on the east end of Sulli- 
van's Island, has been strengthened with sand and sod and the maga- 
zines repaired. There is now being built a parapet on the sea front 
and they have one pivot gun in position on that face. They seem to 
be changing somewhat this battery so as to give it more command 
over Long Island. 

There has been no visible change in the three two-gun batteries ' 
between Marshall and Beauregard. 

A new traverse has been built at the west end of Fort Beauregard, 
behind which, I think, a gun has been mounted. A new gun (a 
columbiad, I think) has been mounted near the center of the fort. 
There has been considerable work done just to the rear of the spot 
where the Moultrie House stood, but it has not assumed sufiicient 
shape to determine what they intend building, but I presume a mor- 
tar battery. Near this place two platforms have been built on which 
are two pieces of light artillery. 



Chip. XLVn.l CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 41 

A little to their right there is a small work built wholly of sand 
and thought to mount two mortars. Still further to the right is an- 
other small work on which there have been built three traverses 
and in which one columbiad has been dismounted and a gun, sup- 
posed to be a rifle, mounted in its place. 

At Fort Moultrie the parapet has been strengthened, the ditch 
deepened, two columbiads dismounted on the east end of the fort, 
and two rifles mounted in their places. 

The traverses in the two batteries west of the Moultrie, which 
were built of sand bags, were torn down and rebuilt with sand and 
sod, and the three-gun battery some distance to the west of these 
has been rebuilt in the same manner. 

On the northeast corner of Sumter a traverse has been built with 
sand bags, either to protect guns mounted on the lower tier of case- 
mates or to cover mortars mounted behind it. Quite a considerable 
amount of railroad iron has been stuck up around the same cor- 
ner, close down to the water. The southeast corner of the fort has 
been strengthened with sand bags and palmetto, and the bomb-proof 
at the southwest corner with sand and sand bags. On the south 
face, about midway between the top of the fort and the water, a 
line of posts has been planted, about 10 feet apart, extending "the 
full length of the wall, and we discovered to-day that these posts 
are the supports of a wire fence. 

The enemy is building a new battery in the swamp, some distance 
to the west and front of the Mount Pleasant House. It is con- 
structed of logs and turf to the height of about 6 feet, and they are 
completing it with sand which they haul from the beach. No guns 
are yet in position, but I believe it is intended for a three-gun bat- 
tery. 

A great amount of work has been done at Castle Pinckney in the 
past month, but it is not yet possible to tell the object of it. There 
has been a large amoxint.of sand and turf carried inside the fort, 
and from present appearances they have commenced a wall of sand 
and turf within the original wall of the fort. 

At Fort Ripley there has also been considerable work done. The 
magazines and traverses which were made of sand bags haye been 
covered with sand and turfed over. Lately there have beeii seven 
schooner loads of sand used in this work. 

The battery on the northeast wharf of Charleston has been turfed 
and one gun mounted on it. 

Fort Johnson has been turfed and the large bomb-proof west of 
the fort is now being so repaired. A garrison has lately taken up 
quarters inside the fort. 

One new gun has been mounted on Battery Simkins, but no other ■ 
work has been done on it, except repairing the damage done by our 
shells. At the battery next on the right of it barracks have been 
built for a garrison. A little beyond a new battery has been lately 
commenced, which is progressing rapidly. Between this point and 
Secessionville there has been no work done on the batteries except a 
little repairing and dressing of slopes. 

One gun has been mounted in a battery just at the edge, of Seces- 
sionville and a garrison placed on it. 

The officer in charge of the engineers reports the following amount 
of engineer work done on the forts and batteries on Morris Island, 
during the month of March ; At Fort Putnam about 30 yards of 
palisading, washed away by the high tides, have been reset and the 



42 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. (Chap. XLVII. 

damage done by the enemy's fire to the slopes and magazines re- 
paired. At Battery Chatfield the inclosure of palisading has been 
completed and the gates put up ; revetment around magazine to the 
300-pounder and mortar batteries has been repaired ; sand ridge in 
front of gun No. 2 has been graded and a flag-staff has been put up. 
The embrasure of gun No. 2 has been enlarged so as to allow it to 
fire on Moultrie ; a platform for morter shells has been laid ; the 
platform to 100-pounder has been raised and leveled ; the embrasure 
of the 300-pounder has been enlarged so as to enable it to fire on 
Sumter and timbers have been put under them. 

At Fort Shaw the slopes have been graded and dressed with ma- 
nure ; two gates have been put up and the sand ridge north of the 
fort has been graded. 

The work on Fort Putnam and Battery Chatfield is now completed. 
A number of stockades are still to be set at Fort Shaw and the grad- 
ing of the sand ridge north of it completed. The stockades are cut 
at Kiawah Island and await transportation. 

On Morris Island, including the little work on Black Island, there 
are ten forts and batteries, namely : 

No. 1. Fort Strong, mounting twenty-one guns and mortars, rang- 
ing from 12-pounder field pieces to the 200-pounder Parrott, with a 
garrison of 4 officers and 133 men. 

No. 2. Fort Putnam, mounting ten guns, ranging from a 12-pounder 
howitzer to a 200-pounder Parrott, with a garrison of 5 officers and 
100 men. 

No. 3. Battery Chatfield and 10-inch columbiad battery, the former 
mounting two 100-pounder and one 300-pounder Parrotts and the 
latter four 10-inch sea-coast mortars and two 10-inch columbiads. 

No. 4. Battery Seymour, Battery Barton, and 13-inch mortar bat- 
tery, the former mounting four 10-inch sea-coast mortars, the second 
the same as the first, and the third two 13-inch mortars. The garri- 
son is composed of 2 officers and 39 men. 

No. 5. Fort Shaw, mounting two 10-inch siege mortars and two 8- 
inch sea-coast howitzers, with a garrison of 3 officers and 159 men. 

No. 6. Battery Purviance, mounting two 42-pounders smooth-bore 
and two 30-pounder Parrotts, with a garrison of 1 officer and 49 
men. ' 

No. 7. On Black Island there are mounted on the little work one 
12-pounder Wiard gun and one 12-pounder howitzer, with 1 officer 
and a detachment of 10 men to take charge of the guns. 

During the month of March the only change which occurred in 
the troops at this post was the removal of Company B, Third Rhode 
Island Heavy Artillery, to Hilton Head. Their place has been sup- 
plied by a detail of- men accustomed to the use of heavy guns from 
the Eleventh Maine Volunteers. I am now about changing the 
location of camps in pursuance of orders received from your head- 
quarters. 

A close watch is kept on the movements of the enemy on the 
neighboring islands and in Charleston, and I receive a report at 
night of what has taken place during the day. Five hundred men, 
with the proper number of commissioned and non-commissioned 
officers, are sent to the front every evening at sundown and remain 
on duty for the night under .the direction of a general officer of t'he 
day and a field officer of the trenches. They are posted at Strong, 
the batteries above (both sides of the island being picketed between 
Strong and Putnam), and at the left batteries. I have also placed 



Chap. XLVU.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 43 

sentries on the eastern beach as low down as the Beacon House, 
where a constant guard is maintained day and night. In addition 
to this the boat infantry, in thirteen picket-boats, sentinel the har- 
bor of Charleston every night. With this precaution it seems im- 
possible for an enemy to approach without our getting notice in 
time to prepare to repel him. I believe the night duty, both on 
land and water, to be performed with commendable vigilance. The 
picket-boats are also stationed between Black Island and Seces- 
sionville, and there is one on duty every night in the creek 500 
yards in advance of the Swamp Angel, toward Battery Simkins, on 
James Island. 

Besides the ordinary camp and provost-marshal's guards, I main- 
tain a post guard of sufficient strength to guard public property and 
maintain order outside of the camps. I have instituted the prac- 
tice of compelling the quartermaster to turn out all his public trans- 
portation, including carts, wagons, horses, and mules, on Sunday 
morning for inspection, which I think has a beneficial effect and 
will insure greater care of this description of public property. 

I should have mentioned at the proper place that the Swamp 
Angel was dismantled during the month of March and the two 
10-inch mortars in position there were removed. The ordnance offi- 
cer is now engaged removing the pieces of the 200-pounder Parrott 
which burst in that battery during the bombardment last summer. 

We had but one gun to burst in March, the 30-pounder Parrott at 
Putnam, which was used to fire upon Charleston. It " gave up the 
ghost" at the 4,615th round, a remarkable number of shots to be 
fired from a single piece of ordnance. 

In obedience to orders from your headquarters, I have caused ra- 
tions to be stored in the bomb-proofs at Strong and Putnam and 
under cover in Fort Shaw. A part of the small ammunition has 
been delivered at each place and the balance shall be put in as soon 
as it shall have arrived from Hilton Head. 

I have hot been able to procure casks for water at these forts, but 
have caused wells to be dug which probably can be made to answer 
the purpose. For a considerable time there has been great irregu- 
larity in the delivery of wood from Small Island and sometimes the 
troops have had none to cook with, and I was compelled to draw 
from the quantity I had stored away in Fort Strong. I would sug- 
gest that the steamboat Philadelphia be detailed, if practicable, to 
transport wood, as it is the best adapted to that purpose. 

From some deserters who reached the fleet two weeks ago, and 
whom the commodore was kind enough to send to me for examina- 
tion, I learn some information about Mount Pleasant which is not 
unimportant. Mount Pleasant is a long, narrow peninsula, with the 
Wando River on the one side and the narrow water-courses which 
run around behind Moultrie on the other, and is several miles in 
length. The only troops on it are two light batteries, stationed at 
the lower point, near the village, close to timber. 

About 7 miles up the peninsula is a low breast-work thrown up 
across from water to water, with a small battery on the right, but 
there are no guns mounted nor is any force stationed there except a 
small picket -in the battery. From that point all the way down to 
Mount Pleasant village there is a good road, but no pickets or guards 
on it. These parties took a boat a few hundred yards above this bat- 
tery, and, following the water-courses, came out through the inlet to 
the east of Dewees without being challenged by either pickets on the 



44 S. C, PLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVU. 

water or on shore. They report that it is practicable for a hoat ex- 
pedition to make a landing above the battery referred to without 
opposition, and by a quick movement capture the batteries at Mount 
Pleasant. 

I neglected to mention that Mount Pleasant is connected with 
Sullivan's Island by a bridge a mile long, and that once burned or 
even a portion of it destroyed there is no connection between the 
two, as the swamps are impassable. I am not at present [prepared] 
to send any maps descriptive of the localities mentioned, but will 
forward them hereafter if I can have them drawn. 

Hoping this report may be satisfactory to the brigadier-general 
commanding the district, I have the honor to remain, very respect- 
fully, your obedient servant. 

W. W. H. DAVIS, 
Colonel lOilh Pennsylvania Vols., Comdg. Post. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, April 6, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. J. P. Hatch, 

Commanding District of Florida, Jacksonville, Fla. : 
General : I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your com- 
munication of the 3d instant, addressed to the chief of staff, report- 
ing the success of the scouting party under Capt. S. P. Smith, One 
hundred and fifteenth New York Volunteers. I am instructed by 
the major-general commanding to direct that you express his thanks 
to Captain Smith for the zeal and ability displayed by him on that 
occasion. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ED. W. SMITH, 
Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Hdqrs. District of Florida, Dept. op the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., April 6, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. J. W. Turner, 

Chief of Staff and AHy., Dept. of the South, Hilton Head, S. C: 
General : I have nothing of importance to communicate. A 
rumor having been circulated within the enemy's lines that an at- 
tempt will be made to sink torpedoes in the channel near Saint 
John's Bluff, I have determined to build a block-house at that point 
and establish a small force in it. 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



Special Orders, | Hdqrs. "Department op the South, 

No. 144. j Hilton Head, S. C, April 6, 1864. 

4: « * 4< 4: 4: 4: 

III. The Ninth Regiment U. S. Colored Troops, now at Beaufort, 
S. C, will proceed without delay to Hilton Head and report to the 
post commander. The quartermaster's department will furnish 
transportation. 

* * *"■ * *.* * 

By command of Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore : 

ED. W. SMITH, 
Lieutenant- Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Chap. XLVU.] COKKESPONDENOE, ETC. — UNION. 45 

• Headquarters *[J. S. Forces, 

Falatka, Fla., April 7, 1864. 
Lieut. R. M. Hall, 

First Lieut., First U. S. Arty., A. A. A. G.: 
Sir : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your com- 
munication of this date. Major Stevens, with the remainder of his 
command, arrived opposite this place yesterday, and was brought 
across the river without difficulty before night. 

The wharf on the east side of the river will be available to-mor- 
row, although it will not be entirely completed for two or three 
days. I have myself heard to-day the rumor you mentioned in re- 
gard to Finegan's command. I expect to know its destination in 
time to advise you by next opportunity. Rumors are very current 
outside our lines of a battery now being erected between this place 
and Jacksonville. I am endeavoring to become better informed on 
this subject also. 
The persons spoken of in my last go down in the morning. 
I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

W. B. BARTON, . 
Colonel iSth New York Vols., Commanding. 



Hdqrs. District op Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., April 7, 1864. 
Col. W. B. Barton, 

Commanding at Palatka, Fla. : 
Colonel : The brigadier-general commanding directs me to ac- 
knowledge receipt of your communication of the 5th instant. 

All the clothing that could be spared has been sent to you ; more 
is expected daily, and will be forwarded without delay. The briga- 
dier-general will endeavor to keep you well supplied [with] subsist- 
ence stores and will send you a supply of forage as soon as possible. 
He cannot be positive whether General Finegan's command has 
gone up to Palatka or not ; some say he has, and that he left three 
days ago, but the general is inclined to doubt it. The 2 prisoners of 
war referred to in your letter have not arrived. A list of the 
wounded, &c. , in the hands of the enemy since the battle of Olustee, 
will be sent to you by the next opportunity. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

R. M. HALL, 
First Lieut., 1st U. S. Arty., Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen. 



Hdqrs. District op Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., April 8, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore, 

Commanding Department of the South : 
General ; There is great uncertainty felt by the citizens of Flor- 
ida about the troops remaining in the State. I did not ask the ques- 
tion of you when I was at Hilton Head, as I did not think at the 
time there could be any doubt of it. From General Seymour, when 
I arrived here, I learned that he had not been sufficiently certain on 



46 g. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Caip. XLVn. 

the subject to enable him to assure the people that they would not 
again be abandoned. I feel that a decided policy should be adopted, 
and that immediately. If it is the intention to hold the positions we 
now have and endeavor to bring the people back to be loyal citizens 
I must 'be authorized to tell them they will be protected. Without 
protection we cannot expect loyalty. They are tired of the war, and, 
assured of protection, would, I believe, soon become loyal. I judge 
by what I know of the people living between the Saint John's and 
the coast. They feel comparatively safe from the incursions of the 
enemy, and are nearly all interested in supporting the Government. 
Their young men in the army take every opportunity to desert, and 
all declare they will not again be found in arms against the Govern- 
ment. I believe they most of them intend faithfully to keep their 
oath of allegiance. Assure those west of this river that this time 
they are not to be deserted and we will soon have all Southern 
Florida returned to its allegiance. The inhabitants of Marion 
County, South Carolinians by birth, may give us some trouble, but 
they will be so outnumbered that they will be forced to submit or 
leave the State. The raising of Florida troops, not to leave the State, 
will assist us much in bringing back a good state of feeling, and the 
organizing a State government at as early a day as possible ^ouJd 
not be lost sight of. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



CULPEPBR COUKT-HOUSE, Va., Jpril 9, 1864—10 p. m. 

(Received 3 p. m., 10th.) 

Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff: 
Will you please ascertain if General F. P. Blair is to be sent to 
General Sherman ? If not, an army corps commander will have to 
be named for the Fifteenth Corps. I would much sooner have Gen- 
eral Hunter or Buell at Memphis than Hurlbut, and General Sher- 
man is not willing to try Hurlbut in the field again. 

U. S. GRANT, 
Lieutenant-General, 



Hdqbs. District of Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., April 9, 1864. 

Brig. Gen John W. Turner, 

Chief of Staff, Hdqrs. Department of the South : 
General ; When General Gillmore was here it was thought 
proper that a steamer should be constantly at Palatka. The Hunter 
was detailed for that purpose. I am now about sending to that 
vicinity Henry's Light Brigade, and the Hunter will be needed" to 
transport forage and provisions. A boat will be more tha,n ever 
needed at Palatka. To enable the cavalry to act with^ effect it will 
be necessary to be able at any time to transfer them with rapidity 
from one side of the river to the other. For this purpose I need a 



Chap. XLVII.l CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 47 

ferry-boat, of which I am told there are two at Port Royal. I con- 
sider one absolutely necessary for the service and trust that the gen- 
eral commanding will agree with me and direct the chief quarter- 
master to transfer one early in the coming week. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. District of Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., April 9, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. John W. Turner, 

Chief of Staff, Hdqrs. Department of the South : 

General: Since my last nothing of interest has occurred. A 
steamer yesterday from Palatka reports everything quiet in that 
vicinity. The force of the enemy there has not been increased, and 
their position has been ascertained. I have sent up by land all re- 
mainder of the Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry, four companies of 
the Third New Hampshire Mounted Infantry, and propose sending 
the whole of Henry's Light Brigade to operate above Palatka in the 
direction of Gainesville and south of it in Marion County. 

I think that in the latter county we will find quite a number of 
blacks, although I am informed that many have been sent into 
Georgia. I sent yesterday a flag to the enemy's lines with two 
women, wives of soldiers in the rebel army. I sent by the flag 
some newspapers to General Anderson. One of the officers said to 
Major Eddy that he would give him one of their papers; went to the 
rear and procured the paper, but Major Davant prevented his giving 
it to him. The major thought from his manner that it contained 
news that might be of interest to us. I yesterday sent a faithful 
scout to the west of Baldwin to watch the railroad and bring in 
word of any movement of troops on that route. Their pickets have 
been strengthened, it may be to prevent desertions, which have been 
so numerous lately. If there is any reduction of their force in 
my front it cannot be long concealed from me. The gun-boat Una- 
dilla has been added to the squadron in the river ; the Pawnee will 
remain at least two weeks longer. A few of the circulars, a copy 
of which was forwarded you, have been got through the lines of the 
enemy. 

A steamer goes up to-day to the wreck of the Maple Leaf. An 
eifort will be made to recover some of her equipment, anchors, &c. 

To-morrow I purpose going to Saint Augustine ; will return on 
Monday. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters District of West Florida, 

Barrancas, April 10, 1864. 
Commodore W. Smith, 

Commanding, Navy-Yard^, Pensacola: 

Commodore : I just received information that the rebel force of 
about 10,000 concentrated at Pollard started down toward us, and 



48 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA, COAST. [Chap. XLVH. 

that a considerable force is already near Pensacola and tliis side that 
place. It is also reported that the rebels are provided with pontoons 
for crossing the Bayou Grand. 

Very respectfully, commodore, your obedient servant, 

ASBOTH, 
Brigadier- General. 



Washington, April 11, 1864 — 2.30 p. m. 

Lieutenant-General Grant, 

Culpeper, Va. : 

The Secretary of War has no information in regard to General 
Blair's case. General Hurlbut has not sufiBcient military experience 
for so important a command as the Department of the South. I will 
write to you in regard to this matter, and also in regard to Generals 
Buell and Hunter. The Thirty-sixth Ohio ordered as directed. 

H. W. HALLECK, 
Major-General, Chief of Staff. 



Washington, April 11, 1864. 

Lieutenant-General Grant, 

Culpeper, Va. : 

General : I regard our establishments at Morris Island, Hilton 
Head, and on the sea islands of immense importance. As soon as 
Gillmore leaves the rebels will probably attack one or more of these 
places. To defend them properly we want a general there of experi- 
ence and military education. My own opinion of General Hurlbut 
has been favorable, but I do not deem him equal to the command of 
the Department of the South with its diminished forces. General 
Hatch is hardly the man for the place, but probably he is the best 
that can now be spared from the field. 

I would like very much to see Buell restored to a command and 
have several times proposed him to the War Department, but there 
has been such a pressure against him from the West that I do not 
think the Secretary will give him any at present. 

I think General Hunter would not accept any command under 
McPherson, or if he did, trouble would follow. He is even worse 
than McClernand in creating difficulties. If you had him in the field 
under your immediate command perhaps things would go smoothly. 
Before acting on General Hunter's case it would be well for you to 
see his correspondence while in command of a department. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. W. HALLEGK, 
Major-General, Chief of Staff. 



Special Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department op the South, 

No. 150. j .. Hilton Head, S. C-, April 11, 1864. 

I. Colonel Hawley, Seventh Connecticut Volunteers, will proceed 
with his regiment and the Seventh New Hampshire Volunteers to 



Chap XLVII.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 49 

Hilton Head and report to Col. J. B. Howell, Eighty-fifth Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteers, commanding district. The quartermaster's de- 
partment will furnish transportation. 

f * * * * V « 

By command of Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore : 

ED. W. SMITH, 

Lieutenant- Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, April 12, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. A. Schimmelfennig, 

Comdg. Northern Dist., Dept. of the South, Folly Island, S. C. : 
General : The major-general commanding directs that you hold 
the following-named regiments and companies of your command in 
readiness to embark at short notice. All officers and men on de- 
tached duty, if within your command, will be relieved and sent at 
once to their regiments. The troops will take with them th«ir 
camp and garrison equipage and the least possible amount of bag- 
gage, viz ; Third N^ew York Volunteers, Eighty-ninth New York 
Volunteers, One hundred and seventeenth New York Volunteers, 
One hundred and forty-second New York Volunteers, Eleventh 
Maine Volunteers, Ninth Maine Volunteers, One hundredth New 
York Volunteers. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ED. W. SMITH, 
Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, April 12, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. R. Saxton, 

Comdg. U. S. Forces, Port Royal Island, S. C. : 
General : Hold the Eighth Maine, Fourth New Hampshire, and 
Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania in readiness to embark to-morrow morning 
with camp and garrison equipage. 
By order of Major-General Gillmore : 

ED. W. SMITH, 
Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjidant-General. 



Headquarters Department of the South, • 
Hilton Head, S. C, April 12, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. William Birney, 

Commanding V. S. Forces, Beaufort, S. C. : 
General : The major-general commanding directs that you hold 
the following-named regiments and companies of your command in 
readiness to embark at short notice. All officers and men on de- 
tached duty, if within your command, will be relieved and sent at 
once to their regiments. The troops will take with them their camp 

4 R R— vol XXXV, PT II 



50 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVII. 

and garrison equipage and the least possible amount of baggage, 
viz : Fourth New Hampshire Volunteers, Eighth Maine Volunteers, 
Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, Battery D, First U. S. Artil- 
lery. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

. ED. W. SMITH, 
Lieutenant- Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, April 12, 1864. 
Col. J. B. Howell, 

Corndg. Hilton Head District, Hilton Head, S. C. : 
COLONlEL : The major-general commanding directs that you hold 
the following-named regiments and companies of your command in 
readiness to embark at short notice. All officers and men on de- 
tached duty, if within your command, will be relieved and sent at 
once to their regiments. The troops will take with them their camp 
and garrison equipage and the least possible amount of baggage, 
viz : Sixth Connecticut Volunteers, Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania Vol- 
unteers, Eighty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, Thirty-ninth Illinois 
Volunteers, Sixty -second Onio Volunteers, Sixty-seventh Ohio Vol- 
unteers. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

' ED. W. SMITH, 
Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Headquarters Department of the South,. 

Hilton Head, S. C, April 12, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. J. P. Hatch, 

Commanding District of Florida, Jacksonville, Fla. : 
General : The major-general commanding directs that you hold 
the following-named regiments and companies of your command in 
readiness to embark at short notice. All officers and men on de- 
tached duty, if within your command, will be at once relieved and 
sent to their regiments. The troops will take with them their camp 
and garrison equipage and the least possible amount of baggage, 
viz : Thirteenth Indiana Volunteers, Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania 
Volunteers, Fortieth Massachusetts Mounted Infantry, Third New 
Hampshire Mounted Infantry, Twenty-fourth Massachusetts Vol- 
unteers, Tenth Connecticut Volunteers. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ED. W. SMITH, 
Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, April 13, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff of the Army, Washington, D. C. : 
General : I have to acknowledge the receipt of your dispatches 
of the 4th and 5th instant,, by the hands of Captain Smith, of your 
staff. They arrived on the 11th. Your letters of April 1 and March 
26 were also duly received. 



Chap. XLVn.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 51 

The Tenth Army Corps will commence leaving for Fortress Mon- 
roe this evening. I hope to have from 7,000 to 10,000 men there by 
the 20th. It is impossible to do better. I inclose a list of the regi- 
ments that are to remain in this department. The furloughed vet- 
erans should not be detained North. The Twenty-fifth Ohio should 
be sent here without delay. The fragment of it that did not go on 
furlough is serving with a regiment that is to remain. When the 
veterans return there will be 16,086 effective men in this depart- 
ment, which I deem sufficient for a safe defense of the positions 
we now hold on this coast. Another colored regiment and. if possi- 
ble, two of them ought to be sent here. I estimate that 5,000 men 
on Morris and Folly Islands, 5,000 in the vicinity of Port Royal 
Harbor and Fort Pulaski, and 5,000 in Florida are ample for defen- 
sive purposes, but if one or two more colored regiments can be 
spared for this command they should be sent. The principal cause 
of delay in moving the command north arises from its scattered con- 
dition and the uncertainty of crossing the bars with our steamers. 
If a northeaster should set in, it would stop our movements in con- 
centrating troops. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Q. A. GILLMORE, 
Major- General, Commanding. 



Special Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department of the South, 

No. 154. i" Hilton Head, S. C, April 13, 1864. 

I. The following-named regiments and companies will proceed 
immediately to Hilton Head and report at these headquarters. 
They will bring their camp and garrison equipage and 100 rounds 
of ammunition for the infantry (40 rounds with the men and 60 
in boxes) : One hundredth New York Volunteers, One hundred 
and forty-second New York Volunteers, Ninth Maine Volunteers, 
Eleventh Maine Volunteers, Third New York Volunteers, Eighty- 
ninth New York Volunteers, One hundred and seventeenth New 
York Volunteers, and First Connecticut Light Battery. 

II. Col. W. W. H. Davis, One hundred and fourth Pennsylvania 
Volunteers, will proceed with the following-named regiments to 
Hilton Head, without delay : One hundred and fourth Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteers, Fifty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers. 

III. The following-named regiments will proceed to Folly Island 
and report to the officer commanding the Northern District: 
Twenty-first U. S. Colored Troops, Thirty-fourth U. S. Colored 
Troops, Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Colored Volunteers, Fifty -fifth 
Massachusetts Colored Volunteers. 

IV. The following-named regiments and companies will proceed 
immediately to Hilton Head and report at these headquarters. They 
will bring their camp and garrison equipage and 100 rounds of am- 
munition for the infantry (40 rounds with the men and 60 in boxes) : 
Thirteenth Indiana Volunteers, One hundred and twelfth New York 
Volunteers, One hundred and sixty-ninth New York Volunteers, 
Ninety -seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, Tenth Connecticut Volun- 
teers, Twenty-fourth Massachusetts Volunteers, Fortieth Massa- 
chusetts Volunteers, Third New Hampshire Volunteers, Fourth 



52 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

Massachusetts Cavalry, Light Company B, First U. S. Artillery, 
Light Company M, First U. S. Artillery, Light Company E, Third 
U. S. Artillery, Light Company C, Third Ehode Island Artillery. 

V. The following-named regiments, having reported for duty in 
this department, will proceed to Beaufort, S. C, and report to the 
post commander : Twenty-sixth U. S. Colored Troops, Twenty-ninth 
Connecticut Colored Volunteers. 

* * . * * * * * 

XIV. The following-named regiments of the Tenth Army Corps 
will proceed to Fortress Monroe by the steamer Fulton, and the 
senior officer will report in person to Maj. Gen. B. F. Butler, com- 
manding Department of Virginia and North Carolina : Eighth 
Maine Volunteers, Fourth New Hampshire Volunteers. 

XV. Pending the action of the Secretary of War upon the ap- 
plication of Brig. Gen. T. Seymour to. be relieved from duty in 
this department, he will proceed to New York and there await 
action upon his application. 

******* 

By command of Mai. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore: 

ED. W. SMITH, 

Lieutenant- Colonel and Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Hilton Head, S. C, April 13, 1864. 

Brigadier-General Tuknee, 

Chief of Staff: 

General : I have the honor to request that I may be relieved from 
duty in the Department of the South, with as little delay as possible, 
and that I may be ordered to proceed to New York, to report thence 
to the General-in-Chief for further orders. 
Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

T. SEYMOUE, 

Brigadier-General. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, April 13, 1864. 

Lieut. Col. E. W. Smith, 

Asst. Adjt. Gen., Department of the SoutJi: 

Colonel : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of com- 
munication of the 12th instant, in regard to holding certain regi- 
ments of this command in readiness to embark at short notice, anji 
to report that I have issued the orders required. 

As the remaining troops of this command will be utterly insuffi- 
cient to maintain our present extended lines, I have the honor to re- 
quest instructions as early as practicable in regard to the position 
that I am to hold after the departure of these regiments. 

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, . 
Brigadier-General, Commanding District. 



Chap. XLVII.] COKKESPONDENCE, ETa TJNTOTf. 53 

Headquarteks Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, April 13, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. J. P. Hatch, 

Comdg. District of Florida, Jacksonville, Fla. : 
General : The major-general commanding directs that you send 
a force, to be taken from General Ames' original brigade, to relieve 
the garrison at Fernandina and Saint Augustine as soon as pos- 
sible. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ED. W. SMITH, 
Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Heabqxjarters District of West Florida, 

Barrancas, April 13, 1864. 
Commodore W. Smith, 

Commanding, Navy- Yard : 
Sir : Two colored boys came in this morning with the following 
information : 

They were cooks in the Fifteenth Confederate Cavalry and de- 
serted last night at 10 o'clock at the Seven-Mile Station. Colonel 
Maury is there with 160 mounted men, and said that he would take 
breakfast in the navy-yard to-morrow morning. I am sure j'ou 
will have hot pills ready for them. They are repairing and build- 
ing bridges on the several roads leading to us. Six hundred cav- 
alry and 200 to 300 infantry are at Fifteen-Mile Station. They know 
of no more troops moving down from Pollard. 
Very respectfully, your'obedient servant, 

ASBOTH, 
Brigadier- General. 



Headquarters District of West Florida, 

Barrancas, April 13, 1864. 

Commodore W. Smith, 

Commanding Namj-Yard : 

Sir : Lieutenant Breckinridge, U. S. Army, just reports the in- 
formation received. He thinks from a reliable source that there is 
a cavalry force of ten full companies 3 miles from the ||ead of the 
Bayou Grand. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ASBOTH, 
Brigadier- General. 



Special Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department op the South, 

No. 156. f Hilton Head, S. C, April 14, 1864. 

II. The following-named regiment of the Tenth Army Corps will 
proceed to Fortress Monroe, by the steamer North Star, and the 



54 S. C, FLA., A.ND ON THE OA. COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

senior officer will report in person to Maj. Gen. B. F. Butler, com- 
manding the Department of Virginia and North Carolina : Fifty- 
fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers. 

III. The following-named regiment of the Tenth Army Corps 
will proceed to Fortress Monroe, by the steamer S. R. Spaulding, 
and the senior officer will report in person to Maj. Gen. B. F. Butler, 
commanding the Department of Virginia and North Carolina : Sev- 
enth Connecticut Volunteers. 

IV. Lieut. J. S. Gibbs, First U. S. Artillery, will proceed with 
Battery D, First U. S. Artillery, to Fortress Monroe, and report in 
person to Maj. Gen. B. F. Butler, commanding the Department of 
Virginia and North Carolina. 

4; 4: :ic :(: :tc :): 4: 

By command of Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore : 

ED. W. SMITH, 
Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Hdqrs. District of Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., April 14, 1864. 
Col. Guy V. Henry, 

Commanding Light Brigade ': 

Colonel : With your command, which is to consist of the battal- 
ion Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry, Fortieth Massachusetts Mounted 
Infantry, six companies of the Third New Hampshire Mounted In- 
fantry, and a section of James' artillery, you will scout the country 
lying between the Saint John's River and the coast, from Volusia to 
opposite Jacksonville. You will establish in the vicinity of Saint 
Augustin©' a camp, at which you will keep your dismounted men 
and broken-down horses. Forage and provisions will be drawn 
from the post at Saint Augustine on requisitions and returns. Small 
parties finding it most convenient to go to Picolata for provisions 
and forage will find a supply there for issue to them. 

You will use every endeavor to assure the citizens within the dis- 
trict assigned for your duties of the protection and good will of the 
U. S. Government, and will arrest and send to Jacksonville all per- 
sons you may find endeavoring to intimidate loyal men or furnish- 
ing information to the enemy. 

Bushwhacking is so far unknown in this State, but should it be 
attempted you will punish in the most summary manner any person 
detected ift the act. Neglect no opportunity of ascertaining the 
feelings of the prominent citizens in the country toward the Gov- 
ernment. Memoranda on this subject will be made and forwarded 
to these headquarters as confidential communications. .;.' 

You will appoint a discreet person to act as provost-marshal, who 
will examine suspected persons, administer the oath of allegiance to 
loyal citizens, &c. He will keep records of his examinations and of 
the persons to whom the oath is administered, giving place of resi- 
dence, and will report from time to time to the provost-marshal of 
the district. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Chap. XLVII] CORRESPO>rDENCE, ETC. TJNIOlSr. 55 

Special Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department op the South, 

No. 160. J Hilton Head, S. C, April 15, 1864. 

v. The following-named general officers are hereby relieved from 
duty in the District of Florida, and will report in ijerson at these 
headquarters : Brig. Gen. R. S. Foster, U. S. Volunteers ; Brig. 
Gen. A. Ames, U. S. Volunteers. 

VI. Brig. Gen. William Birney is hereby relieved from duty at 
Beaufort, S. C, and will proceed to Jacksonville and report to 
Brigadier-General Hatch, commanding District of Florida. 

yil. The following-named regiment of the Tenth Army Corps 
will proceed by the steamer Arago to Fortress Monroe, and the 
senior officer will report in person to Maj. Gen. B. F. Butler, com- 
manding Department of Virginia and North Carolina: One hun- 
dredth New York Volunteers. 

VIII. The following-named regiment of the Tenth Army Corps 
will proceed by the steamers Arago and General Meigs to Fortress 
Monroe, and the commanding officer will report in person to Maj. 
Gen. B. F. Butler, commanding Department of Virginia and North 
Carolina: One hundred and forty-second New York Volunteers. 
******* 

By command of Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore : 

ED. W. SMITH, 

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Beaufort, S. C, April 15, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore, 

Commanding Department of the South : 
General : I have the honor to report that the troops recently sent 
here are perfectly raw recruits, uninstructed in any of their duties. 
In consequence the fortifications here are entirely without artillerists 
to manage the guns. I therefore request that a full company at 
least of the Third Rhode Island Jleavy Artillery may be sent here 
as soon as possible to assist in the care of the works and the manage- 
ment of the guns. I would also call your attention to the great 
necessity of my having a light battery for the defense of the island. 
I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

R. SAXTON, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 

[Indorsement.] 

Hilton Head, S. C, April 15, 1864. 
In the proposed arrangement of the troops to remain in this de- 
partment, a light battery has been assigned to the Beaufort com- 
mand. 

Q. A. GILLMORE, 

Major- General. 



Flag-Ship Nevt Ironsides, 
Off Morris Island, S. C, April 16, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore, 

Comdg. Dept. of the SoufJi, Headquarters, Hilton Head: 
General : I am in receipt of your communication of 14th of 
April, requesting that a strong naval force be kept in the Stono, and 



56 S. 0., FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVII 

suggesting that three gun-boats (steamers) would he sufficient ; also 
that the Commodore McDonough be replaced by another light- 
draught gun-boat inside Light-House Inlet. In reply I would state 
that necessary repairs to. the McDonough rendered her withdrawal 
from the inlet essential, nor can I at present detail another vessel 
for that station. I regret also to add that I have at this time no 
steamers available for the service required of them in the Stono, but 
will use my best endeavors to second your suggestion and send a 
force to that point at the earliest opportunity. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. C. ROWAN, 
Commodore, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Headquarters District of Pensacola, 

Barrancas, Fla., April 16, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. Charles P. Stone. 

Chief of Staff, Hdqrs. Dept. of the Gulf: 

General .- I have the honor to submit, in connection with my re- 
port of April 4, No. 187, the following additional information in 
regard to affairs in my neighborhood, received from refugees, de- 
serters, and my own scouts : 

There is still a force concentrated at Pollard, about 10,000 strong, 
under command of General Cantey, organizing, collecting transpor- 
tation, and preparing pontoon bridges. The troops which left Pol- 
lard in a southeasterly direction on the 8tli of March, under General 
Clanton, comprising infantry, artillery, and cavalry, and numbering 
over 2,000, are operating in Santa Rosa and Walton Counties, up to 
Choctawhatchee River, with headquarters at McDade's Pond, be- 
tween Yellow and Pea Rivers. Smaller parties, under command of 
Colonel Miller, are controlling the country between Escambia, and 
Blackwater. Rivers (Escambia County), scouting down to Gashorn's 
Point, where a schooner of ours, while collecting logs, was fired upon 
and driven back on the 10th instant. A third force is systemat- 
ically co-operating between the Escambia and Perdido Rivers, and 
have already placed 7 miles of the Pensacola Railroad from Pollard 
in running order. 

In addition to the former force at the Fifteen-Mile Station the Fif- 
teenth Confederate Cavalry, a full regiment, well mounted and well 
armed, has arrived, under Colonel Maury and Lieutenant-Colonel 
Myers. They are posted at the Seven-Mile Station (on the railroad, 
7 miles above Pensacola) and at Turner's Mill, 4 miles west of Pen- 
sacola and 5 miles north of the Bayou Grand, with an advance post 
at Jackson's Bridge, over the Bayou Chico Creek, If miles from the- 
mouth of the Bayou Grand. They are day and night repairing^ 
bridges and opening several parallel roads leading to the bayou and 
around its head to our position. Scouting parties from 75 to 100 
strong are daily approaching our lines. Five hundred additional 
infantry were expected yesterday by Colonel Maury. Beyond the 
Perdido rebel cavalry is also on the alert at Camps Withers and 
Powell. 

Thus it becomes evident that the heavy force at Pollard, the com- 
bined distribution of troops in half circle from the head of the Choc- 
tawhatchee Bay to the camps at McDade's Pond, Pollard, Fifteen- 



Chap. XLVII.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 57 

Mile Station, on the Pensacola railroad, and the mouth of Perdido, 
in connection with the activity all around, is calculated for an attack, 
not only on this place and the navy-yard, but also for a night attack 
upon Fort Pickens from the Santa Rosa Island. 

I have made arrangements with the navy for proper co-operation, 
agreeing upon signals as given in inclosed Special Orders, Nos. 81 
and 8a, and hold my small command ready by day and night for any 
emergency, continually strengthening my position. But my hand- 
ful of men is entirely inadequate to secure a long resistance to a ten- 
fold superior force. 

During the last three months I made several applications for re- 
enforcements and steamers with the view of advancing into the 
interior of West Florida and destroying the Mobile and Montgomery 
Railroad ; now I am compelled to request, most respectfully and 
urgently, to be re-enf orced!^ with two regiments of infantry and one 
regiment of cavalry, to meet successfully the impending attack and 
prevent a calamity which would, especially at the present juncture, 
prove a hard blow for us and an immense success for the rebels. 

Commodore W. Smith has already removed the hospital from the 
navy-yard to the boats. I will remove nothing, but limit my prepa- 
rations to a vigorous defense. 

I am, very respectfully, general, your obedient servant, 

ASBOTH, 
Brigadier-General. 



Special Orders, | Hdqrs. Department of the South, 

No. 163. \ Hilton Head, S. C, April 16, 1864. 

:^ :{: :H ;t « * 4: 

II. Brig. Gen. I. Vogdes, U. S. Volunteers, is hereby ordered to 
assume command on board the U. S. transport Arago and proceed 
with her to Fortress Monroe. 

He will report to Maj. Gen. B. F. Butler, commanding the De- 
partment of Virginia and North Carolina, for the purpose of organ- 
izing the troops belonging to the Tenth Army Corps, as they arrive, 
in accordance with instructions received from these headqiiarters. 

By command of Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore : 

ED. W. SMITH, 
Lieutenant- Colonel and Assistant Adjutant- General. 



CULPEPER, April 17, 18G4— 6 p. m. 

(Received 7.40 p. m.) 

Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Washington, D. C. : 

Send detachments belonging to regiments to remain in the De- 
partment of the South back to their regiments. All other troops 
belonging to Gillmore's forces send to him as soon as notice is re- 
ceived of his arrival at Fort Monroe. 

U. S. GRANT, 

Lieutenant- General. 



58 g. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. (Chap. XLVII. 

Flag-Ship New Ironsides, 
Off Morris Island, S. C, April 17, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmoee, U. S. Army, 

Comdg. Department of the South, Hilton Head, S. C. : 
General : I am in receipt of a commimication from Brig. Gen. 
R. Saxton, addressed to you, with indorsement by yourself asking 
for the detail "of a small gun-boat to be stationed at or near Beau- 
fort, with orders to cruise in these (those) waters." I regret to say 
that I have few vessels suitable for such duty, in good repair, but 
will instruct the commanding of&cer at Port Royal to avail himself 
of the first that may be completed that can be spared for that service. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. C. ROWAN, 
Commodore, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Special Orders, \ Hdqrs. Department of the South, 

No. 163. j Hilton Head, S. C, April 17, 1864. 

I. The following-named regiments of the Tenth Ariny Corps will 
proceed by the steamer Northern Light to Fortress Monroe, and the 
senior officer will report in person to Maj. Gen. B. F. Butler, com- 
manding Department of Virginia and North Carolina: Seventh New 
Hampshire Volunteers, Forty -seventh New York Volunteers, and 
One hundred and fifteenth New York Volunteers. 

II. The following-named regiment of the Tenth Army Corps will 
proceed by the steamer Ranger to Fortress Monroe, and the com- 
manding officer will report in person to Maj. Gen. B. F. Butler, 
commanding Department of Virginia and North Carolina : Eighty- 
ninth New York Volunteers. 

III. Brig. Gen. A. H. Terry, U. S. Volunteers, is hereby relieved 
from command of the Northern District and will proceed to Fortress 
Monroe and report to Maj. Gen. B. F. Butler, commanding the De- 
partment of Virginia and North Carolina, for the purpose of organ- 
izing the troops belonging to the Tenth Army Corps. He will as- 
certain the wants of the troops and make such requisitions as may 
be necessary to supply them. 

By .command of Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore : 

ED. W. SMITH, 
Lieutenant- Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, April 17, 1864. - 
Brig. Gen, J. P. Hatch, 

Comdg. District of Florida, Jacksonville, Fla. : 
General : In reply to your letter of the 14th instant, asking 
authority to assure the people of Florida that they will not be 
deserted by the Union forces, and that a sufficient force will be 
retained there to hold all the country we may occupy, I am in- 
structed by the major-general commanding to say that it has never 
been his intention to evacuate the position now held hj our troops. 
The withdrawal from Palatka was indispensable in order to effect 
the combinations necessary in moving troops according to instruc- 



Chap. XLVn.] CORRESPOITOENCE, ETC. UNION. 59 

tions from the War Department. As the prospective commandei* 
of the department, he suggests that you can give such assurances as 
you may deem proper. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ED. W. SMITH, 
lAeutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Special Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department op the South. 

Fo. 165. j Hilton Head, S. C, April 18, 1864-. 

III. The detachments of the following-named regiments of the 
Tenth Army Corps will proceed to Fortress Monroe, and the senior 
officer will report in person to Maj. Gen. B. F. Butler, commanding 
Department of Virginia and North Carolina : Thirty-ninth Illinois 
Volunteers, Sixty-second Ohio Volunteers, Sixty-seventh Ohio Vol- 
unteers. 

IV. The headquarters of the Third Rhode Island Artillery are 
hereby ordered to be established at Hilton Head. 

V. Col. W. W. H. Davis, One hundred and fourth Pennsylvania 
Volunteers, is hereby relieved from duty in the Northern District 
and will proceed to Hilton Head and relieve Col. J. B. Howell, 
Eighty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, in command of Hilton Head, 
Fort Pulaski, Saint Helena, and Tybee Island. 

VI. Capt. S. C. Day, Third New York Light Artillery, will pro- 
ceed immediately with his battery to Beaufort, S. C, and report to 
Brigadier-General Saxton, commanding post. 

The quartermaster's department will furnish transportation. 
By command of Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore : 

ED. W. SMITH, 
Lieutenant- Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, April 18, 1864. 
Lieut. Col. E. W. Smith, A. A. G., Dept. of the South: 
' Colonel: The various forts, magazines, &c., in this district 
which are constantly requiring repairs render it imperatively neces- 
sary that a company of engineers should be stationed within the 
command. I would respectfully, therefore, make application for the 
same, and should be much gratified if Captain Suess, New York 
Engineers, now here, could be allowed to remain or return, as he is 
thoroughly acquainted with the ground and the duties required of 
him. 
I have the honor to be, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 
■' Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. Northern District. Dept. op the South, 

Folly island, S. C, April 18, 1864. 
Col. W. W. H. Davis, 

Comdg. U. S. Forces, Morris Island, S. C. : 
Sir : The Fifty-fourth Massachusetts (colored) Volunteers arrived 
this a. m. and has been ordered to report to you. General Schim- 



60 S, C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLATI. 

melfennig directs tliat yoii send tlie Ninth Maine and as many com- 
panies of the Eleventh Maine Volunteers as may be required to make 
900 men, by the steamer Cosmopolitan, to Hilton Head as soon as 
practicable. Special Orders, No. 154, headquarters Department of 
the South, is herewith transmitted.* 

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. B. DEAN, 
Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, April 18, 1864. 
Col. W. W. H. Davis, 

Comdg. U. S. Forces, Morris Island, S. C. : 
Colonel : The Cosmopolitan will carry about 900 men. Send the 
Ninth and Eleventh Maine Volunteers, if together they do not ex- 
ceed that niimber. Get a steamer at Light- House Inlet of Captain 
Burns to take the baggage to Pawnee Landing. The Fifty -fourth 
Massachusetts landed at Pawnee this noon and have probably 
reported to you by this time. 

By order of Brigadier-General Schimmelfennig : 

W. B, DEAN, 
Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters Northern District, 

Folly Island, S. C, April 18, 1864. 
Lieut. Col. E. W. Smith, 

Assistant Adjutant-General, Dept. of the South: 

Colonel : I have the honor to report the following arrivals and 
departures of troops from this command : 

Arrived this day, the Fifty-fourth and five companies of the Fifty- 
fifth Massachusetts Volunteers (colored). Departed, April 14, the 
One hundredth and One hundred and forty-second Regiments New 
York Volunteers for Hilton Head. Ajjril 16, the Eighty-ninth New 
York Volunteers for Hilton Head. The First Connecticut Light 
Battery has embarked and is about to sail direct for Fortress Mon- 
roe ; verbal instrivetions were given to Captain Rockwell by Gen- 
eral Terry before lie left here. Ready to leave are the Ninth and 
Eleventh Regiments Maine Volunteers, on the Cosmopolitan, and 
the Third Regiment New York Volunteers about to embark on the 
steamer Neptune. 

I have the honor to be, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 

Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Northern District, 

Folly Island, S. C., April 18, 1864. 
Lieut. Col. E. W. Smith, 

Assistant Adjutant-General, Dept. of the South: 
Colonel : I have the honor to report that I have tried Hale's war 
rockets in regard to their correctness of flight, power of penetra- 

* See pTsL 



Chap. XlVii.) CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 61 

tiou, and the best methods of handling and discharging them. I 
have tried them against targets and against the enemy and have 
found them, very serviceable. I have armed all the outer forts in 
which I did not wish to expose artillery with these rockets. I have 
organized a common rocket battery (the men are instructed and 
drilled), and am now organizing a boat rocket battery to accompany 
expeditious, &c. I regret to say that there are but 700 rockets on 
hand, and that they are of the large size (3i-inch, nearly 32 pounds 
weight), which are less serviceable than the smaller ones. I beg that 
the major-general commanding will instruct his ordnance officer to 
obtain without delay for this district : 

First. Three thousand 2i-iuch Hale's rockets, old construction, 
with rotation holes in the rear end and a 4-second fuse. With these 
I require no stands. 

Second. One thousand S^-inch rockets, with 10 stands. 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding District. 



Headquarters Department of the South. 

Hilton Head, S. C, April 19, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff of the Army, Washington, D. C. : 
General : In taking the field with the Tenth Army Corps, I have 
deemed it proper to assign Brig. Gen. J. W. Turner, my chief of 
staff and of artillery, to the command of troops, presuming that 
there might be objections raised to my keeping an officer of that 
rank on my staff. 

I prefer assigning my chief commissary, Lieut. Col. M. R. Mor- 
gan, to the position of chief of staff in addition to his other duties. 
Colonel Morgan, however, fears that the Commissary-General will 
object to this arrangement and will prefer that he occupy the posi- 
tion of chief commissary of some geographical department. His 
rank as commissary would make him chief commissary in General 
Butler's department,' but Colonel Morgan prefers to remain on duty 
with the Tenth Corps in the double position that I have indicated 
above. What I desire is that instructions may be given to the Com- 
missary-General to allow Colonel Morgan to remain on duty with 
his corps unless Major-General Butler prefers some other arrange- 
ment. I await a reply to this communication before I make the as- 
signment. 

Q. A. GILLMORE, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Special Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department of the South, 

No. 1G9. j Hilton Head, S. C, April 19, 1864. 

I. The following-named regiment of the Tenth Army Corps will 
proceed by the steamer Victor to Fortress Monroe, and the senior 
officer will I'eport in person to Maj. Gen. B. F. Butler, commanding 
Department of Virginia and North Carolina : Thirteenth Indiana 
Volunteers. 

«ffe ^ S|? ^ ^ 'I* ^ 

By command of Maj. Gen. Q.. A. Gilimore ; 

ED. w. smith; 

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant- General. 



62 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVU. 

Washington, D. C, April 20, 1864—12.05 a. m. 
Brig. Gen. T. Seymour, 

New York: 
You will report to General Dix for temporary duty, inspecting 
and forwarding troops to the field. 

H. W. HALLECK, 
Major-General, Chief of Staff. 



Special, Orders, | Hdqrs. Department op the South, 

No. 171. 5 Hilton Head, S. C, April 20, 1864. 

I. The following-named regiments of the Tenth Army Corps will 
proceed to Fortress Monroe, and the senior officer will report in per- 
son to Maj. Gen. B. F. Butler, commanding Department of Virgmia 
and North Carolina : Third New York volunteers. Forty-eighth 
New York Volunteers, Ninth Maine Volunteers, Eleventh Maine 
Volunteers. 

II. The following-named regiments of the Tenth Army Corps will 
proceed to Fortress Monroe, and the senior officer will report in per- 
son to Maj. Gen. B. F. Butler, commanding Department of Virginia 
and North Carolina : Tenth Connecticut Volunteers, One hundred 
and seventeenth New York Volunteers. 

IV. Col. S. M. Alford, Third New York Volunteers, will proceed 
by the steamer Ben De Ford to Fortress Monroe and report to Maj. 
Gen. B. F. Butler, commanding Department of Virginia and North 
Carolina, for the purpose of organizing, under direction of Brigadier- 
General Terry, U. S. Volunteers, the Second Division of the Tenth 
Army Corps as it arrives. 

By command of Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore : 

ED. W. SMITH, 

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant General. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folhj Island, S. C, April 20, 1864. 
Col. W. W. H. Davis, 

Commanding U. S. Forces, Morris Island, S. C. : 
Sir : I am instructed by General Schimmelfennig to transmit Spe- 
cial Orders, No. 165, headquarters Department of the South, reliev- 
ing you from duty in this district, &c.* The general commanding 
directs that you turn over the command to Colonel Hallowell, Fifty-; 
fourth Massachusetts Volunteers, as the Fifty-second and One hun-^ 
dred and fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers will leave for Hilton Head 
as soon as transportation for them arrives. At present there is but 
one steamer here (the Sentinel), and that is now loading Battery F, 
Third New York Artillery, at Pawnee Landing. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. B. DEAN, 
^ Lieut, and Acting Assistant Adjutant- General. 

*Seep. 58. 



Chap. XLVU.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 63 

General Orders, | Headquarters U. S. Forces, 

No. 39. ) Morris Island, S. C, April 20, 1864. 

The undersigned having been relieved from duty in the Northern 
District by virtue of Special Orders, No. 165, headquarters Depart- 
ment of the South, and ordered to report at Hilton Head, S. C., to 
assume command of the District of Hilton Head, Pulaski, Saint 
Helena, and Tybee Island, hereby turns over the command of the 
post of Morris Island to Col. E. N. Hallowell, Fifty-fourth Massa- 
chusetts Volunteers. 

The following-named commissioned oflScer and enlisted men are 
hereby relieved from duty at this post, aud will accompany the un- 
dersigned to Hilton Head, S. C. : Maj. Edward L. Rogers, One hun- 
dred and fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers, acting assistant adjutant- 
general ; Henry J. Redfield, clerk, headquarters Second Brigade, 
Eighty-first New York Volunteers ; Charles B. Johnson, Company 
D, One hundred and fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers; Chapman 
Carver, Company B, One hundred and fourth Pennsylvania Volun- 
teers; Miles J. Eastman, Company B, Fifty-second Pennsylvania 
Volunteers. 

W. W. H. DAVIS, 
Colonel lOith Pennsylvania Vols., Comdg. Post. 



Special Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department of the South, 

No. 175. j Hilton Head, S. C, April 22, 1864. 

I. The following-named regiments of the Tenth Army Corps will 
proceed to Fortress Monroe, and the senior officer will report in 
person to Maj. Gen. B. F. Butler, commanding the Department of 
Virginia and North Carolina : Eighty-fifth Pennsylvania Volun- 
teers, One hundred and twelfth New York Volunteers, One hun- 
dred and sixty-ninth New York Volunteers. The quartermaster's 
department will furnish transportation. 

III. Brig. Gen. A. Ames, U. S. Volunteers, will assume command 
of the troops on board the transport Pulton, and proceed to Fortress 
Monroe and report to Maj. Gen. B. F. Butler, commanding Depart- 
ment of Virginia and North Carolina. 

IV. Brig. Gen. J. W. Turner, chief of staff, will proceed by the 
"Fulton to Fortress Monroe and report to Maj. Gen. B. F. Butler, 
commanding Department of Virginia and North Carolina, for the 
purpose of taking necessary measures for the organization of the 
Tenth Army Corps. 

By command of Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore : 

W. L. M. BURGER, 

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters District of West Florida, 

Barrancas, April 22, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. Charles P. Stone, 

Chief of Staff, Hdqrs. Department of the Gulf: 
^ General : I have the honor to submit, in connection with my 
report of April 16, No. 213, the following additional information 



64 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. (Chap. XLVII. 

relative to affairs in my neighborhood, received from refugees and 
deserters : 

The larger portion of the troops that were stationed at Pollard 
started suddenly on railroad for Dalton, leaving only 3,000 at Pol- 
lard. There are 700 infantry and 300 cavalry at Milton and 700 
cavalry at Canoe Station, oii the Mobile Railroad, 16 miles from 
Pollard, guarding the railroad. The fortifications at the terminus 
of the Mobile and Montgomery Railroad at the Tensaw River are of 
very little strength. 

The iron ram Tennessee is not yet over the bar, but ready to run 
the blockade, and considered a perfect success. There are several 
other smaller rams and a few wooden gun-boats at Mobile. The 
fortifications around the city are completed. The garrison at Mo- 
bile is not over 3,000 besides the militia. 

Relative to the strength of the enemy from Pollard down to 
Pensacola I have not been able to get any additional information. 
The work on the railroad was discontinued, but the telegraph is 
in operation to Cooper Station, 20 miles above Pensacola. Approach- 
ing rebel parties were repeatedly fired upon by our pickets and 
twice shelled by the navy guard-ships off the mouth of the Bayou 
Grand. I expect this evening the return of one of my scouts with 
minute information. 

Very few recruits can reach our lines at present, as all West Flor- 
ida is swarming with rebel cavalry hunting refugees and deserters. 
In Walton County 7 citizens were hung last week for entertaining 
Union sentiments, and a woman, refusing to give information about 
her husband's whereabouts, was killed in a shocking manner, and 
two of her children caught and torn to pieces by bloodhounds. 

A small steamer, long since applied for, would enable me to ascend 
to Washington Point, Washington County, at the head of Choctaw- 
hatchee Bay, and mouth of the Choctawhatchee River, and collect 
many of those unfortunate victims of the rebellion. 

At East Pass I have to provide for 200 refugees, women and 
children, who arrived there in a most destitute condition. Here I 
have sheltered with condemned tents 609 destitute women and chil- 
dren, a majority of them suffering more or less from various dis- 
eases in consequence of their privations and hardships. 

I am, very respectfully, general, your obedient servant, 

ASBOTH, 
Bi'igadier- General. 



CULPEPEE, Va., April 23, 1864—5 p. m. 

(Received 8.30 p. m.) 
Major-General Halleck, 

Chief of Staff: 
Confidential letters of Admiral Dahlgren and Secretary of the 
Navy just received.* With the reduced state of the command at 
Charleston, I do not know what can be done in the direction recom- 
mended by the admiral ; but I will send the letters by special mes- 
senger to General Gillmore, at Fort Monroe, and ascertain from him 
the exact situation and give directions accordingly. 

' U. S. GRANT, 

Lieutenant-Oeneral. 

*Seep. 67. 



Chap. XLVII.) CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 65 

Hdqrs. District of Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., April 23, 1864. 
Col. A. L. Harris, 

Commanding Seventy-fifth Ohio Volunteers : 

Colonel : The commanding general directs that you will leave a 
sufficient number of men in camp for a guard, and proceed with the 
remainder on marches of 25 miles a day, by way of Saint Augustine, 
to the town of Volusia, on the Saint John's River. You are not to 
show yourself to people on the other side of the river ; to picket all 
the fords and ferries in such a way as to prevent people passing 
from the east to the west side, allowing all persons to pass from the 
west to the east side, but not to go back. You will also place 
guards on the main roads running southward between Saint John's 
River and the ocean, the object being to prevent all passing from 
the east to the west side, so long as you are operating there. You 
will conceal your men as much as possible from persons on the west 
side. In passing southward you will make particular inquiries as 
to the probable supply of cattle from that region of the country. 
Your guard at Volusia will keep watch for the boat which will 
probably reach there, from Jacksonville, some time on Thursday. 
When the boat comes in sight you will call in all your pickets, and 
have your whole force as promptly as possible at Volusia Ferry. 
Your men will start with three days' cooked rations in haversacks, 
and with ten days' rations of hard bread, sugar, and coffee in knap- 
sacks. Each officer and man will take one blanket or overcoat. All 
other clothing will be left under guard at camp or stored. Three 
4-horse teams may be taken, loaded with oats. No hay will be 
taken. 

The object of the general commanding is to protect and conciliate 
the people on the east side of the river ; their property will be pro- 
tected, and any man caught pillaging from a loyal citizen may be 
shot on the spot. Parties engaged as spies in the rebel cause, or in 
catching rebel deserters, will be summarily punished. You will be 
careful to arrive at Volusia on or before noon on Thursday. In 
case the boat does not arrive before Sunday morning, you will use 
your command in driving cattle to Jacksonville. 

I have the honor to be, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

R. M. HALL, 
First Lieut., First U. S. Artillery, A. A. A. G. 



Hdqrs. District of Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., April 23, 1864. 
Col. William H. Noble, 

Commanding Post, Saint Augustine : 
Colonel : The commanding general directs that on the receipt of 
this you will select a competent officer and a sufficient number of men 
from your command to guard Fort Marion ; one or two companies 
will probably be sufficient. With the rest you will march so as to 
arrive at Volusia at noon next Thursday. 

Your men will be provided with three days' cooked rations, and 
twelve days' rations of hard bread, sugar, and coffee in knapsacks. 
Neither overcoat nor blanket will be allowed, and each man will have 

5 R R — vol XXXV, PT II 



66 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVU. 

40 rounds of ball cartridges. You will see that all the men who 
march wear the Government bootees. You will receive further orders 
at Volusia by a boat which will probably arrive there on Thursday. 
Should the boat not arrive before Sunday morning you will use 
your command for the purpose of driving to Saint Augustine as 
many cattle as are needed for your command at that place, turning 
them over to the subsistence department. 

I have the honor to be, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

E. M. HALL, 
First Lieut., First U. S. Artillery, A. A. A. O. 



Hdqrs. District of Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., April 23, 1864. 
Captain Bailey, 

Comdg. Eighth U. S. Colored Troops, Yellow Bluff, Fla. : 

Captain : You will confer immediately with Captain Lewis, of the 
gun-boat Mahaska, for the purpose of making a reconnaissance in 
force of the country between Daniel and Trout Creeks. 

You will find, if possible, such guides as are acquainted with 
the country, and push your reconnaissance, if possible, as far from 
railroad from Fernandina, touching it at the nearest or most conve- 
nient point for the purpose of destroying a small portion of it. This 
may be done by building a large fire of pine logs, and laying the 
iron rails across the fire. It is not, however, considered important 
to reach the railroad ; the main object of the reconnaissance is to 
get to the rear of rebel scouts between Trout and Daniel Creeks. 
You will return to the river, sweeping, as well as you can, the 
country lying between the two creeks, taking care not to allow your 
command to be separated by Cedar Creek. You will arrange with 
Captain Lewis the point at which you shall disembark for the re- 
connaissance, and a point at which you shall embark after having 
made it. 

Captain Lewis kindly promises to furnish four boats and the oars- 
men, enough to furnish transportation for 60 men. You can use the 
oar-boats in your possession for the transportation of the rest of the 
party. 

By order of Brig. Gen. William Birney : 

P. F. YOUNG, 
Captain and Acting Aide-de-Camp. 



Special Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department op the South, 

No. 178. J Hilton Head, S. C, April 23, 1864:. 

I. Brig. Gen. R. S. Foster, U. S. Volunteers, will assume com- 
mand of the troops on board the transport Ericsson and proceed to 
Fortress Monroe and report to Maj. Gen. B. F. Butler, commanding 
the Department of Virginia and North Carolina. 

******* 

By command of Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore : 

ED. W. SMITH, 
Lieutenant- Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Chap. XLVn.] COERESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 67 

Headquarters Armies in the Field, 

Culpeper Couri-House, Va., April 2i, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore, 

Commanding Departyneut of the South : 

General : Herewith I send you copy of letter from Admiral 
Dahlgren to tlie Secretary of the Navy, and from the latter to the 
military authorities, recommending certain movements near Charles- 
ton, S. C. The letters explain themselves. Please read them and 
send me your views on the proposed movements. Not knowing the 
situation of affairs about Charleston, and particularly since the 
withdrawal of so many of your forces, I can give no specific direc- 
tions. I would state, however, that it will be of great advantage 
to us if 'the force at Charleston can be safely employed in keeping' 
up a demonstration that will force the enemy to keep large numbers 
there to watch their movements. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

U. S. GRANT, 
Lieutenant- General. 

[Inclosure.] 

Navy Department, 

April 21, 1864. 
[Edwin M. Stanton, 

Secretary of War:] 

Sir : I have the honor to inclose herewith a copy of a letter ad- 
dressed to this Department by Rear- Admiral Dahlgren. As the 
hurricanes of July and August are likely to place in great peril the 
vessels lying off Morris Island, entirely unsheltered as that anchor- 
age is, I invite your earnest attention to this project, as its success 
will afford an interior position beyond the reach of disaster by storm 
or the enemy. Morris Island, at present occupied by our troops, has 
been 4 feet under water in a hurricane. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GIDEON WELLES, 
Secretary of the Navy. 

[Indorsement.] 

April 32, 1864. 
Respectfully forwarded to Lieutenant-General Grant. 

H. W. HALLECK, 
Major- General, Chief of Staff. 

[Sub-inclosure.] 

Washington, April 31, 1864, 
Hon. G. Welles. 

Secretary of the Navy : 
Sir : As the demands of th* public service elsewhere will prevent 
the detail of more iron-ciads for service at Charleston, which will 
necessarily postpone any serious attack on the interior defenses of 
the harbor, I would suggest that combined operations be directed to 
the occupation of Long Island, with the view of an attack on the 
works of Sullivan's Island, to be prosecuted as far as the force 



68 8. C, FLA., AWD ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVH. 

ashore and afloat may permit. If Sullivan's Island can be occupied, 
it would enable the iron-clads to maintain position in the harbor 
permanently, and in the end to drive the rebels from Charleston. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfuUv, your obedient servant, 

JNO. A, DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Washington, D. C, April 34, 1864. 
Lieutenant-General Grant, Culpeper: 

General : If the iron-clads and the large number of troops off 
Charleston for the last year could not take and hold Sullivan's 
Island, how can they expect to do it with forces diminished more 
than one-half ? Moreover, if taken, it would simply result in the 
loss from active service of 5,000 troops to garrison it, without any 
influence upon the coming campaign. It will require 60,000 men 
three months to take Chaileston. The capture of Sullivan's Island 
would not have much influence upon the siege of that place, as it 
can be conducted with greater advantage from other points. I am 
satisfied that Admiral Dahlgren's letter was intended simply as an 
excuse in advance for the inability of the iron-clads to accomplish 
anything against Charleston. 
Yours, tnily, 

H. W. HALLECK, 

General-in- Chief. 

Special Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department op the South, 

No. 180. J Hilton Head, S. C, April 24, 1864. 

* * * * * * * 

II. The following-named regiments and companies belonging to 
the Tenth Army Corps are hereby ordered to proceed to Fortress 
Monroe and report to Maj. Gen. B. F. Butler, conmianding Depart- 
ment of Virginia and North Carolina : Sixth Connecticut Volun- 
teers, Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers, Ninety -seventh Penn- 
sylvania Volunteers, Third New Hampshire Volunteers, Twenty- 
fourth Massachusetts Volunteers, Fortieth Massachusetts Volun- 
teers, First Battalion Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry, Light Com- 
pany E, Third U. S. Artillery ; Battery B, First U. S. Artillery ; 
Battery M, First U. S. Aj-tillery ; Light Company C, Third Rhodif 
Island Artillery ; First New York Volunteer Engineers, except Com 
pany C. The quartermaster's department will furnish transporta 
tion. 

* * * * * ^f * 

By command of Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore : 

ED. W. SMITH, 

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. op the South, ' 

Folhj Island, S. C, April 25, 1864. 
Lieut. Col. E. W. Smith, 

Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of the South : 
Colonel : I have the honor to call j-our attention to the fact that 
some of the colored regiments recently arrived in this district 



ObjlP. XLVIl.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — tJNIOW. 69 

(among them the Fifty-fifth Massachusetts) have not been paid for 
more than a year. The men and their families are suffering and 
greatly in need of the pay which is due them. As a consequence, 
the greatest discontent prevails, and in several instances a spirit of 
mutiny has been developed. 

Deeming the circumstances of the case sufficiently grave, I have 
ordered Colonel Hartwell, commanding Fifty-fifth Massachusetts 
Regiment, to proceed to Hilton Head and there to lay the whole 
matter before the general commanding the department. I trust that 
his representation of facts may meet with attention and some meas- 
ures be taken to remedy the difficulty. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 
Brigadier-Oeneral, Commanding District. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, April 25, 1864. 
Lieut. Col. E. W. Smith, 

Assistant Adjutant-General, Dept. of the South : 

Sir : I have the honor to report that all the troops ordered away 
from my command have left with the exception of a part of the 
Fifty-second Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers and ten teams, 
which will be forwarded as soon as transportation can be obtained. 
This district is at present divided into three parts, garrisoned as fol- 
lows, viz : 

Folly Island, commanded by Col. L. von Gilsa, Forty-first New 
York Volunteers, and comprising the Forty-first and Fifty-fourth 
New York Volunteers and the Seventy -fourth Pennsylvania Volun- 
teers. Little Folly Island, commanded by Col. William Heine, One 
hundred and third New York Volunteers, comprising the One hun- 
dred and third New York Volunteers and the Fifty-fifth Massachu- 
setts (colored). 

Morris Island, commanded by Col. William Gurney, One hun- 
dred and twenty-seventh New York Volunteers, comprising the One 
hundred and twenty-seventh New York Volunteers, Fifty-fourth 
Massachusetts (colored). Twenty-first and Thirty-fourth United 
States (colored), five companies of the Third Rhode Island Heavy 
Artillery, and two sections of Light Battery B, Third New York 
Artillery. 

I have given orders for the forts on Kiawah and Long Islands to 
be disarmed, and for the oyster-shell fort on Cole's Island to be thor- 
oughly repaired and armed. 

I have deemed it wise, while this movement of troops was going 
on, to show to the enemy as bold a front and harass him as much as 
possible, and deserters inform me that it has had the effect of de- 
taining in Charleston five battalions that were going north, and that 
they have been in nightly expectation of an attack on James Island. 

On Morris Island I have forbidden the firing at small fatigue par- 
ties, and only allow a few shots to be fired into Charleston during 
each twenty-four hours into different parts of the city, to render 
their movement of troops insecure. 

During the last week I have had 3 men (One hundred and twenty- 
seventh New York Volunteers) wounded by the explosion of a tor- 
Eedo on Battery Island, and 1 man (Fifty-fourth Massachusetts) 
illed while on picket on Morris Island by the enemy's shells. 



70 8. C, FLA., AND ON THE OA. COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

Of the movements and dispositions of the enemy, I have reported 
in another letter.* 

I would respectfully beg to be definitely informed whether I am 
to receive more troops here, and, if so, in what number. If not, I 
shall be obliged to make a different disposition of my forces, hold- 
ing only the main points and chief lines of communication, such as 
Morris Island, Light-House Inlet, the south end of Folly Island, and 
Stono Inlet, abandoning the middle of Folly Island and Pawnee 
Landing, and holding Long Island only as a post of observation. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 
Brigadier-Oeneral, Commanding District. 



Hdqrs. Nokthern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, April 25, 1864. 

Lieut. Col. E. W. Smith, 

Assistant Adjutant-General, Dept. of the South : 
Sir : As has already been represented by me in other letters ad- 
dressed to you this day, I consider it my duty to keep the enemy on 
my front as actively engaged as possible. I shall continue to do so 
in the hope of retaining a superior force before me as at present dur- 
ing the decision of the campaign in Virginia. To meet the enemy 
to advantage, with my reduced and inferior numbers, requires two 
conditions fulfilled : First, the power to concentrate a heavy artil- 
lery fire at any point without regard to ground and risk ; second, 
superior facilities of transportation. As regards the first condition 
I have but four pieces of light artillery. To make up for this defi- 
ciency, I have made application for a supply of war rockets to be 
obtained, and would like to be informed whether the requisition for 
the same has been forwarded approved. In the matter of transpor- 
tation, I regret to state that the only seaworthy boat capable of be- 
ing used as a dispatch-boat, the Nellie Baker, was obliged to remain 
at Hilton Head last time she went down for repairs, and of the four 
boats used as ferries and for internal transportation the Philadel- 
phia and Frazier are so out of repair as to be entirely unservicea- 
ble. In view of these facts, I would request that a serviceable dis- 
patch-boat be ordered to report to me without delay. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding District. 



Hdqrs. District of Florida, Dept. op the South, 

Jacksonville, Ma., April 2G, 18G4. 

Lieut. Col. E. W. Smith, 

Assistant Adjutant- General : 

Sir : A refugee from the east side of the Saint John's, opposite 

Fort Gates, reports that a rebel cavalry force of 400 has been at 

Fort Gates since about Friday last ; that they had raised one lighter 

and were repairing another, for the purpose of effecting a crossing 

*See p. 12. 



Chap. XLVn.) CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 71 

and making a raid toward Saint Augustine for the purpose of driv- 
ing off all the horses and cattle on the east side and arresting all 
the Union men. It was said the Union men had taken to the woods, 
but that 17 were caught and hung on the spot. My informant was 
one of 13 refugees that got safely into Saint Augustine. 

My measures are taken to meet this cavalry force. I go up the 
river to-night with 450 men of Colonel Beecher's regiment. Colonel 
Harris, with 220 mounted infantry, and Colonel Noble, with about 
250 infantry, will meet the rebels at the head of Dunn's Lake. 

In obedience to orders, or rather suggestions, of General Hatch, 
I had sent Colonel Harris to patrol that part of the country. He 
left Saint Augustine this morning. Colonel Noble left yesterday 
morning. 

Very truly, your obedient servant. 

WM. BIRNEY, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 

P. S. — I shall myself go to the point threatened, leaving Colonel 
Tilghman in command of this post, which is quite secure, with its 
fortifications and the gun-boats. 

WM. BIRNEY. 



Special Orders, | Hdqrs. DepaRiTment of the South, 

No. 184. j Hilton Head, S. C, April 2C, 1864. 

I. Col. W. W. H. Davis, One hxmdred and fourth Pennsylvania 
"Volunteers, is hereby ordered to relieve Col. J. B. Howell, Eighty- 
fifth Pennsylvania volunteers, in command of Hilton Head, Fort 
Pulaski, Tybee, and Saint Helena Islands. Colonel Howell, upon 
being relieved, will proceed to Fortress Monroe and report to Maj. 
Gen. B. F. Butler, commanding the Department of Virginia and 
North Carolina, for the purpose of rejoining his command with the 
Tenth Army Corps. 

By command of Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore : 

ED. W. SMITH, 

Lieutentant- Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, April 27, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C. : 

General : I have the honor to transmit herewith a copy of a 
report received from Brigadier-General Schimmelfennig, command- 
ing the Northern District of this department, relative to the move- 
ments of the enemy in his front. Confirming reports have been 
T'eceived from other sources. 
I have the honor to be, very rgppectfuUy, your obedient servant, 

Q. A. GILLMORE, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



72 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVU. 

[Inclosure.] 

Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. op the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, April 25, 1864, 
Brig. Gen. J. W. Turner, 

Chief of Staff, Hdqrs. Department of the South : 

General, : I have the honor to report the following information, 
obtained from deserters who have recently come on board the fleet, 
of the movements of the enemy and changes of their force upon 
my front. It is partly confirmed by the reports of reconnoitering 
parties sent out by me on James and John's Islands. 

General Beauregard and staff, having returned from Florida, left 
Charleston for Virginia last .week. Troops are constantly passing 
through Charleston from Florida and Columbia to the north. On 
John's Island and the mainland in its neighborhood, the force, in- 
stead of being as formerly (four regiments of infantry — Wise's bri- 
gade — and one regiment of cavalry), now consists of two regiments of 
infantry, one near Church Flats and one at Adams' Run ; five compa- 
nies of cavalry and one light battery. Two regiments of Wise's bri- 
gade are on their way north from Florida, and the remaining two are 
daily expecting orders to leave. The enemy have lately completed 
a new work on the mainland, to cover the ferry from John's Island 
and east of Rantowles Station. It mounts six guns and is garrisoned 
by one company of heavy artillery. A bridge across the Stono 
River, from John's Island to James, skirting the latter between Bat- 
teries Pringle and Tynes, is being built. It is a heavy bridge and 
the work progresses slowly. It is beyond the range of our guns. 

On James Island there are now but two regiments of infantry, the 
Twenty-fifth and Twenty-seventh South Carolina. The artillery 
force remaining unchanged (one regiment of five or six companies), 
but the cavalry (four companies Fifth South Carolina) and the Siege 
Train have gone to Virginia. Earth-works are being thrown up 
south of Foi't Johnson on the beach. In the city of Charleston 
there is but one regiment of infantry and five or six companies of 
artillery, besides which the cadets do duty. At Fort Ripley the 
garrison is, as formerly, one company of artillery. The palmetto 
logs having given way in some places, the foundation of the work 
is being strengthened by filling in stone, &c. At Fort Sumter the 
garrison remains unchanged ; the fort is being constantly repaired. 

On Sullivan's Island heavy rifle-pits have been thrown up, con- 
necting some of the batteries. Besides the heavy artillery, there is 
still one light battery on the island ; one light battery is also reported 
as being at Mount Pleasant. 

I am badly informed as to the infantry force in this neighborhood, 
but have understood that Evans' brigade has lately left the vicin- 
ity for Virginia. I have considered it my duty of late to harass the 
enemy on my front as much as possible, in order to interfere with " 
his movements. From information received from a deserter, I 
understand General Beauregard recently kept five regiments who 
were on their way north in Charleston for some days in apprehen- 
sion of an attack on James Island, and the artillery on the island 
were kept at their guns during the night. A reconnoitering party 
sent to John's Island the latter part of last week met with infantry, 
cavalry, and artillery, but in- small force. 

The enemy fires very seldom from his batteries on James and 
Sullivan's Islands, and at Fort Putnam only. On the night of the 



Chap. XLVlI.l • CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — ^UNION. 73 

21st-23d he opened very briskly and fired 60 shots in quick succes- 
sion-^at Fort Putnam, killing 1 man of the Fifty-fourth Massachu- 
setts, who was on outpost duty. 

It seems that the enemy did not know what to make of the many 
steamers coming and going last week ; was constantly in expecta- 
tion of an attack and became nervous. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding District. 



Special Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department op the South,, 

No. 187. S Hilton Head, S. C, April 37, 1864. 

I. The following-named regiment of the Tenth Army Corps will 
proceed to Fortress Monroe, and the commanding ofiicer will report 
to Maj. Gen. B. F. Butler, commanding Department of Virginia and 
North Carolina : Fifty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers. They will 
take their camp and garrison equipage and ] 00 rounds of ammuni- 
tion, 40 rounds with the men and 60 in boxes. The quartermaster's 
department will furnish transportation. 

II. So much of paragraph 4 of Special Orders, No. 184, current 
series, from these headquarters, as directs the Twenty-fifth Ohio 
Volunteers to proceed to Jacksonville and report to Brig. Gen. Will- 
iam Birney, commanding District of Florida, is hereby counter- 
manded. The regiment will disembark at Hilton Head and report, 
to the post commander. 

if * * * * If Hf 

Bv command of Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore : 

ED. W. SMITH, 

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.. 



Headquarters Department of the South,, 

Hilton Head, S. C, April 37, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. J. P. Hatch, 

U. S. Volunteers: 

General : In compliance with orders from the General-in-Chief, I 
shall in a few days turn over the command of this department to 
you. 

I take with me a portion of the command, by the same authority,, 
leaving behind between 18,000 and 19,000 effective men of all arms, 
including 800 veterans due from furlough. I deem this force more 
than sufficient to hold all the positions we now occupy upon this 
coast, besides conducting to a considerable extent efliective opera- 
tions in Florida. 

The force left behind occupies three distinct districts of country,, 
each intended to be independent of the other for its defense. Witb 
our facilities for water transportation, troops can rapidly be moved 
from one district to another in case of necessity. The districts re- 
ferred to are as follows : 

First. The position in front of Charleston, comprising Morris andi 
Folly Islands and the outposts or pickets siipplied from them. These' 
islands are both strongly fortified with works capable of resisting' 
an assault, and the force left there is more than sufficient for theiir 



74 S. 0., FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

defense. Abreast of Morris Island lie the principal part of the 
blockading fleet. Inside of the Stone and behind Folly Island there 
has been always an ample naval force. The works for the defense 
of these islands and their outposts are mostly inclosed, are sur- 
rounded with formidable obstacles, and are perfectly safe against 
sudden assault if held with even moderate vigilance. Mj instruc- 
tions have been to close the barrier, or gate, at the entrance every 
evening at sunset and not open it until sunrise in the morning. I 
announced those instructions to you as of great importance. If 
properly carried out, the position on the islands in front of Charles- 
ton, with the cordial co-operation which the navy has always 
afforded, would be securely held by 4,000 men. The force which I 
leave behind would justify the keeping of from 6,000 to 7,000 men 
on Morris and Folly Islands without hazarding the security of other 
points. 

Second. The district around Port Royal Harbor, including Port 
Royal Island and Fort Pulaski, our depots on Hilton Head Island, 
and machine-shops at Land's End, Saint Helena Island. Five thou- 
sand men would be ample for the defense of this district. Between 
6,000 and 7,000 men will be available for it without risking other 
points. The town of Beaufort and our depot at Hilton Head are 
both well fortified. A permanent garrison of 200 experienced artil- 
lerists is enough for Fort Pulaski. The orders are to keep both 
draw bridges raised during the night time. Big Tybee Island is 
occupied by a picket sent from Fort Pulaski. Ample naval co- 
operation has been afforded in this district. Hilton Head and Port 
Royal Islands are surrounded by deep water, navigable by gun- 
boats. An armed transport has always been attached to the com- 
mand on Port Royal Island, and another to the command on Hilton 
Head Island for patrolling the waters. 

Third. The District of Florida, with which you are familiar, hav- 
ing been recently in command there for several weeks. Prior to the 
recent occupation of the west bank of the Saint John's River our 
troops occupied but two points in that State, each with a small 
force, viz, Saint Augustine and Amelia Island. I recommend the 
permanent occupation of Saint John's River as high as Jacksonville 
at least, and as much higher as possible. A small force can hold 
Jacksonville against anything but a regular siege. Five thousand 
men will be available for service in Florida, leaving in each of the 
other two districts the maximum force which I have mentioned 
above. I shotild deem 4,000 men ample in Florida. Of this I should 
keep 1,000 mounted and moving. Among the troops left behind are 
a battalion of the First New York Volunteer Engineers, eleven com- 
panies of the Third Rhode Island Heavy Artillery, twenty-six pieces 
of field artillery, of which fourteen are fully equipped and the 
others will be. There are plenty of guns in position in all the in- 
trenchments and fortifications in the department. My own opinion-^ 
is that 15,000 experienced troops would be sufficient to hold our 
positions on this coast. I leave more than that by over 3,000 men, 
because four of the regiments are new. Two of the regiments in- 
cluded' in the order to move (viz, One hundred and fourth and Fifty- 
second Pennsylvania Volunteers) are left behind until they can be 
relieved by other troops or you are willing to spare them. They are 
part of Davis' brigade, the balance of which has gone. Colonel 
Davis himself I have placed in command of the District of Saint 
Helena Island, Hilton Head, and Fort Pulaski. 



Oiup. XLVH.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — tJNION. V5 



I appreliend no trouble in this department from the land forces of 
the enemy, beyond small raiding parties, but should the rebel rams 
in Charleston Harbor ever succeed in breaking the blockade, you 
may look for them to visit this place. The heavy guns in Fort 
Welles and Fort Seward should be kept ready for them. The marine 
transportation of this department is, and always has been, very 
liberal. It includes at the present time thirty-eight steamers, of 
which three or four may possibly be detained in the Department of 
Virginia and North Carolina. I take with me the legal staff of the 
Tenth Army Corps, also 1 officer of the ordnance department, leav- 
ing 1 behind ; 1 oiiicer of the U. S. Engineers, leaving 2 behind ; 4 
assistant quartermasters of volunteers, leaving 8 behind; 5 commis- 
saries of subsistence, leaving 5 behind, and a minimum number of 
the medical staff. 

I inclose herewith a detailed statement* of the force left in the de- 
partment, and its disposition at the present time. 

It is reported, unofficially, that the naval force has been removed 
from the Stono and Folly Rivers. I hope this is not so. Several 
days since I applied to Commodore Rowan, requesting that a strong 
force might be kept there. I mentioned three gun-boats as suffi- 
cient. I also asked that a gun-boat might be placed in Light-House 
Inlet, the one that was there formerly having been removed for 
repairs. 

Last summer it was rumored that the enemy were deepening 
Wappoo Cut to enable them to put an armed vessel in the Stono. 
The barrier of piles across the Stono, commenced last fall, it would 
be well to complete. The opening for the gun-boat Pawnee to pass 
through was left in it. 

When I took command of this department in June, 1863, the effect- 
ive force was as follows : 



Present for duty 

On extra and daily duty 

Total 



Oflicei's. Men. 



l.-j, IBO 
2,303 



17,463 



At that time we held Seabrook Island and Ossabaw Island, which 
places have since been evacuated by us. From the force above 
enumerated, I gather together over 11,000 effective men of all arms 
for offensive operations before Charleston. 

Verv respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Q. A. GILLMORE, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Special Orders, { Hdqrs. Department op the South, 

No. 189. j Hilton Head, S. C, April 28, 1864. 

II. The Third Battalion Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry, having 
reported for duty in this department, is hereby ordered to proceed 
to Fortress Monroe, and the commanding officer will report to Maj. 

* Not found. 



76 8. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVH. 

Gen. B. F. Butler, commanding Department of Virginia and North 
Carolina, for the purpose of joining the Tenth Army Corps. The 
quartermaster's department will furnish the transportation. 

III. The following-named regiments will constitute a brigade, 
under command of Col. Thomas Bayley, Ninth U. S. Colored Troops : 
Ninth U. S. Colored Troops, First Michigan Colored Volunteers, 
Thirty -second U. S. Colored Troops.* 

By command of Mai. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore : 

ED. W. SMITH, 
Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Special Orders, | Hdqjis. Department op the South, 

No. 191. i Hilton Head, S. C, Api-il 29, 18G4. 

I. The following regiments of the Tenth Army Corps will, as soon 
as they can be relieved, proceed to Fortress Monroe and report to 
Maj. Gen. B. F. Butler, commanding Department of Virginia and 
North Carolina, for the purpose of joining their corps. Paragraph 
I of Special Orders, No. 187, current series, from these headquarters, 
is amended accordingly : One hundred and -fourth Pennsylvania 
Volunteers, Fifty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers. The quarter- 
master's department will furnish transportation. 

By command of Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore : 

ED. W. SMITH, 
Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Hdqrs. U. S. Forces, Hilton Head, 
Fort Pulaski, Saint Helena, and Tybee Islands, 

Hilton Head, S. C, April 30, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. John P. Hatch, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Hilton Head, S. C. : 

General : In answer to your verbal request that I report to you 
an estimate of the number of men required in this district for its 
proper defense, I have the honor to submit the following : 

Post of Fort Pulaski and Tybee : Fort Pulaski, 250 ; Tybee Island, 
50 ; total, 300. The defensive work on Tybee is a martello tower, 
armed with a 30-pounder Parrott and inclosed in an earthen parapet. 
This is more a picket of observation than for any other purpose, as 
the island can only be approached across wide marshes. 

Hilton Head Island : Four regiments, with an aggregate strength 
of not less than 3,000 men, one-half of which at least should be. 
white troops. Of these one regiment, say 800 to 1,000 men, will be" 
required for the picket-line from Drayton's plantation to Braddock's 
Point, two-thirds of whom should be whites. One regiment should 
be within the intrenchments and two close at hand outside ready for 
any purpose whatever. The most important point on the picket- 
line is Seabrook, which by reason of its being the coal depot invites 
attack. Any serious defense required must be made at the line of 

•Amended May 17 so as to authorize the commander of the District of Hilton 
Head to " make such organization of his command as he may think proper." 



Chap. XL VII.] 



CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 



77 



intrenchments, hence the necessity of the main force being stationed 
near them. I do not believe the enemy will atttoipt anything 
beyond raids, but there sliould be preparations for a more serious 
attack. The picket-boats will enable the island to be held with a 
less force than would be otherwise required. 

Saint Helena Island : Four companies, with an aggregate of 300 
men, will be sufficient for this island, and I think it will be safe to 
place black troops there, for there is not much probability of the 
enemy landing while we have a gun-boat in Saint Helena Sound. 
As this island covers Bay Point the force now there, 25 men, I think 
sufficient for that point. For the district: Post of Pulaski and 
Tybee, 300; Hilton Head Island, 3,000; Saint Helena and Bay 
Point, 325 ; total force, 3,625. 

I deem the above the maximum force that will be required for the 
defense of the district under any contingency likely to arise. 

I remain, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. W. H. DAVIS, 
Colonel lOUh Pennsylvania Vols., Comdg. Post. 



Special Orders, 

No. 195. 



Hdqrs. Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, April 30, 1864. 



VII. The First New York Volunteer Engineers, excepting Com- 
panies A, C, I, and G, are hereby ordered to proceed to Fortress 
Monroe and report to Maj. Gen. B- F. Butler, commanding Depart- 
ment of Virginia and North Carolina, for the purpose of joining the 
Tenth Army Corps. The companies above mentioned will remain 
in this department under command of Major Place. All orders or 
parts of orders conflicting herewith are hereby countermanded. 
The quartermaster's department will furnish transportation. 

By command of Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore • 

, ED. W. SMITH, 
Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Abstract from return of the Department of the South, Maj. Gen. Quincy A. Gill- 
Tiwre, U. S. Army, commanding, for AprU, 1864. 



Command. 



Present for 
duty. 



c 



Si 

as 






Pieces of 
artillery. 



General beadquarters 

Fort Royal Island (Saxton) 

Northern District (Sctiimmelfennig) 

District of Florida (BirneyJ 

Hilton Head District (Dans) 

Total 



53 
98 
196 
159 
151 



106 
8,380 
5,OT1 
4,085 
3,588 



160 
3,171 
5,918 
4,959 
5,015 



186 
3,844 
6,968 
6,547 



25 


6 


78 


10 


46 


17 







657 



15,230 



19,223 



18 



S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. 



IChap. XLVU. 



Troops in the Department of the South, Maj. Gen. Quincy A. Gill- 
' more commanding, April 30, 1864. 



NORTHERN DISTRICT. 
Brig. Gen. Alexander Schimmelfennig 
Folly Island. ■ 

Col. Leopold von Gilsa. 



Little Folly Island. 
Col. William Heine. 



5Sth Massachusetts (colored), Col. Alfred 

S. Hartwell. 
103d New York, Capt. Frederick Tumt. 



41st New York, Col. Leopold von Gilsa. 
54th New York, Col. Eugene A. Kozlay. 
74th Pennsylvania,* Adolph von Har- 

tung. 
Infantry detachments, t 

Morris Island. 

Col. William Gueney. 

54th Massachusetts (colored), Col. Edward N. Hallowell. 
137th New York. Lieut. Co). Stewart L. Woodford. 
21st U. S. Colored Troops, Lieut. Col. Augustus G. Bennett. 
34th U. S. Colored Troops, Col. James Montgomery. 

Artillery. 

3d New York Light, Battery B, Capt. James E. Ashcroft. 

3d Rhode Island Heavy (Second Battalion), MaJ. George Metcalf. 

PORT ROYAL ISLAND. 

Brig. Gen. RUFUS Saxton. 

29th Connecticut (colored). Col. William B. Wooster. 
56th New York, Capt. Eliphas Smith. 
26th U. S. Colored Troops, Col. William Silliman. 
33d U. S. Colored Troops, Col. Thomas W. Higginson. 
3d New Y'ork Light Artillery, Battery F, Capt. Samuel C. Day. 

DISTRICT OF FLORIDA. 

Brig. Gen. Wiuuam Birney. 

First Brigade, Artillery Brigade. 



Col. James Shaw, Jr. ^ 

144th New York, Lieut. Col. James 

Lewis. 
75th Ohio (detachment), Maj. George 

B. Fox. 

107th Ohio, Maj. Augustus Vignos. 
7th U. S. Colored Troops, Lieut Col. 
Llewellyn F. Haskell. 

Jacksonville. 

75th Ohio Mounted, Col. Andrew L. 

Harris. 
35th U. S. Colored Troops, Col. James 

C. Beecher. 

Signal Detachment, Lieut. Theodore C. 
Vidal. 

Femandina. 

Col, Philip P. Brown, Jr. 

157th New York (six companies), Col. 
Philip P. Brown, jr. 
21st U. S. Colored Ti-oops (recruits), 
Capt. Mahlon E. Davis. 



Lieut. Col. Ulysses Doubleday. 

3d U. S. Colored Troops, Maj. Frederick 
W. Bardwell. 

3d Rhode Island Heavy Artillery, Bat- 
tery A, Capt. William H. Hamner. 



Yellow Bluff. 

8th U. S. Colored Troops, Capt. Ro- 
manzo C. Bailey. 

Saint Augustine. 

17th Connecticut, Col. William H. 
Noble. 

IHeolata. 

157th New York (four companies), Lieut. 
Col. James C. Carmichael. 



*At Cole's Island. 



f Commander not of record. 



Chap. XLVU.] 



-UNION. 



79 



Hilton Head. 

Col. Charles E. Brayton. 

52d Pennsylvania, Col. Henry M. Hoyt. 
104th Pennsylvania, Lieut. Col. Thomp- 
son D. Hart. 
3d Rhode Island Heavy Artillery, 
Company B, Lieut. George W. 
Greene. 
1st New York Engineers, Company 
C, Capt. Vincent W. M. Brown. 

Bayley's Brigade. 

Col. Thomas Bayley. 

1st Michigan (colored). Col. Henry L. 

Chipman. 
9th U. S. Colored Troops, Lieut. Col. 

Samuel C. Armstrong. 
32d U. S. Colored Troops, Col. George 

W. Baird. 

Seabrook Island. 
25th Ohio, Maj. Nathaniel Haughton. 



HILTON HEAD DISTRICT. 
Col. William W. H. Davis. 

Fort Pulaski and 1)/bee Island. 



Maj. James E. Bailey. 

3d Rhode Island Heavy Artillery, 
Companies D, G, H, and L, Maj. 
James E. Bailey. 
Jrth U. S. Colored Troops, Company 
C, Capt. Edwin Post. 



Saint Helena Island. 
Capt. David C. Benjamin. 

1st Michigan (colored), Company G, 
Capt. David C. Benjamin. 

9th U. S. Colored Troops, Company B, 
Capt. William Cook. 

Invalid Detachment, Lieut. Wilbur F. 
Still. 

Cavalry. 

4th Massachusetts, Second Battalion, 
Maj. David B. Keith. 



General Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department of the South, 

No. 55. J Hilton Head, S. C, May 1, 1864. 

The following-named staff officers are hereby relieved from duty 
in the Department of the South, and will report for duty to the ma- 
jor-general commanding the Tenth Army Corps : 

Brig. Gen. J. W. Turner, U. S. Volunteers, chief of staff. 

Lieut. Col. E. W. Smith, assistant adjutant-general. 

Capt. I. R. Sealy, Forty-seventh New York Volunteers, acting 
assistant adjutant-general. 

Lieut. Coi. M. R. Morgan, chief commissary of subsistence. 

Lieut. Col. R. H. Jackson, assistant inspector-general. 

Lieut. Col. C. E. Fuller, chief quartermaster. 

Surg. J. J. Craven, U. S. Volunteers. 

Maj. J. C. Henshaw, judge-advocate. 

Capt. A. Mordecai, chief of ordnance. 

First Lieut. P. S. Michie, Corps of Engineers, U. S. Army. 

By command of Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore : 

ED. W. SMITH, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 



General Orders, | Hdqrs. Department op the South, 

No. 56. i Hilton Head, S. C, May 1, 1864. 

In obedience to orders from the lieutenant-general commanding 
the armies of the United States, the undersigned hereby relinquishes 
command of the Department of jjie South to Brig. Gen. J. P. Hatch, 
XJ. S. Volunteers, 

Q. A. GILLMORE, 
Major- General, Commanding. 



80 S. C, FLA., AWD ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVII. 

General Orders, } Hdqrs. Department op the South, 

No. 57. <i Hilton Head, S. C, May 1, 1864. 

1. Pursuant to orders from the lieutenant-general commanding 
the armies of the United States, the undersigned hereby assumes 
■command of the Department of the South. 

2. All orders and regulations established by Maj. Gen. Q. A. Gill- 
more, and now in operation, will remain in force till otherwise 
ordered. 

3. Capt. W. L. M. Burger is announced as the assistant adjutant- 
general of the department. All communications of an official 
nature for these headquarters will be addressed to him. 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Washington, D. C, May 1, 1864. 
Major-General Gillmore, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, South Carolina : 

General : Obeying instructions from the War Department, dated 
February 14, 1864, I have the honor to inform you that a number of 
copies of the President's amnesty proclamation, dated December 8, 
1863, together with copies of General Orders, No. 66, from War 
Department^ dated February 18, 1864, in pamphlet form, attached, 
have been ordered to be forwarded to you for circulation among the 
rebel armies and inhabitants in your front. The Secretary of War 
directs that, upon receiving the proclamation and orders, you will 
use such means as you have, such as sending scout and cavalry ex- 
peditions for this work, and that this distribution be made in such 
numbers that they cannot be suppressed. 

One hundred thousand copies have been ordered to be forwarded, 
which will be sent to my address in your care. You will please open 
official communications sent to me, sign the receipt, and forward 
them to the Adjutant-General of the Army. I have also the honor to 
inform you that reports of operations and successes in this distribu- 
tion will be called for by the Adjutant-General of the Army from 
time to time. 

I have the honor to be, general, most respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

R. A. ALGER, 
Colonel Fifth Michigan Cavalry, Special Commissioner. 

[Indorsement.] 

File and send word to post-office that all letters addressed to Col. 
R. A. Alger will be sent to these headquarters. 

JNO. P. HATCH. 



Hdqrs. District of Florida, Deft, of the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., May 1, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. Patton Anderson, 

Comdg. C. S. Forces, East Florida: 
General : I regret to be obliged to call your attention to a viola- 
tion of the flag of truce sent to my lines yesterday afternoon. Dur- 
ing the time my officer was in conference with yours, my picket was 
charged upon and one man captured (Allen Vankirk, Company H, 
Seventy-fifth Ohio Volunteers). 



Chat. XLVII.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 81 

I am confident, general, that this treachery was committed entirely 
without your knowledge, and that you will at once order the release 
of this man with his arms, accouterments, and horse, and will duly 
punish those who have thus compromised your honor and good 
faith. Until this is done, I can of course send no other answer to 
your communication. 

I am just informed that during the flag of truce sent in by you on 
the 21st ultimo, a similar attack was made upon my pickets, but 
without result, which by some oversight was not reported to me 
until this moment. It is evident, therefore, that some of the ofl&cers 
of your outposts regard the sending of a flag of truce as a mere 
trick to throw our vedettes off their guard so as to attack them at an 
advantage. Unless the laws of honorable warfare are better ob- 
served in future all communications by flag of truce Avill become 
impossible. 

I have the honor to remain, general, very respectfully, your 
obedient servant. 

WM. BIRNEY, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Military District of Florida, 

Camp Milton, May 1, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. William Birney, 

Comdg. U. S. Forces, Jacksonville, Fla. : 
General : I have just learned that while the flag of truce was 
pending yesterday, the ofiicer commanding my advance on the King's 
Ferry road, not being aware of the flag, made a dash upon and cap- 
tured one of your vedettes. I have the honor to return the man to 
your lines and beg that you will accept the asstirance of my regret 
for this untoward occurrence. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

PATTON ANDERSON, 

Major-General, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. Cavalry Brigade, Army of East Florida, 

May 1, 1804—11.30 a. m. 
Brig. Gen. William Birney, 

Commanding U. S. Forces, Jacksonville, Fla. : 
General : I have the honor very respectfully to forward to you, 
under flag of truce, one of your vedettes. Private Allen Vankirk, 
of Company H, Seventy-fifth Ohio Mounted Infantry, who was cap- 
tured on your right yesterday afternoon pending a flag of truce on 
your left. 

The ofiicer who made the attack on your lines, though ignorant 
that a flag of truce had been sent to your lines, is nevertheless cul- 
pable for making any movement without the proper authority. The 
case is now undergoing rigid investigation, and proper steps will be 
taken to prevent any repetition of such irregular conduct. 

Deeply regretting the occurrence, I am, general, very respectfully, 
your obedient servant, 

R. H. ANDERSON, 
Colonel, Commanding. 

6 R R — VOL XXXV, FT II 



82 S. C, FLA., AN0 ON THE GA. COAST. IChap. XLVU. 

Headquarters- C. S. Forces in Florida, 

May 1, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. William Birney, 

Commanding U. S. Forces, Jacksonville, Fla. : 
General : I regi-et that you should have had occasion to com- 
plain of an act committed by an officer of my command in violation 
of the sanctity of a flag of truce. You are entirely correct in say- 
ing that while your officer was in conference with mine, under flag 
of truce, one of your pickets was captured by mine. Of this, l;ow- 
ever, I assure you I was not aware till after I had dispatched the 
flag this morning, as per verbal agreement between Major Fox, of 
your service, and Captain Buckman, of my staff, entered into on yes- 
terday. As soon as I learned that one of your pickets had been 
captured, pending a flag of truce, I immediately dispatched a second 
flag to you, borne by Captain Walthour, Fifth Georgia Cavalry, 
and accompanied by the usual escort and the captured picket. As 
tills flag passes Col. R. H. Anderson, commanding cavalry brigade, 
in my front, as he felt somewhat implicated in the violation which 
had occurred, and being more familiar with the facts in detail than 
myself, he very properly added a postscrijjt to my communication m 
further explanation of the untoward but mortifying circumstance, 
and forwarded the explanation at once undei- flag to your lines 
before the return of Captain Buckman, bearing your reply of this 
date. Cajjtain Walthour and Private Allen Vankirk, Seventy- 
fifth Ohio Regiment, together with the escort, were fired upon by 
your pickets, and he was not permitted to deliver the note of expla- 
nation and the prisoner, Allen Vankirk. I make no doubt but this 
firing by your pickets upon my flag of truce, sent in good faith for 
the purpose of making prompt explanation, was done under entire 
misapprehension of the true state of the facts in the case, and I hojie 
to receive your assurances that I am correct in this opinion. 

I forward you herewith my former communication* retiirning Pri- 
vate Allen Vankirk, improperly captured while flag of truce was 
pending, with Colonel Anderson's note of explanation appended, 
and also Private Allen Vankirk himself, again regretting that any 
occasion should have been given you of complaint in the premises. 
Be assured, sir, that the laws of honorable warfare shall ever be 
strictly observed by myself, and the same observance will be exacted 
of those under my command. In this instance, as you have been 
assured, a rigid investigation will be had, and the guilty shall re- 
ceive what I may deem just punishment. 

I am, general, very respectfully, yoiir obedient servant, 

PATTON ANDERSON, 

Major- General, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. op the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, May 2, 1864. 

Col. L. von Gilsa, 

Commanding, Folly Island : 
Colonel : The general commanding directs that you at once put 
the oyster-shell fort ' on Cole's Island in a state of defense, with a 

*See p. 81. ~ ~^ 



Chap. XLVIL] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 83 

view to arming it with two heavy rifled pieces and two mortars or 
field howitzers. The fronts toward Legareville, the Stono, and the 
two forts on the outposts are the ones that will be armed. 
I have the honor to be, your obedient servant, 

• W. B. DEAN, 
Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp. 



Hdqrs. District of Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., May 2, 18B4. 
Maj. Gen. Patton Anderson, 

Commanding C. S. Forces, East Florida: 

General : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt by flag of 
truce of your two communications, dated May 1, and that of Col. R. 
H. Anderson, of same date, and also the return of Private Allen Van- 
kirk, Seventy-fifth Ohio Volunteers, with his horse and a portion of 
his arms. I api happy to acknov.'ledge that my anticipations of 
your prompt reparation of the irregularity of his capture have been 
fully confirmed, and I have no doubt that the remainder of his arms, 
consisting of one Colt belt revolver, holster, and belt, and one 
ditto, pocket size, of which he was stripped when captured, will also 
be restored at the first opportunity. 

You are entirely correct in the supposition that the firing by my 
pickets upon the flag of ti'uce sent by you in the interval between 
the dispatch of my protest and the receipt of your explanation was 
intended simply as a notification that no intercourse could be per- 
mitted until the difficulty had been cleared up. 

I have now the satisfaction to state, in reply to your communica- 
tion of April 30, that Mrs. Jacob Mickler, with her daughter, will be 
received within our lines and afforded every facility to reach her 
home in Saint Augustine. 

I have the honor to remain, general, very respectfully, your obe- 
dient servant, 

WM. BIRNEY, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



General Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department of the South, 

No. 58. f Hilton Head, S. C, May 3, 1864. 

The following-named officers are hereby announced on the staff of 
the brigadier-general commanding, and will be obeyed and respected 
accordingly : 

Capt. W. L. M. Burger, assistant adjutant-general. 

Lieut. Col. B. T. Morgan, Fifty-fourth New York Volunteers, act- 
ing assistant inspector-general. 

Capt. J. H. Moore, chief quartermaster. 

Capt. T. A. P. Champlin, chief commissary of subsistence. 

Maj. J. W. Abert, chief engineer. 

First Lietit. C. R. Suter, assistant engineer. 

First Lieut. J. R. McGinness, chief of ordnance. 

Lieut. Col. Peter Pineo, medical inspector. 

Surg. Ebenezer Swift, medical director. 

Surg. Charles L. Allen, medical purveyor. 

Maj. E. D. Judd, chief paymaster. 



84 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. (Chap. XLVU. 

Col. C. R. Brayton, Third Rhode Island Artillery, chief of artil- 
lery. 

Col. P. P. Brown, jr. , One hundred and fifty -seventh New York 
Volunteers, provost-naarshal-general. 

Second Lieut. Alexiander F. Newman, First New York Volunteer 
Engineers, assistant provost-marshal-general. 

Capt. H. R. Clum, chief signal corps. 

Col. M. S. Littlefield, Twenty-first U. S. Colored Troops, general 
superintendent of the recruiting service for colored troops. 
' Ensign W. C. Hanford, U. S. Navy, aide-de-camp and superin- 
tendent of armed transports. 

Capt. L. F. Sheldon, assistant quartermaster and superintendent 
of telegraphs. 

First Lieut. E. B. Van Winkle, aide-de-camp. 

Bv order of Brig. Gen. John P. Hatch : 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Headquarters Department of the Gulp, 

Alexandria, May i, 1864. 
Brigadier-General Asboth, 

Commanding District of Pensacola: 
General : Your communication of the 16th instant [ultimo] was 
received to-day. The commanding general regrets that he is unable 
to aid you with the re-enforcements you desire. 

Active operations have required the concentration of all the 
troops of the department with this army. The commanding gen- 
eral hopes that tne necessities of the enemy east of the Mississippi 
will relieve your apprehensions before long. He has, however, 
ordered* a large regiment of colored troops to you, which can soon 
be made efficient in working the guns. 

The general commanding directs that you hold your position at 
Barrancas to the last extremity, and if compelled by vastly superior 
forces you withdraw to Santa Rosa Island and Fort Pickens, which 
latter fort you are ordered to hold at all events. The general com- 
manding does not wish you to construe these directions into a per- 
mission to evacuate Barrancas and retire to Santa Rosa Island and 
Fort Pickens to avoid anything less than the last extremity. But 
he depends upon your wisdom and ability at once to ^ake a devoted 
defense of your present headquarters, and to save Fort Pickens 
beyond a doubt. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. DWIGHT, 
Brigadier- General and Chief of Staff. "^ 



Washington, May 5, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Washington : 
General : You will receive herewith a special order of the War 
Department placing you in command of the Department of the 
South. You will be shown in the Adjutant-General's Office a list of 



Cbap. XLVIL] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 85 

the troops left in that department, under the orders of Lieutenant- 
General Grant to General Gillmore to move to Fort Monroe with 
all the troops of his command not required to defend, with the as- 
sistance of the fleet, the most important points of the department. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. W. HALLECK. 

[iDclosure.] 

Special Orders, ) War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 1C8. j" Washington, May 5, 1864. 

******* 

17. M^j. Gen. J. G. Foster, U. S. Volunteers, will immediately 
repair to the Department of the South and assume the command. 

^ ¥ ^ 4* •4' 'r *(• 

By order of the Secretary of War : 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Flag-Ship Philadelphia, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C, May 5, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. J. P. Hatch, 

Commanding Department of the South: 
General : I transmit for your perusal a letter* which was handed 
me after seeing you yesterday. Is it your impression from this and 
your own information that the rebels will be likely to increase the 
force of Sumter so as to render it a serious inconvenience to the 
works ashore or to the vessels ? I would suggest, if consistent with 
vour own views, that General Schimmelfennig be requested to come 
here and give his views personally. Will you do me the favor to 
return the letter after perusal ? 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, May 5, 1864. 

Rear- Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, 

Oomdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron: 
Admiral : In answer to your letter of this morning, I must say 
that I believe that the intention of the enemy is, if possible, to draw 
us from the north end of Morris Island. It is probable that should 
they succeed so far as to silence our water batteries, they may cross 
to make a successful raid upon the squadron. General Schimmel- 
fennig will be directed to come here for conference, as you suggest. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 

* Not found. 



86 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVH, 

Special Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department of the South, 

No. 200. i Hilton Head, S. C, May 5, 1864. 

* * * * * * * 

IV. Brig. Gen. George H. Gordon, U. S. Volunteers, is hereby 
assigned to duty in command of the District of Florida and will 
relieve Brigadier-General Birney, U. S. Volunteers. Brigadier-Gen- 
eral Birney will turn over the command to Brigadier-General Gor- 
don and will report in person to these headquarters. 

******* 

By order of Brig. Gen. J. P. Hatch : 

W. L. M. BUEGER, 

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, May 5, 18C4. 
Col. W. W. H. Davis, 

Commanding District, Hilton Head, S. C. : 
The brigadier-general commanding directs that you have Fort 
Miller garrisoned by a sufficient number of troops to man all the 
gims in the fort, the garrison to be taken from the colored troops in 
your command. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Special Orders, ) War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. IGfl. J Washington, May G, 18C4. 

* * * * * * * 

11. Brig. Gen. Edward E. Potter, U. S. Volunteers, will report in 
person, without delay, to Major-General Foster, U. S. Volunteers, 
commanding Department of the South, for assignment to duty. 
******* 

By order of the Secretary of War : 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 

Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Headquarters Tenti^ Army Corps, 

■ In the Field, May 7, 1864. 
Col. J. W. Shaffer, 

Chief of Staff, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina : 
Colonel : I have the honor to state, from information neceived 
from the front this p. ra., that General Hagood, with four regiment_5f 
and one battery, left James Island, S. C. , on tlie 5th instant. I i-e- 
spectfully request that this information be furnished Brig. Gen. J. 
P. Hatch, commanding Department of the South. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Q. A. GILLMORE, 
Major-General, Commanding.- 

(Indorsement.! 

Respectfully forwarded to General Hatch. 

J. W. SHAFFER, 

Colonel and Chief of Staff. 



Chap. ILViI.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 87 

Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. op the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, May 8, 1864. 
Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Assistant Adjutant- General, Dept. of the South: 

Captain : I have the honor to call your attention to the fact that 
I made application to Maior-General Gillmore some weeks since to 
have an additional supply of Hale's war rockets drawn frojn the 
North, a copy of whicn letter I herewith annex.* I would respect- 
fully inquire whether a requisition for them was f6rwarded by Gen- 
eral Gillmore, and if not, beg that General Hatch would order sucli 
requisition to be made as soon as practicable. I consider it of the 
highest importance, indispensable in my present position here, that 
I should be supplied with "this projectile. In no other way can I 
drive the enemy^s picket-boats off the creek and during the night 
out of the harbor. I need them further to drive the enemy out of 
various positions which I cannot approach with artillery. I am con- 
vinced that the surest and si)eediest way of obtaining the rockets, 
so as to have them here at the time they are needed, will be to send 
an oflScer for them. I would respectfully request that orders be 
issued for Capt. F. K. Smith, One hundred and twenty-seventh New 
York Volunteers, one of my aides-de-camp, who is thoroughly ac- 
quainted with the different varieties of the projectile, tvo proceed 
North without delay for the purpose of obtaining them. 

I have the honor to be. very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. SGHIMMELFENNIG, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding, 



Headquarters U. S. Forces, 

Morris Island, B. C, May 9, 1864. 
Brigadier-General Schimmelpennms, 

Comdg. Northern District, Department of the South: 
General, : I have the honor to report that 13 refugees (colored), 
8 men and 4 women, landed at Fort Putnam on the night of the Cth 
instant from Wando River, about 7 miles from Charleston. They 
rei>ort at the present moment there are no troops in the environs of 
tlie city, and that the batteries in rear are but few in number and 
hardly any guns mounted in them. They further state that most of 
• the torpedoes have been removed from the harbor and that appar- 
ently there is no fear on the part of the enemy of oiir making an at- 
tack by that route. Much damage in the city is also reported to have 
taken place from our shells and many buildings destroyed. Within 
two weeks also two blockade-runners have entered and left by Beach 
Inlet, by way of the creek on the other side of Sullivan's Island. 
One of the refugees was a servant of Captain Lesesne, on duty at 
Castle Pinckney. Having received a pass lie seized the opportunity 
to escape amd left Charleston last Thursday. He rejiorts that there 
are three rams completed with torpedoes on the bow. Two of them 
are armed with six 33-pounders, rifled, each, named the Chicora and 
Palmetto State. The other the Charleston, four guns only, same 
'description. At Castle Pinckney he states that there is a 10-inch co- 
lumbiad and one 9-inch columbiad and a 43-pouiider rifle. It is also 
:stated that a number of troops .>vith General Beauregard have gone 
'to Richmond. 

*See pTco! 



88 S. C, FLA,, AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVII. 

These refugees are from the plantation of Daniel Lesesne, Christ 
Church Parish, near Wando River, uncle of Captain Lesesne, of the 
First South Carolina Heavy Artillery ; they escaped in a small boat, 
passing the city. Forts Ripley, Johnson, and Sumter, leaving about 
10 p. ra. on the 6th instant. They being field hands their report is 
rather vague and much credence cannot be attached to the minutia 
of it, though on the whole it tallies with the information previously 
in our possessioii 

I have the honor also to append the report* of the chief medical 
officer in regard to their .physical fitness for military duty. 

I have the honor to be, general, your obedient servart, 

WM. GURNEY, 
Colonel 127th New York Volunteers, Commanding Post. 



Hdqrs. District op Florida, Dept. op the South, 

Jacksonville, May 9, 1864. 
Col. J. C. Beecher, 

Commanding Thirty-fifth U. S. Colored Troops: 
Colonel : I have the honor, by the direction of Brigadier-General 
Gordon, commanding district, to acknowledge the receipt of your 
letter of the 8th May, addressed to Lieut. R. M. Hall, acting assistant . 
adjutant-general. 

Rations will be sent up by your quartermaster, who will also take 
with him enough baggage to make yourself and officers comfortable. 
The men must hut, as the general has not determined whether to 
withdraw your forces or not. You will take command of all the 
troops at Picolata, allowing Lieut. Col. J. C. Carmichael to follow 
out the plan of picketing the river which he has hitherto adopted. 
The general desires the greatest vigilance to be exercised in watch- 
ing for torpedoes. The Harriet A. Weed was to-day blown up by 
one in the river below Jacksonville. Five men were killed, and the 
vessel was a total loss. 

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOHN C. GRAY, Jr., 
Second Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp. 



Headquarters District op West Florida, 

Barrancas, May 9, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. William Dw^ight, 

Chief of Staff, Department of the Gulf : 

General : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
favor of April 26 and beg to report everything safe and quiet. 

The Eighty-second Regiment U. S. Infantry (colored), Zulavsky 
commanding, has arrived, but the Twenty-fifth U. S. Infantry (col^ 
ored) has hot yet complied with department Field Orders, No. 26, 
and is not heard of. 

In my report to General Stone, of April 22, No. 227, I stated that 
the larger portion of the troops concentrated at Pollard started sud- 
dently on railroad for Dalton or Richmond (about 7,000 in number), 
leaving at Pollard 3,000 ; at McDade's Pond between the Yellow and 
Pea Rivers, 2,000; near Milton, 1,000; at Canoe Railroad Station, 16 
miles below Pollard, 700; near Pensacola, 1,500; near the mouth of 

* Omitted. ~~~~" 



Chap. XLVII.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 89 

the Perdido, 200; in all, about 8,000. Now I have information from 
three different sources that the majority of those troops have also 
been ordered up or down the railroad, leaving only the First Ala- 
bama Infantry at Pollard, and Colonel Maury's Fifteenth Confeder- 
ate Cavalry, with six additional companies of cavalry, this side of 
Pollard and between the Perdido and Y ellow Water Rivers. 

The report of John J. Moore, who came last night from Mobile,, 
via Pollard, is, if true, of great importance, and I beg to inclose a 
copy of his statement,* asserting that a combined attack on New Or- 
leans by river and by land is decided upon. Mr. Moore leaves this 
evening by steamer for New Orleans to report to Major-General 
Reynolds, with Mobile papers containing the news from Port Hud- 
son and the Rapidan. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ASBOTH, 
Brigadier- General. 

P. S. — I beg to add that I have handed a copy of Mr. Moore's in- 
closed statement to Admiral D. G. Farragut, for his information, 
sending also Mr. Moore himself to the admiral's flag-ship. 

ASBOTH. 



General Orders, | Hdqrs. Department op the South, 

No. 63. i Hilton Head, S. C, May 11, 1864. 

The following quarantinc'regulations for the port of Port Royal, 
S. C, will be put in operation from and after the 15th day of May, 
1864 : 

1. The quarantine ground shall be located in Tybee Roads or 
Roadstead, at the "old Savannah quarantine," the exact place of 
anchorage being designated by a white buoy and flag. 

3. It shall be the duty of the master and pilot of every vessel 
coming into this port from this date until further orders, except the 
pilot-boat returning from her ordinary cruising ground, to hoist a 
signal for a health officer in the fore-rigging, 15 feet from her 
deck, and come to immediately below and opposite the guard ship 
stationed half a mile below the inner buoy, and there wait his com- 
ing on board. 

3. The health officer shall visit the vessel without unnecessary 
delay, ascertain her sanitary condition and the port whence she 
sailed. And it shall be his duty to order to the quarantine ground, 
there to remain as long as he may deem proper, all vessels having 
on board cases of yellow fever, cholera, or other infectious or conta- 
gious diseases ; also all vessels coming from Key West, Havana, or 
any other port where yellow fever may exist. 

4. No communication will be allowed with the vessel until she 
has been examined by the health officer, and no person will be per- 
mitted to leave her. 

5. The fee of the health oflicer for visiting, examining, and certi- 
fying vessels arriving at this port shall be collected from all vessels 
except those in the Government employ or foreign war vessels, at the 
following rates : For each vessel from a foreign port, $6. 50, and for 
all others, $2. The money thus collected will be turned over to the 
medical director for the use of ^the general hospitals in this depart- 
ment. , 

*Not found. 



90 S: C, FLA., Aitt) OS THE GA. COASf. tSflAp. XtVlt. 

6. These regulations will be strictly enforced by the health officer. 
Should there be any deviation therefrom, or should any of the 
orders given by the health officer to such vessels not be strictly 
carried out, he will report the fact to the medical director of the 
department, for the immediate arrest and imprisonment of the 
offender. 
By order of Brig. Gen. John P. Hatch : 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilfmi Head, S. C, May 12, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. E. A. Hitchcock, U. S. Army : 

Dear General : The barbarous treatment by the rebels of our 
colored-troops demands immediate action on the part of our Govern- 
ment. The following suggestions are submitted to you, and if in 
your opinion good and practicable, might be laid before the proper 
authorities : 

First. All prisoners of war captured by colored troops to be set 
aside as a reserved class. 

Second. To this class add a portion of all prisoners taken in gen- 
eral engagements, in proportion to the number of colored troops 
serving with the army engaged. 

Third. When selections are made in accordance with paragraph 
2, let the larger portion be of officers or of men from influential fam- 
ilies. 

Fourth. All prisoners of the reserved class to be held for exchange 
for colored troops only, or for retaliation when such a course is un- 
happily found necessary. 

Fifth. The names of all prisoners of the reserved class to be pub- 
lished in the Northern newspapers, and also issued in such a form as 
would enable our pickets, advance posts, or raiding parties to dis- 
tribute them. 

I do not know but some better plan has been already adopted. 
The method of retaliation by death would, I fear, cause foreign 
nations to interfere with the war. 

Should you like the plan proposed by me, I would like a line from 
you on the subject. 

Very truly, yours, 

J NO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, May 12, 1864. 

Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron: 
Admiral : I have received an order .directing Maj. Gen. J. G. Fos- 
ter to take command of the. Department of the South. The general 
will be here by the first steamer. He will be in command at the 
time we had fixed upon for the expedition, and as I do not think it 



Chap. XLVfl.1 CORRESPOifI>ENCfe, ETC. tJNlON. &1 

proper to saddle upon him an expedition to which! he might be op- 
posed, the further consideration of it had better be postponed until 
his arrival. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. op the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, May 12, 1864. 

Col. L. VON GiLSA, 

Commanding, Folly Island : 

Colonel : I am instructed by the general commanding to inform 
you that a boat party from Light-House Inlet will proceed to-night 
to make an attack upon the block-house situated between Long 
and Black Islands. In view of this, the general directs, first, 
that you place a detachment of at least, 20 men on Pine Island, 
who may from there be able to render assistance to our party in 
case of any accident happening to any one of the boats ; second, 
that you keep a green lantern (and if that cannot be obtained, a 
white one) burning all night, suspended on the lookout on the right 
of Long Island. The general further directs that to-morrow morn 
ing you have your pickets posted on Pine Island, as they were be- 
fore. If the enemy opens fire on them you will have such instruc- 
tions given that your batteries on Cole's Island and Long Island 
will open on the enemy at the time of their relieving their out- 
posts ; the artillery with canister, and the rockets in one volley of 
twelve at a time. The troughs out of which the rockets are fired 
must be placed in position by daylight the day before. If you 
have not men properly instructed in the use of rockets on your 
lines please inform the general ; he will order some men from thf 
Rocket Battery. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. W. SCHAUFFLER, 
Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, 8. C, May 13, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. L. Thomas, 

Adjutant-Oeneral U. S. Army : 

General : Colonel Rand has just arrived in this department, 
expecting to find his regiment here, two battalions of which he 
had seen embarked at Boston for this department. He finds that 
General Gilimore has taken north with him two battalions, and 
200 horses from the Third Battalion, leaving 173 men of the regi- 
ment mounted in this department. I most urgently urge that the 
remainder of the regiment may be ordered to return to this depart- 
ment. 

For service in Florida one ihounted regiment is equal to four 
infantry regiments. The only cavalry we have is a small regiment 
of mounted iufantry lately momited, armed with muskets. 



92 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

Colonel Rand's orders direct him to report to you for orders, and 
I sincerely hope that the interests of the service will be found con- 
sistent with the desire I have expressed about the regiment. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, May 13, 1864. 

Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, 

Assistant Adjutant- Oeneral : 

Colonel : I have the honor to state that the effective force, nomi- 
nally 17,000 men, left by General Gillmore, is inadequate to the de- 
fense of the department. Nearly 4,000 of these men are raw colored 
troops. 

General Gillmore was instructed by General Halleck to send from 
the department what troops could be spared, and it was added that 
from a report made by him (General Gillmore) it was supposed the 
force would be from 7,000 to 11,000 men. The report referred to had 
been made by General Gillmore before he knew that he would 
himself leave the department. When the instructions came to send 
the troops north, the general learned that he was to accompany 
them, and then found that nearly or quite 20,000 could be spared, 
and that number was accordingly sent north. 

Some cavalry, 4,000 disciplined infantry, and two light artillery 
companies should be sent here without delay. It would be useless 
to send mere raw colored troops as they do not add to our efficiency; 
on the contrary, are an element of weakness. 

I would also request a reconside'ration of the decision not to call 
oiit troops for special service in Florida. I believe a regiment could 
be raised there that for certain services would be more useful than 
any troops we have. They might be called militia and be called out 
for three months. I repeat what I reported to General Gillmore 
when I was there in command, that the people of Florida wish to be 
loyal, and would be if they were assisted. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Special Orders, I Hdqrs. Department op the South, 

No. 208. J Hilton Head, S. C, May 13, 1864. 

******* 

IV. Brig. Gen. William Birney, U. S. Volunteers, is hereby tem- 
porarily assigned to the command of Hilton Head District. 

******* 

By command of Brig. Gen. John P. Hatch : 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Captain amd Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Chap. XLVn.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC, UNION. 93 

Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. op the South, 

Folly Inland, S. C May 17, 1864. 

Col. L. VON GiLSA, 

Commanding Post, Folly Island: 
Colonel : The general commanding directs that you send patrols 
daily to Broad Island, who will examine the whole island between 
Long and Cole's Islands. They will always report to the schooner 
opposite the white house when going. These patrols will sometimes 
be made by night and sometimes during the day. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. B. DEAN, 
Lieutenant, 127th N. Y. Volunteers, A. A. A. G. 



Hdqrs. District op Florida, Dept. op the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., May 17, 1864. 

Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Asst. Adjt. Gen., Department of the South : 
Captain : I have the honor to request that the Twenty-fifth Ohio 
Volunteers, which has been under my command the past year, may 
be restored to my command and be mounted. The large extent of 
territory on the east bank of the Saint John's which it is now nec- 
essary to guard makes it indispensable that I have a full regiment 
mounted. The time of service of the Seventy-fifth Ohio expires this 
summer. I inclose the following letter from the major commanding 
the Twenty-fifth Ohio, expressing his wish to be again under my 
command. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEO. H. GORDON, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding District. 

[Indorsement.] 

Acknowledge receipt. State that two companies Fourth Massa- 
chusetts Cavalry will be sent to Florida immediately. The Twenty- 
fifth cannot at present be spared from the present post. The men 
of the regiment now on duty with Seventy-fifth can be retained until 
the arrival of the two companies Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry. 

J. P. HATCH. 

llnclosure.] 

Headquarters Outposts, 
Seabrook Landing, S. C, May 6, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. George H. Gordon : 

General : Permit me to take this unofficial method of addressing 
you and asking your assistance in receiving orders for my regiment 
to return to your command, -in which we have once had the honor 
to serve. 

I have with the Seventy-fifth Ohio nearly 203 men, which num- 
ber will swell my "aggregate present" to about 660, 500 of whom 
have three years to serve from the 1st of January, 1864. The 
Seventy-fifth Ohio Volunteers is now acting as mounted infantry, 
and after our men are taken away from them will have but few 



94 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVU. 

left. The regiment did not re-enlist as veterans, and consequently 
their term of service expires this coming fall. Captain Manning, 
who is now on his way to Florida, has orders to receive the men be- 
longing to our regiment now doing duty with the Seventy-fifth. 

Hoping, general, that you will do us the favor of having the regi- 
ment transferred to your command, and if possible mounted, I have 
the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

N. HAUGHTON, 
Major Tiveniy-fifth Ohio, Comvianding Outposts. 



Hdqrs. District of Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., May 17, 1864. 

Col. William H. Noble, 

Commanding U. S. Forces east side of Saitit John's River: 

Colonel : In the conduct of military affairs within the limits of 
your command you will be governed by the following instructions : 

First. Such disposition as will enable yoix to concentrate your 
forces without delay either to strike the enemy, should he attempt 
to cross the river, or to move into the enemy's country west of the 
Saint John's, should a favorable opportunity offer. 

While having in view this concentration, the troops may be so 
disposed that the crossings of the Saint John's may be successfully 
watched from the rigfht bank. The present location of the troojjs at 
Picolata,' Orange Mills, Saunders, Welaka, and Volusia are well 
chosen for security. Frequent patrols between these stations and 
further south, in the direction of Indian River and Enterprise, will 
enable you to scour the country, give confidence to Union citizens, 
and cover the river guards. Beyond these points keep your scouts 
well out to the front as far as Lake Harney and Indian River. 

With the large number of faithful scouts you have at your dis- 

Eosal, and with the strong interest they have in the work, it should 
e impossible for the enemy to threaten any of our isolated river 
posts without ample time for preparation and consequent security. 

I wish to impress upon you that I should consider the isolated 
guards at Volusia, Orange Mills, and Saunders eminently insecure 
without a disposition of scouts far to the front, active and watchful 
to announce the approach of the enemy. I am of opinion that it is 
impracticable to establish a depot of supplies farther south than 
the present position of the cavalry camp ; the advantages of a loca- 
tion farther south can be secured by patrols, the disadvantages of 
which are less than an extended transportation of supplies, with in- 
sufficient land transportation or by transports, subject to annoyance 
from the enemy's riflemen on the left bank. 

General Orders, No. 29, of the 15th day of May, 1864, from these 
headquarters, place fully in my control all available men within my 
lines. I shall send many of them within your limits. Such as are 
available as scouts you will organize and use immediately. Others 
you will use as the best interests of the Government may require in 
the commissary department as herders and cattle drivers and in 
the quartermaster's departrngnt as teamsters and laborers. Such as 
may be organized as soldiers you will report. 

I cherish the hope that before you are ready to submit the names 
of a sufficient number to make a military organization efficient, I 



Chap. XLVII.] COURKSPONDENCK, KTC.— UNION. 95 

may receive the authority to form them into companies and regi- 
ments as a home guard. You will caiise loyal citizens within your 
command to understand that while the Government of the United 
States is determined to give its aid and its power to their protection, 
it also demands their most vigorous assistance. Thus will their su])- 
port flow from their labors, and thus will their oppressed State once 
more take its place as one of the sovereigns of the United States of 
America. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEO. H. GORDON, 
Brigadier-General of Volunteers. 



Jacksonville, Fla., May 19, 1864. 

Brigadier-General Hatch, 

Comdg. Department of the South, South Carolina . 
My Deak Hatch : I have received your order relieving the Sev- 
enteenth Connecticut Regiment from duty at Saint Augustine and 
assigning Colonel Montgomery with his old regiment to that port. 
I deem it. so much my duty to repi'eseut to you the injury' I think 
this change will work to the service that I dispatch this communica- 
tion by the hands of my aide, Mr. Gray, for your consideration, with 
the hope that you may be induced to reconsider and revoke your 
order, at least for the present. I have assigned command of all the 
troops east of the Saint John's to Colonel Noble. These troops con- 
sist of the Seventeenth Connecticut, One hundred and fifty -seventh 
New York (six companies). Seventy-fifth Ohio Mounted Infantry 
(six companies), and Thirty-fifth Colored, Colonel Beocher. These 
troops occupy the region east of the Saint John's, and are posted on 
the river as far south as Volusia. While the cavalry scout as far as 
Lake Harney, my Florida scouts going much further south. This 
force constitutes the movable column formed under your sugges- 
tion, and though guarding the river is held in readiness to raid on 
the other side; is indeed at this time in a state of preparation to move 
into Marion County and thence south as much as circumstances may 
dictate. I only wait to hear from my scouts to order the movement. 
Some of my scouts are already operating on the trestle-work and 
bridges of the Florida and Tallahassee Railroad, being perfectly pre- 
pared with inflammable substances and having been gone some days. 
I have no one to whom I can intrust the movement across the river 
with such assurances of success and safety as to Colonel Noble. I 
have no one whose judicious management and whose admirable gov- 
ernment of the loyal people of Florida east of the Saint John's could 
equal that of Colonel Noble. I have no one who understands my 
plans, and who can so well carry out my purposes (the plans and 
purposes we discussed) as Colonel Noble. Colonel Noble is a man of 
experience, a lawyer as well as a soldier, a statesman and a gentleman. 
He has a regiment of white troops whose influence and whose pres- 
ence is much more favorable to the Government in winning Ijack 
loyalty settlers and refugees than could Colonel Montgomery with 
his colored regiment. I say nothing of posting a regiment of black 
troops in Saint Augustine, for that is a matter of feeling with the 
inhabitants, but I think the act would be exceedingly injudicious. 
I verv much wish Colonel Noble to retain command east of the- 



96 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. ICnAr. XLVn. 

Saint John's. I am just reducing chaos to order. Colonel Noble is 
working out my plans and organizing the loyal Floridians into 
helpers for the Government with marked success. For thtese reasons 
I trust you will allow me to retain him. I do not know when or how 
to replace him. I therefore take the liberty of asking you to recon- 
sider your decision, and leave Colonel Noble with his regiment east 
of Saint John's for the present. 

I am thankful for the victories, but I pine to share them with the 
old Army of the Potomac. 

Ever faithfully, yours, 

GEO. H. GORDON, 
Brigadier-General of Vols., Conidg. Dist. of Florida. 



Hdqrs. District of Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., May 19, 1864. 
Col. William H. Noble, 

Comdg. U. S. Forces east side of Saint John's River: 

Colonel : You will have received the order directing you to 
change the location of Colonel Beecher in such manner that Colonel 
Carmichael will command the post at Picolata. I learn from Col- 
onel Beecher that you have sent some of Colonel Carmichael's men 
to Orange Springs and Volusia. I think you had better place that 
portion of the river between a few miles above Picolata and oppo- 
site Palatka under charge of Colonel Beecher, giving him exact 
instruction as to the duty of watching and holding his command 
in such readiness that you can collect and use them when I give the 
signal. 

The portion of the river between Picolata and Jacksonville, or 
toward Jacksonville, will fall to Colonel Carmichael. I am so dis- 
satisfied with the way in which the river is guarded that I send you 
the following sketch* and explanation. You will see that this re- 
quires eight boats and will see the location of these boats. 

I have just received the advice from the best pilot on the river as 
to the channel from Jacksonville to Picolata. He thinks the most 
dangerous ground is that between Picolata and mouth of Black 
Creek. The pilot thinks if one boat was stationed at a point about 
4 miles north of mouth of Six-Mile Creek, and one at Picolata (dis- 
tance betweeiji the two places about 10 miles), these boats to patrol 
constantly until they meet, that distance would be well protected. 

Second position would be, one boat from 4 miles north of Six-Mile 
Creek, and one opposite mouth of Black Creek, to patrol constantly 
until they meet (distance about 11 miles). 

Third position would be one boat at mouth of Black Creek and 
one at Mandarin, to patrol until they meet (distance 12 miles). 

Fourth position, one boat from Mandarin and one from Jackson- 
ville, to patrol until they meet (distance 15 miles). 

I will send one boat nightly from Jacksonville, and also post one 
at Mandarin, so that you will have but six to attend to. I will send 
you more if you wish it. These boats should halt and challenge all 
boats they meet. I wish you would also see that sufficient ammuni- 
tion is supplied the troops ojE your command. See that all guns are 
in good order. Order Colonel Beecher to make a report for these 

* Omitted^ ' " 



Chap. XLVH.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 97 

headquarters of the condition of his guns and the steps he has taken 
to procure a change. You are again charged to locate this guard 
with precision ; to give definite instructions, particularly to Colonel 
Beecher. A very small force at the boat stations along the river 
will answer. The utmost vigilance is required. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEO. H. GORDON, 
Brigadier- General of Volunteers. ■ 



Washington, May 21, 1864. 
Commanding General Department of the Gulp: 

General : By direction of Major-General Halleck, Chief of Staff, 
your attention is called to following extract from inspection report 
of your department for March, 1864,. viz : 

U. S. FORCES IN DISTRICT OP WEST FLORIDA. 

I cannot without neglecting my obvious duty fail to report again the urgept need 
which exists for an increase of the force in this district, especially the garrison at 
Fort Pickens. The inadequacy of the garrison, even for its ordinary requirements 
of guard, picket, and fatigue duty, and of keeping the works in repair, was fully 
explained in my report of 20th December, 1863, and now exists even more strongly 
than before, the garrison being smaller than at that date on account of the dis- 
charge, by expiration of enlistment, of a number of men from Company K, Sec- 
ond tJ. S. Artillery, and the necessity is gi'eater, because latterly good evidence is 
offered that an active enemy in considerable force is operating on the line of the 
Montgomery and Pensacola Railroad as far as Pollard. 

Apprehension for the safety of Fort Pickens might reasonably be entertained if 
a force of a few hundred men were to move in the night with secrecy and dispatch 
and an attack by escalade or a surprise were attempted. A force of at least 20 
mounted men are urgently needed as patrols and vedettes on Santa Rosa Island, 
with an outpost some miles up lo give warning of the movements of an enemy 
and to secure the fort and garrison against surprise. The garrison now is so weak 
that the pickets are only advanced about 300 yards from the fort, and there are 
but 10 men stationed on picket, at a distance of nearly 600 yards from each other. 

Besides this much-needed small force of cavalry 150 infantry at least are required 
in addition to the present garrison to offer even a creditable defense, the present 
. garrison hardly being strong enough to defend the gates and posterns and man tlie 
flank howitzers. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ROBERT N. SCOTT, 
Captain, Fourth U. S. Infantry, Aide-de-Camp. 



General Orders, | Hdqrs. Department op the South, 

No. 69. J Hilton Head, S. C, May 21, 1864. 

The following-named officers are hereby announced on the stafif 
of the brigadier-general commanding, and will be obeyed and re- 
spected accordingly: 

First Lieut. Thomas J. Robinson, Twenty-first U. S. Colored 
Troops, acting assistant adjutant-general. 
First Lieut. Daniel G. McMartin, aide-de-camp. 
By order of Brig. Gen. John P. Hatch : 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Captain and Assistant Adjutant-OeneraL 

X E R — VOL XXXV, PT U 



98 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. IChap. XLVn. 

Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, May 21, 1864. 
Commanding Officer of the 

Naval Mortar Schooner, 

Folly River, near White House : 
. Captain : I am instructed by General Schimmelfenuig to inform 
you that parties of oiir forces will make an attack ori the outposts 
of the rebels on Johtfs and James Islands to-night, in order to get 
information. If it should be deemed desirable to have you open 
fire word to that effect will be sent to you, and without such word 
you will not fire. Our small boats will be passing up and down 
Folly River, and probably into Secessionvule Creek. You will 
please not stop them to-night. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. B. DEAN, 
Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, - 

Folly Island, S. C, May 21, 1864. 

Col. L. VON GiLSA, 

Commanding, Folly Island : 

Colonel, : Outpost reports have been received from different 
points along the line indicative of movements of the troops on our 
front. It seems the enemy has considerably weakened his lines. It 
is absolutely necessary at once to obtain full knowledge of the facts, 
to what extent the enemy has weakened his lines, and what part of 
them is so affected. You are hereby instructed to send out recon- 
uoitering parties, wherever you can, upon your front during the 
day, to keep a sharp watch from the lookouts, and make such 
arrangements as to insure the capture of some prisoners during this 
night. Prisoners can easily be made on John's Island ; as to 
James Island, if information cannot be otherwise obtained, the 
outposts should be attacked. You will request the co-operation of 
the commanding [officer] of the naval forces in Stono Inlet, and a 
landing should be effected on the right bank of Stono River, on 
John's Island, above Legareville. If the gun-boats do not like to 
go as far up the river as Captain Gibson did last time, rocket-boats 
must go up and cover the landing, setting the farm on fire. The' 
place where a landing can be effected is indicated on the map. The 
above are the instructions of the brigadier-general commanding. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. W. SCHAUFFLER, 
Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp. 

(Same to commanding officer, Morris Island. ) 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, May 21, 1864. 
Col. Leopold von Gilsa, 

Commanding Post : 
The general commandiiig has learned that bodies of the enemy's 
troops have been moving within range of our batteries, and that 
they have not been fired upon. The general commanding therefore 



Chap. ILVH.] COKBESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 99 

directs that whenever any movements of the enemy in force occur 
within range of our batteries they shall be fired upon day or night. 
This to be the general rule for the future. 

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. B. DEAN, 
Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. op the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, May 31, 18C4. 

Col. L. VON GiLSA, 

Commanding, Folly Island : 
The general commanding directs that you send a patrol in two 
light boats to Broad Island to remain during the night. One of the 
boats should try to get in Secessionville Creek at high tide for the 
purpose of assisting any men to escape who may become separated 
from their companies and left on James Island. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. B. DEAN, 
Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Hdqrs. District op Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., May 31, 1864. 

Col. W. H. Noble, 

Commanding Forces, East Saint John's River : 

Colonel : Your communication of the 30th instant announcing 
the capture of the small force at Welaka is received. I cannot think 
this could have happened had the officer in command been suffi- 
ciently vigilant. The Saint John's River is an obstacle which should 
have, made surprise impossible, particularly on such bright nights as 
we are now having. 

To avoid any further surprises you will immediately on receipt of 
this communication withdraw all your small infantry guards from 
Saunders, Welaka, Volusia, Horse Landing, and south side of Dunn's 
Creek's mouth. These points are in my judgment too far advanced 
to hold for any length of time, and offer too many temptations to the 
enemy to capture the guard with superior forces. You will imme- 
diately establish your cavalry so that the whole north side of Diinn's 
Lake and Creek and Haw Creek can be watched and patrolled by 
them. This line will be your southern line of position, though your 
patrols may go beyond these. So guard the river between opposite 
Palatka up to Picolata that a crossing by the enemy is impossible. 

I wish you to concentrate your forces as much as possible, that 
they may be instantly moved in any direction when the enemy makes 
his appearance. South of Dunn's and Haw Creeks and at all the 
crossings of the Saint John's, below these creeks, your scouts must 
do the main watching and must give you the most reliable informa- 
tion of any attempt of the enemy to cross. You can supply a suffi- 
cient number of them with arms and ammunition for that purpose. 
Select the best scouts and use them even as the enemy do the same 
thing. 



100 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVU. 

I will see you in a day or two and make arrangements about a 
move. I am only awaiting information from scouts. I want all the 
troops ready at any moment. I beg you will not allow the possi- 
bility of another capture of pickets. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEO. H. GORDON, 
Brigadier-General of Volunteers. 



New York, May 22, 1864. 
Hon. E. M. Stanton : 

I have the honor to request permission for Mrs. Foster, child, and 
servant to accompany me to Hilton Head. Will you do me the 
favor, to answer at once, as the steamer sails at 12 m. ? 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General of Volunteers. 



WAR Department, 
Washington City, May 22, 1864 — 9 p. m. 
Major-General Foster, 

New York: 
Your dispatch of to-day has just reached me. Mrs. Foster and 

J^our children may accompany you. I was a good deal surprised to 
earn that you had not gone to your command before this time. 

EDWIN M. STANTON, 

Secretary of War. 



Saint Augustine, Fla., May 22, 1864. 
Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Assistant Adjutant-General : 

Captain : I arrived at this place last evening, and to-day we are 
ordered on an expedition into the interior by General Gordon. 

Colonel Noble says he has not received the order to turn over the 
command of the post to me, and that he waits to receive it through 
the proper official channel. My leaving Hilton Head on the night 
of the 20th was more hasty than I liked, but in the high state of 
excitement in which I found my men, it seemed to be a matter of 
the first importance to get away with them as quickly as possible. 
The sight and conduct of the women had thrown them into such a 
state of excitement, bordering on mutiny, as I never saw before, 
and hope never to see %ain. It was all over with them as soon as 
we got away, and they are now. as gentle as ever. I have put a few 
of them in arrest, and have reduced one of the sergeants for refus- 
ing to assist in quelling the disturbance. 

I have the honor to be, captain, your most obedient servant, 

JAMES MONTGOMERY, 
Colonel Thirty-fourth U. S. Colored Troops. 

P. S. — The men had found liquor somewhere, but from whom 
they obtained it I have not Been able to learn. Some of the men 
were intoxicated, and much, if not all, of the mutinous conduct 
can, I think, be attributed to that cause. 



Chap. XLVII.l CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 101 

In justice to tlie men I will state that only a few of them are at 
all inclined to drink, and that the regiment as such is remarkably 
temperate. 

J. M. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. op the South, 

FoUy Island, 8. C, May 23, 1864, 
Col. L. von Gilsa, Commanding Post, Folly Island : 

Colonel : I have received orders this a. m. to make such demon- 
stations in this district as to cause the enemy to concentrate his 
forces in Charleston. These demonstrations must be made at once 
in order to have the desired effect. You will therefore — 

First. Order the commanding officer of Long Island to show a 
number of men in his front, and with unusual life to cross over 
troops ostensibly, say about 3 o'clock this p. m., to Tiger Island, 
where they should hide away. He should, however, not send such 
numbers over as to make the enemy's fire on Tiger Island effective. 
The troops must remain there until late at night ; must not return 
before 12. He should show his boat howitzer up the creek. Should" 
fire from the fort at the enemy's outposts toward the chiinneys at 
2 o'clock this p. m. 

Second. You will order a strong patrol over to Broad Island. 
The men should show themselves and remain there until 12 to-night. 

Third. You will order the commanding officer of Cole's Island to 
cross over at once with a force of, say, at least 60 men, to Battery 
Island. They should hide away as though taking a position as skir- 
mishers. The howitzer should be taken at once to the fort on the 
right. A rocket volley should be prepared at the bridge on the 
right, and at least 30 rockets should be fired away in three volleys. 
Planks should be ostensibly brought to the bridge on the right, 
and the bridge on the left should be ostensibly fixed so as to alarm 
the enemy. The firing from Cole's Island should commence with 
the rockets and howitzer at 4 this p. m., and at 6 o'clock musketry 
fire should commence along the whole line.^ 

Fourth. You will have the troops of the Thirty-second U. S. Col- 
ored Regiment ready at the wharf at 2 o'clock and. embark them 
on the steamers ordered there for that purpose. Besides those of 
the Thirty-second you should have at least 60 veterans on these 
steamers. Three rocket-boats will be ready at the same time, and 
the men will report to you. 

If the gun-boats should not go up, which they will be requested 
to do, the expedition will go without them, and start at 2.30 up 
Stono River. The boats will halt in the neighborhood of Battery 
Island, and land a small part of these troops there, but on the whole 
take such a position as to leave the enemy in an uncertainty whether 
we will land on James or John's Island. 

They will take shelter behind the piles and will lie in the river 
until late at night, not to leave before 12. The rocket-boat will 
advance further. You will furnish Captain Jungblut with 40 men, 
which he will command besides his company. They will attack the 
farm on the right bank of the Stono River, about 2 miles above 
Legareville. Captain Jungblut will receive his instructions direct 
from the general commanding.' 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding District. 



102 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. ICbap. XLVn. 

Flag-Ship Philadelphia, 
PoH Royal Harbor, S. C, May 24, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. J. P. Hatch, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Hdqrs. Hilton Head: 
General : I have received yours of 23d May requesting that I 
would detail a ship for guard duty in the harbor in order to put in 
force the squadron regulation. It would give me much pleasure to 
comply with your request, but the effective force of my command 
is so much reduced at this time that I fear it will be out of my power 
to furnish a vessel for the purpose. 

J. "A. DAHLGEEN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Headquarters District op Pensacola, 

Barrancas, May 34, 18G4. 
Maj. John Levering, 

Asst. Adjt. Oen., Hdqrs. Defenses of Neiv Orleans: 

Major : I beg to submit, in connection with my report of 15th 
instant. No. 324, the following additional information received from 
refugees and deserters : The iron ram Tennessee is over Dog River 
Bar, and is now lying above Fort Morgan with three other smaller 
iron-clads and five wooden anned vessels, ready to come out at any 
moment. Admiral Buchanan is in command with the Tennessee as 
flag-ship. They practice daily, and intend, after the arrival of the 
two additional gun-boats, to raise the blockade and then proceed, if 
successfiil, direct to New Orleans and farther up the Mississippi 
River. 

The rebels are working day and night a large number of negroes 
in building three lines of fortifications between Fort Morgan and 
Pilot Town. 

Rebel reports from Pensacola claim that Beauregard, re-enforced 
by Lee, defeated Butler, driving him back to the protection of the 
gun-boats. I confidently hope this news to be untrue. Mr. Moore 
has not yet returned, nor has he been heard of. I have five Florida 
men out in the same direction and expect two of them in to-morrow. 

Now is Jigain the time to make a forward movement from my 
isolated position, but I have only a small company of cavalry, no 
horses or arms for my 500 Florida men, who are anxious to prove 
their loyalty by deeds ; no horses for my battery, and no steamers or 
land transportation for my infantry. Two steamers with 26 mule 
teams and one good regiment of cavalry with 600 additional horses 
would enable me to accomplish great successes for the furtherance of 
our cause in West Florida. 

ASBOTH, 
Brigadier-General. -^ 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, May 25, 1864. 
Rear- Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron : 
Admiral : It was, until Jately, the practice of the ofiScer com- 
manding the vessel blockading Saint Helena to send a boat or boats, 
at night, up into Coosaw Sound, opposite the shores of Coosaw and 
Morgan's Islands. I am informed that this has been lately discon- 



Chap. XLVII.] CORRESPONDENCE, El'C. — UNION. 103 

tinuedi I would respectfully request that instructions be given the 
officer at present commanding on that station to resume such j)atrol, 
and to extend the tour as far as the saw-mill on Coosaw island. 
A descent was made night before last upon Morgan's Island, and 
13 persons carried off. Parties have also been seen reconnoitering 
the saw-mill, the destruction of which would be a serious inconven- 
ience to us. 

Verv respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding Deparlment. 



Flag-Ship Philadelphia, 

Port Royal Harbor, S. C, May 25, 18G4. 
Brig. Gen. J. P. Hatch, 

Comdg' Dept. of the South, Hdqrs. Hilton Head : 
General : Your note of this morning is received, and I will 
order vessels up Broad River as you desire. Please let me know 
by signal of the Cosmopolitan being about to start, say half an 
hour previously, and the gun-boats will move up at the same time. 
I will send instructions to the officer at Saint Helena to, resume 
the patrol which you mention. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 



Headquarters Department of the Gulp, 

Neiu Orleans, May 35, 18G4. 
Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: 

Sir : I have the honor to request that the quartermaster's depart- 
ment may be ordered to furnish Brig. Gen. D. P. Woodbury, com- 
manding District of Key West and Tortugas, with two strong side- 
wheel steamers, drawing not over 7 feet when loaded, capable of 
cavrying each 500 men ; adapted also to carrying horses, cattle, and 
freight. These steamers should be strong enough for constant sea 
service, and to be able to carry at least 300 men under cover. Each 
steamer should have four large boats. With these vessels General 
Woodbury is of opinion that he can interfere very successfully with 
the driving of cattle in Florida by the Confederates, and can pro- 
cure an abundant supply for his own command. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respeetfiiUy, your obedient 
servant, ' 

N. P. BANKS, 
Major- General, Commanding. 



Washington, May 2G, 18G4. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, DepaHment of the South : 

General : The Secretary of War directs that you order General 
Gordon to report in person to the Adjutant-General of the Army in 
Washington, and place General Birney in charge of the military 
district in Florida. 

Very respectfully, vour obedient servant, 

H. W. HALLECK, 
Major- General and Chief of Staff. 



104 s. c, fla., and on the ga. coast. lck*r- xlvii. 

General Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department op the South, 

No. 74. ] Hilton Head, S. C, May 26, 1864. 

By direction of the President, in Special Orders, No. 168, dated 
May 5, 1864, from Headquarters of the Army, the undersigned hereby 
assumes command of the Department of the South. 

All orders and regulations established by Brigadier-General 
Hatch, and now in operation, will remain in force until otherwise 
ordered. 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



General Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department of the; South, 

No. 75. S Hilton Head, S. C, May 27, 1804. 

The following-named officers are hereby announced on the staff of 
the major-general commanding, and will be obeyed and respected 
accordingly : 

Capt. W. L. M. Burger, assistant adjutant-general. 

First Lieut. T. J. Robinson, Twenty-first U. S. Colored Troops, 
acting assistant adjutant-general. 

Lieut. Col. B. T. Morgan, Fifty-fourth New York Volunteers, act- 
ing assistant inspector-general. 

Capt. J. H. Moore, assistant quartermaster, U. S. Volunteers, chief 
quartermaster. 

Capt. T. A. P. Champlin, commissary, of subsistence, U. S. Volun- 
teers, chief commissary of subsistence. 

Lieut. Col. Peter Pineo, medical inspector: 

Surg. Ebenezer Swift, medical director. 

Surg. Charles L. Allen, medical purveyor. 

Maj. E. D. Judd, chief paymaster. 

First Lieut. C. R. Suter, Engineer Corps, U. S. Army, chief engi- 
neer. 

First Lieut. J. R. McGinness, U. S. Army, chief of ordnance. 

Col. C. R. Brayton, Third Rhode Island Artillery, chief of artil- 
lery. 

Col. P. P. Brown, jr., One hundred and fifty-seventh New York 
Volunteers, provost-marshal-general. 

Capt. H. R. Chim, chief signal officer. 

Col. M. S. Littlefield, Twenty-first U. S. Colored Troops, general 
superintendeilt of the recruiting service for colored troops. 

Capt. Leslie Smith, First U. S. Infantry, commissary of musters. 

Maj. John F. Anderson, aide-de-camp. 

Maj. E. N. Strong, aide-de-camp. 

Capt. George E. Gouraud, aide-de-camp. .; 

Capt. Louis Fitzgerald, aide-de-camp. 

Lieut. Col. S. L. Woodford, One hundred and twenty-seventh New 
York Volunteers, acting judge-advocate. 

Actg. Ensign C. C. Neil, U. S. Navy, aide-de-camp, chief of armed 
transports. 

John H. Mars, chief marine engineer. 

Bv command of Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster : 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant- Oeneral. 



Chap. XLVII] 



CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.— UNION. 



105 



General Orders, 

No. 76. 



Hdqrs. Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, May 27, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. John P. Hatffh, U. S. Volunteers, is hereby assigned to 
the command of the District of Hilton Head, Fort Pulaski, Saint 
Helena, and Tybee Island. 
By command of Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster : 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Hdqrs. Dept. op the South, Office Chief of Arty., 

Hilton Head, 8. C, May 29, 1864. 

Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Assistant Adjutant- Gener al : 

Sir: In accordance with instructions of yesterday from depart- 
ment headquarters, I have the honor to submit the following report 
of the condition of my department and the requirements necessary 
to make the same effective. 

The effective light artillery within the department consists of threer 
batteries, stationed, equipped, and armed as follows : 





Station. 


1 


Caliber of armament. 




Regiment and company. 


1 

■s 

a 

'Z 


13 


:i 

a K 

o° 


o oT 

u p 


s 
s 


3d Rhode Island Artillery, Company A. 
3d New York Artillery, Company B . . . 
3d New York Artillery, Company F 




130 

140 


2 




A 


4 


6 


Northern District 

Beaufort 


4 


140 




4 


4 












Total 


410 


2 


4 


4 


4 


14 









Batteries B and F, Third New York Artillery, have sufficient men 
for six pieces, to which number it is intended to increase them when 
horses can be obtained. Company G, Second U. S. Colored Artil- 
lery, is recruiting at Hilton Head and numbers upwards of 110 men. 
It is intended to arm this battery with six 12-pounder howitzers. In 
tlie manner above raentioned it is intended to increase the light 
artillery within the department to twenty-four pieces, which will 
allow a six-gun battery for each district. Required to horse the 
different batteries, each increased to six pieces, 250 horses suitable 
for artillery purposes. The remaining necessary material can be 
obtained from the ordnance department when required. 

The heavy artillery forces within the department consist of ten 
companies of the Third Rhode Island Artillery, with an aggre- 
gate strength of 800 men. Five companies are stationed on Morris 
Island, in charge of the important forts and batteries, assisted by 
sufficient details from the infantry to serve the offensive guns con- 
stantly when required, and the defensive ones in case of an attack. 



106 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. "tCHAP. XLVn. 

The mortar batteries on Morris Island are necessarily without full 
reliefs on account of the small force on the island. The batteries 
on Folly Island, which are purely defensive, are served by details 
from the infantry, instructed by non-commissioned officers from the 
artillery. 

Thirty shells are thrown into Charleston daily from the Morris 
Island batteries, directed at different portions of the city, and a slow 
mortar fire at different times opened on Sumttjr, with a view to pre- 
vent the mounting of mortars on the terre-plein. The armament of 
the different works in the Northern District are in good condition, 
and those on Morris Island ready at a moment's notice for offensive 
or defensive operations. Weekly reports of all firing, changes in 
garrisons, bursting of guns, with full history of same, together with 
accounts of the firing of the rebels, are required from the chief of 
artillery of this district. 

The different forts and batteries at Beaufort are in charge of 
companies of the Twenty-sixth U. S. Colored Troops, under the 
instruction of non-commissioned officers from the artillery. The 
armaments of these works are well cared for and readj"^ for defen- 
sive purposes. 

Four companies of heavy artillery are stationed at Fort Pulaski 
and one at Hilton Head ; the latter company is now instructing the 
First Michigan Colored Volunteers in artillery with a view to have 
them serve such works in Hilton Head District which cannot be 
manned by the artillery. 

The armaments of the works in this district are well taken care 
of. The details to serve as artillery from the infantry have not 
such opportunities for drill as I desire on account of heavy fatigue 
work now going on. Detachments from the artillery at Pulaski are 
serving on the armed transports May Flower, Thomas Foulkes, 
Plato, and Croton. 

Fort Clinch, at Fernandina, is garrisoned by companies of the One 
hundred and fifty-seventh New York; the forts at Saint Augus- 
tine by detachments from the Seventeenth Connecticut Volunteers ; 
the different batteries at Jacksonville by details from the Third U. 
S. Colored Troops. 

The departure of the Tenth Army Corps left us with infantry 
garrisons, many of which were wholly ignorant of their duties as 
artillerists ; non-commissioned officers and privates from the artil- 
lery have, however, been distributed as instructors, so that the 
different garrisons are in fair condition as regards drill. Copies of 
General Orders, No. 88, from War Department, relative to the care 
of field-works and -their armaments, have been distributed to the 
different officers in charge of forts and batteries and provisions of 
the order required to be observed. The small number of artillerists 
now in the department renders it necessary that every available man 
should be on duty with his special arm, and as many are detailed as"" 
clerks, orderlies, teamsters, boatmen, bakers, and attendants in 
hospitals, I would respectfully request that all detailed men from 
the light and heavy artillery be ordered to join their companies, and 
that no details for any purpose, other than in the line of their duty, 
be made from the artillery. 

Respectfully submitted. 

C. R. BRAYTON, 
Col. TJiird E. 1. Arty., Chief of Arty., Dept. of the South. 



Cbap. XLVtl.) CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 107 

Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S, C, May 39, 1864. 
Col. William Gurney, 

Commanding, Morris Island: 
The scout-boats in the creeks and marshes of this command are 
fired upon by the enemy oftener than is necessary, showing that 
they are too easily seen by him. This should be avoided, both as 
needlessly exposing life and as defeating our object of observing 
without being observed. The officers in charge of such boats in the 
creeks and marshes will have them trimmed around with a sort of 
hedge or bushes, concealing the men within, and making the boat 
very difficult to distinguish from the grass of the marsh or the 
shrubbery of the islands. 
By order of Brigadier-General Schimmelfennig : 

E. W. SCHAUFFLER, 
Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp. 



Hdqrs. District of Elorida, Dept. op the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., May 29, 1864. 
Col. William H. Noble, 

Comdg. U. S. Forces east side of Saint John's River: 

Colonel • The genei-al commanding district directs me to say that 
he sends you the steamers Alice Price and Mary Benton. Ho wislies 
you to embark your command and reach the wharf at Jacksonville 
before daylight, so that the men may be disembarked without being 
observed, and bring with you every available man and every boat you 
can find. He further desires you to relieve the men on picket duty 
from- Picolata to Jacksonville, that they and their boats may form 
part of the expedition. If this is found to be impracticable before 
daylight, let it be done after daylight, as that fact bj"^ itself will not 
excite suspicion. The general further directs that when you reach 
the wharf at Jacksonville you will move to a point within the forti- 
fications, to bivouac until further orders. A staff officer will con- 
duct you. The general hopes you will bring him at least 1,000 men. 
The general says if you cannot reach Jacksonville to-night in time 
to disembark before daylight to-morrow morning, you can wait till 
to-morrow night, but in that case you will send back the Alice Price 
immediately, and the general will send her up to you again to-mor- 
row night. ^ 

I have the honor to be, colonel, very respectfixlly, your obedient 
servant, 

JOHN C. GRAY, Jr., 
Second Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp. 



General Butler's Headquarters, 
May 30, 1864—8.30 a. m. (Received 1.45 p. m.) 

Hon. E. M. Stanton, . 

Secretary of War : 
I take leave to transmit to you the following extract from an ex- 
amination of a deserter from the City Battalion, Charleston Home 
State Defense. The same is substantiated by numbers of others ; 

They have taken away neaxly all the troops from James Island. First they with- 
drew one brigade, Hagood's, and sent Colquitt's brigade there, and we had but just 



108 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA, COAST. [Cbap. XLVII. 

arrived here -when we found Colquitt's brigade come here also. Some men from 
our regiments who came up from there to the regiment here and arrived yester- 
day say that there is no one there now but the workingmen and foreigners from the 
city ; those having business, protection, and the like. . 

This may be of use to General Foster. 

BENJ. F. BUTLER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters in the Field, 
May 30, 1864—7 p. m. (Received 1.40 a. m., 31st.) 
Hon. E. M. Stanton, 

Secretary of War : 
I learn from a reliable deserter from the enemy that the Holcombe 
Legion, consisting of 300 or 400 men, has gone to Charleston, and 
that Colquitt's brigade i3 to follow on behind them. They were 
sent in pursuance of a telegram received by Beauregard on Satur- 
day, saying that by the time Beauregard received the dispatch 
Secessiouville would be in the hands of the enemy. This the de- 
serter heard from Colonel Qaillard, of the Twenty-seventh South 
Carolina. 

B. F. BUTLER, 

Major- General. 

Navy Department, 
Washington, May 31, 1864. 
Hon. E. M. Stanton, 

Secretary of War : 
Sir : I have the honor to submit herewith a copy of a dispatch 
from Rear- Admiral D. G. Farragut, dated the 9th instant, in which 
he states as his opinion that if two 15 -inch guns are placed on the 
Old Spanish Battery at Barrancas, and two in an earth-work on the 
beach on the western front of Fort Pickens, the port of Pensacola 
will be rendered safe against the attacks of almost any enemy, and 
to request that prompt measures may be taken by the War Depart- 
ment to carry out the suggestion of Rear- Admiral Farragut. 
Very respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 
, Secretary of the Navy. 

[First indorsement.] 

War Department, Jime 4, 1864. 
Respectfully referred to Major-General Halleck, Chief of Staff. 
By order of the Secretary of War : 

JAMES A. HARDIE, 
Colonel and Inspector-General. 

[Second indorsement.] 

June 6, 1864. 
Respectfully referred to Chief Engineer and Chief of Ordnance, 
for remarks. 

H. W. HALLECK, 
Major- General, Chief of Staff. 



Chap. XLVU.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 109 

[Third indorsement^ : 

Engineer Department, 

June 11, 1864. 
Respectfully referred to the Chief of Ordnance. 
Captain Palfrey is now engaged In arrangements for repairing 
Fort Fickeus. He is about arranging the works for an armament of 
the existing model of the Ordnance Department and will introduce 
the guns recommended by Admiral Farragut as soon as the nature of 
the case permits. 

RICHARD DELAFIELD. 
Brigadier-General and Chief of Engineers. 

[Fourth indorsement.] 

Ordnance Office, 

June 14, 1864. 
Respectfully returned to Major-General Halleck, Chief of Staff. 
I approve of the recommendation of Admiral Farragut, believing 
that guns of heavier caliber than are now^ mounted are wanted for 
the fortifications of Pensacola Harbor. The four 15-inch guns will 
be supplied by this Department, and with implements, carriages, 
and ammunition, whenever the arrangements for mounting them 
are completed and a requisition for them is made to this office. 

GEO. D. RAMSAY, 
Brigadier-General, Ordnance. 

[Inclosure.] 

No. 167.] Flag-Ship Hartford, 

West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 

Off Pensacola, May 9, 1864. 
Hon. Gideon Welles, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington : 
Sir: I would most respectfully suggest that an application be 
made to the War department to have two 15-inch guns placed on 
the Old Spanish Battery at Barrancas and two in an earth-work on 
the beach, on the western front of Fort Pickens, as I think they 
would be sufficient to render this port safe against the entrance of 
almost any enemy. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

D. G. FARRAGUT, 
Eear-Admiral, Comdg. West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, May 31, 1864. 
Col. L. von Gilsa, 

Commanding, FoUy Island : 
Colonel : The general commanding directs that you send out a 
party of 100 men, duly officered, onto Kiawah Island, to be out two 
nights and two days, and thoroughly to scour the island. They 
will start either to-night or to-morrow night, crossing to Kiawah 
Island after dark, and proceeding as far as Vanderhost's farm. The 
next day they will lie quietly near the farm without showing them- 



110 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVII. 

selves on the Kiawah River bank. The second night they will ad- 
vance to the broken-down bridge leading to Seabrook Island, and to 
the point of Kiawah at the Seabrook ford on the beach. At these 
points they will remain until a couple of hours after daylight, and 
carefully observe any signs of the enemy on Seabrook or John's 
Island. The party will then return to Folly Island. While this 
party is out, the negro, Frank, will be allowed to bring in any of his 
stuff or cattle still on the Vanderhost plantation, and for that pur- 
pose Captain Gushing will fiirnish the officer in command with two 
wagons on his calling for them. 

You will notify these headquarters when the expedition is to start 
and who goes in command, and they will be accompanied by one of 
the general's staff officers. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. W. SCHAUFFLER, 
Lieutenant and Aide-de-camp. 



Special Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department of the South, 

No. 227. i Hilton Head,S. C.,June 1, 1864. 

I. Brig. Gen. William Birney, U. S. Volunteers, is hereby ordered 
to relieve Brig. Gen. George H. Gordon of the command of the 
District of Florida, and will report immediately after the court oj: 
inquiry, now in session, have dispensed with his services. 

Brig. Gen. George H. Gordon, on being relieved, will, in accord- 
ance with instructions from the Secretary of War, report in person 
to the Adjutant-General U. S. Army, at Washington, D. C. 

V •?* "P ■?• T^ ■(■ T^ 

By command of Mai. Gen. J. G. Foster : 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



General Butler's Headquarters, 
June 2, 1864—2.30 a. m. (Received 10.30 p. m.) 
■ Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War : 

I forward for the information of the War Department an extract 
of a letter, dated Charleston, May 6, 1864, taken from the dead body 
of Col. O. M. Dantzler, Twenty-second South Carolina Regiment, 
who was killed in an attack upon our lines this morning, and whose 
dead body is in our hands : 

No news ; all very quiet here. We are very short-handed now. The Twentieth 
[South Carolina] was positively ordered, and was ready to go, but the order was 
countermanded and it is now the only infantry left nearer Charleston than Sa- 
vannah. If we are allowed to remain quiet, all this is well enough, but if we 
should be attacked by any of the approaches to the city, I fear the consequences: 
The contingency is too gloomy to think about. 

B. F. BUTLER. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

FoUy Island, S. C, June 2, 1864. 
Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Asst. Adjt. Gen., Department of the South: 
I consider it my duty to lay before the major-general command- 
ing the fact that two regiments of this command have not been paid 



Chap. XLVU.] COKRESPONDEKCE, ETC. UNION. Ill 

since they entered tlie service of the United States, now one year ago. 
This unhappy state of affaire seems to have been brought about by 
some misunderetanding between the United States and the State of 
Massachusetts in regard to colored troops. Eor this misunder- 
standing the enlisted men cannot be held responsible, and they conse- 
quently should not be made to suffer for it. 

Letters have been constantly arriving for six months in these reg- 
iments, in which the wives of the enlisted men describe their suffer- 
ings and the sufferings of their families. Children have died because 
they could not be supplied with the proper food, and because the 
doctor could not be paid or medicines obtained from the druggist. 
Wives have proved untrue to their husbands and abandoned their 
offspring. Mothers advise their sons to throw down the musket 
and come home, it being impossible for them to live longer without 
their support. The effect of such letters on the minds of the enlisted 
men of these regiments may be easily imagined, and it reflects to 
the credit of the officers as well as the men that the efficiency of 
the regiments has not materially suffered under these trying circum- 
stances. 

I have ordered Col. A. S. Hartwell, of the Fifty-fifth Massachu- 
setts Volunteers, to explain the case personally to the general com- 
manding, and to beg the general to send him north in order to pro- 
cure an order from the Paymaster-General for the payment of these 
regiments as soon as possible, upon the law to that effect being 
passed. Sending the colonel north for that purpose would at least 
have the certain effect of keeping the men quiet while awaiting his 
return, and of convincing them that something was being done on 
their behalf which would prove decisive, whereas now many of 
them do not believe they will ever receive any pay. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding District. 



Headquarters District of Pensacola, 

Barrancas^ June 3, 1864. 
Maj..JoHN Levering, , 

A. A. G., Hdqrs. Defenses of New Orleans : 

Major : I have the honor to report, in connection with my report 
of May 25 ultimo. No. 363, the following additional information re- 
ceived from refugees and deserters : 

There are, besides the militia, but very few troops now at Mobile, 
Col. C. A. Fuller commanding. At Pollard are only five companies 
of the Second Alabama Infantry ; Colonel Maury has at the Fifteen- 
Mile Station, Seven-Mile Station, and Turner's Mill about 500 of the 
Fifteenth Confederate Cavalry, with three pieces of artillery at 
Fifteen-Mile Station. Three companies of the same regiment are 
still at and near Milton. The rest of the regiment are on the Per- 
dido. In the Mobile Bay there are outside the Dog Eiver Bar the 
Tennessee, Baltic, Tuscaloosa, and Huntsville, iron-clad rams, and 
the wooden gun-boats Selma, Morgan, and Gaines. The Nashville 
is not yet over the bar, but they.have already the camels under her. 
Two more rams are at Mobile, not yet plated, and One got aground 
above Mobile while coming down from Selma. Of the four iron- 
plated floating batteries near the dry -dock, one was sunk. 



112 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVII. 

The salt-works at Bousecours Bay, producing daily over 1,000 
bushels for the Confederacy, are now entirely unguarded. 

I am very anxious to make immediate use of the small quarter- 
master steamer Lizzie Davis, sent from New Orleans, although only 
capable of carrying 300 men, but on her arrival the quartermaster 
reported her unfit for service, and she is still at the navy-yard re- 
pairing. The engineer entertains very little hope of making her 
serviceable, and I would urgently request to have her replaced by 
another steamer fit for immediate use. 

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ASBOTH, 
Brigadier- General. 

Hdqrs. District op Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., June 6, 1864. 
Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Asst. Adjt. Gen., Department of the South: 
Captain : I would respectfully request that the Ninth U. S. Col- 
ored Troops, a regiment organized and mustered in by me, shall be 
assigned to my command. This regiment was brought by me to 
the department, and I received repeated assurances from Major-Gen- 
eral GiUmore that it should be restored to me. I would also request 
that the Thirty-fourth U. S. Colored Troops (Colonel Montgomery) 
shall be sent to me after it is armed. For these two regiments I will 
send in exchange any two white regiments now in this district. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. BIRNEY, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, 8. C, June 6, 1864. 
Mai. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff: 
General : I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of communi- 
cation from you of the 26th ultimo, directing that General Gordon 
be ordered to report in person to the Adjutant-General of the Army 
in Washington, and that General Birney be placed in charge of the 
military district in Florida, and would state that the above condi- 
tions have been complied with. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



General Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department of the South, 

No. 80. i Hilton Head, S. C, June 6, 1864. 

The following sanitary regulations for the government of the 
troops serving in this department will be strictly enforced by all 
officers having charge of districts, posts, or camps : 

I. Each camp must be thoroughly policed every morning and 
evening, and all garbage or refuse matter will be collected and buried 
in the sinks. Commanding officers will be held directly responsible 
for any neglect of police duty. 



Chap. XLVH.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 113 

II. Each tent will be raised at least 18 inches fron* the ground, 
and placed on a platform, no obstruction being permitted to the wind 
passmg freely underneath. The middle seam of the back of each 
tent, near the apex, to be opened about 24 inches, and a forked stick, 
10 or 12 inches long, placed across, keeping it open at all times except 
during a violent storm. An officer of each company will inspect 
the tents of his men nightly to see that this provision is carried out. 
The bedding and clothing of the men must be well aired every fair 
day. 

III. Great care must be taken in the construction of proper sinks, 
which must be screened by pine or palmetto branches, and the debris 
covered every morning with at least 6 inches of sand. Sinks will be 
dug on different sides of the camps, and it will be the duty of the 
camp police to see that only those on the lee side of the camp are 
used. 

IV. Commanding officers will require their men to bathe or wash 
themselves at least twice in each week, and change their under cloth- 
ing once a week, or oftener, if practicable. Sentry boxes of lumber, 
or small shade arbors of brush-wood, will be erected in the vicinity 
of all points where sentries are stationed. 

V. Desiccated mixed vegetables will be issued to the troops at 
least twice in each week, and must be carefully cooked in the follow- 
ing manner : Place the vegetables in cold water after supper, and 
let them remain until the next morning ; immediately after break- 
fast put them over the fire, with the water in which they were 
soaked, and let them boil four hours, adding fresh beef ; salt to be 
put in when nearly done. An officer of each company will be de- 
tailed to superintend the cooking of provisions, taKing great care 
that all food prepared for the soldiers is properly cooked. 

District commanders and officers of the medical staff will see that 
the provisions of this order are strictly complied, with, and will 
promptly report any failure or neglect of the same. 
By command of Mai. Gen. J. G. Foster : 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, June 6, 1864. 
Brigadier-General Birney, 

Commanding District of Florida: 

General : Having been assigned to command the District of 
Florida, I send you, by command of Major-General Foster, the fol- 
lowing general instructions, which you will have carried out : 

First, with regard to the general disposition of your forces. This 
will be made with a view to concentration and mutual support. 
The object is to hold as much of the country east of Saint John's- 
River as possible. You will hold a place at Jacksonville, west of the 
Saint John's River, as a base of operations in that direction, and also 
Fort Clinch, which commands the entrance to Saint Mary's Sound. 
The main body will be stationed at Jacksonville, or within striking 
distance of that point. One regiment of white troops will be sta- 
tioned at Saint Augustine. One regiment of mounted troops will be 
stationed on picket and scouting duty at the junction of the roads lead- 

8 R R— VOL XXXV. PT II 



114 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

ing from Picolata and Saint Augustine southward and operate from 
that point in any direction you may order, holding that point as a 
place to be covered. A force will be stationed at Yellow Bluff, with 
a small detachment on Saint John's Bluff. A permanent picket 
will be maintained at the railroad bridges leading from Amelia 
Island. A small permanent picket in Fernandina and mounted men 
to watch the shore of the island and the crossings from the main- 
land. All other pickets to be movable, and will not be suffered to 
locate themselves in any one place long enough to hazard their 
capture. 

The regiment of Florida volunteers, an order for raising of which 
has been ordered from these headquarters, will, it is hoped, furnish 
sufficient numbers for ordinary scouting and outpost duty. This 
regiment may be mounted if judged necessary by you, provided the 
men can furnish their own horses at Government prices. A detach- 
ment of Massachusetts cavalry will be sent down and will be re- 
mounted on horses previously turned over by them to the Seventy- 
fifth Ohio Regiment Volunteers. A portion of this regiment (the 
Seventy-fifth Ohio Volunteers) which you are able to mount may 
be retained as mounted infantry. 

The One hundred and fifty-seventh New York Volunteers will be 
relieved from duty on Amelia Island and ordered to Beaufort. The 
regiment to relieve them, which you will order to take their place 
from Jacksonville, will take post at Fort Clinch. The One hundred 
and forty-fourth Regiment New York Volunteers will also be relieved 
from duty in your district. Orders for them will be sent you in a 
few days; 

The duties expected from you with your command is to act on the 
defensive, guarding the points mentioned above, protecting the 
loyal inhabitants, and annoying the enemy as much as possible by 
occasional scouting and raiding parties. It must, however, be un- 
derstood that you are to abstain from destroying the property of 
Union citizens ; and, when considered practicable, you will commu- 
nicate to these headquarters all intended movements. You will not 
allow any accumulation of commissary or quartermaster's stores at 
other points than Fort Clinch, Jacksonville, and Saint Augustine. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

J. F. ANDERSON, 
Major and Aide-de-Camp. 



Hilton Head, June 7, 1864. 
General Halleck: 

General : I wrote you a private letter this morning, but as .J 
have a moment before the steamer leaves, I wish to add that if you 
desire me to act with caution in any demonstration that you desire 
me to make, that I will change the point of attack from Charleston 
to Savannah, where there will be less liability to disaster in case we 
do not succeed. I think I can make an attempt on Savannah with- 
out much risk. 

Very respectfully, &c., 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Chap. XLVH.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 115 

Office Chief of Artillery, Northern Dist., 

Department of the South, 
Morris Island, S. C, June 7, 1864. 
Lieut. W. B. Dean, 

A. A. A. G., Hdqrs. Northern Dist, Dept. of the South: 

Lieutenant : I have the honor to report that at daylight on June 
7, a small river steamer was discovered from Fort Putnam aground 
on a shoal 3,200 yards from the above-named fort. The position of 
the steamer was a point on a line drawn from the flag-staff in Put- 
nam to the left (enemy's) of Castle Pinckney. No boats were seen 
to leave the steamer ; neither did she have steam up when discov- 
ered. She probably was abandoned at the time of grounding, and 
the steam allowed to escape. The steamer was, at the time of run- 
ning ashore, returning from Fort Sumter to the city. Fire was at 
once opened iipon her with a 200-pounder rifle from Fort Putnam 
and one 100-pounder from Battery Chatfield. At 6 a. m., two 
100-pounders were opened from Fort Strong, also one 30-pounder 
from Fort Putnam. The effect upon the vessel produced by these 
guns was very good. A shell from Fort Strong carried away the 
smoke-pipe. The upper works of the steamer were struck many 
times, and are broken up. Thirty shells struck the hull of the 
steamer, causing her to fill and sink to a level with her decks. The 
guns in Fort Strong were ordered to cease firing at noon. One 
100-pounder rifle (Parrott) was burst in Fort Strong during the fir- 
ing, also one in Battery Chatfield. The firing from 12 m. until 
6 p. m. was from one 100-pounder in Battery Chatfield and one 
200-pounder in Fort Putnam. 

From daylight until 10 a. m. , the enemy kept up a heavy fire upon 
our works from the James Island batteries. They fired 284 shot and 
shell during this time. There were no casualties. The only dam- 
age done by enemy's shell was to the slopes and parapets of our 
works. The steamer is now a complete wreck, rendered so by the 
following expenditure of ammunition on our part, viz : 

Rounds. 

Fort Putnam 132 

Fort Strong 57 

Battery Chatfield 78 

Total 367 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. AMES, 
Lieutenant-Colonel Third Rhode Island Artillery, 
Chief of Artillery, Northern District, Dept. of the South. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

FoUy Island, S. C, June 7, 18G4. 
Col. William Heine, 

Commanding, FoUy Island: 
Colonel : The general commanding district directs that you have 
a few shots fired each day, until further orders, from 30-pounder 
Parrott guns on Cole's Island, to the rebel lookout at Legareville. 
These shots will be at irregular intervals and such arrangements will 
be made as will prevent the enemy from making any calculations as 



116 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. (Chap. XLVII. 

to when they will be fired, or from receiving any warning to enable 
them to get out of the way of the shots. You will give proper notice 
of this order to the gun-boats in Stono River. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. B. DEAN, 

Lieut., 127th New York Vols., and Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen. 



Headquarters District of Hilton Head, 

Hillon Head, June 7, 1864. 
Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Assistant Adjutant- General : 
Captain : Will you please call the attention of the general com- 
manding to the necessity of an increased naval force in Calibogue 
Sound, since the capture by the rebels of the Water Witch. I think 
the admiral should put a vessel of similar draught and heavier metal 
there, to prevent her making raids up the waters now protected by 
our light-armed transports. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 

Brigadier- General. 



Hdqrs. District op Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., June 7, 1864. 

Col. James Shaw, Jr., 

Commanding Post, Jacksonville :' 
Colonel : Information has been received at these headquarters 
that loads of torpedoes have been sent by the rebels to Fleming's 
Island, above Doctor's Lake, and to the point of land lying between 
Doctor's Lake, McGirt's Creek, and Saint John's River. These tor- 
pedoes have either already been placed in the Saint John's River or 
will be shortly unless active measures are taken against it. It ap- 

5 ears also that the residences of that part of the bank of the Saint 
ohn's are used for the purpose of espying the position of our gun- 
boats and picket-boats on the river, and the movements of our 
steamers. You are therefore directed to send a force of men, not 
exceeding 200, for the purpose of scouring completely the island and 
•point above mentioned, capturing any rebel scouts or pickets or 
torpedo layers, and especially one O'Hern, and causing all the loyal 
inhabitants to remove to the east side of the Saint John's, and all the 
disloyal to remove west and within the lines of the enemy. Especial, 
care will be taken to find torpedoes and to gain information as to^ 
where they are placed. 

I inclose you four tracings* for the use of the commanding officer 
of the expedition. 

It is recommended that row-boats shall be used for transportation. 
By order of Brig. Gen. William Birney : 

EDELMIRO MAYER, 
Major 7th U. S.-€ol. Troops, A. A. A. G. and C. of 8. 

* Not found. 



Chap. XLVn.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 117 

Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, Jtme 8, 1864. 

Kear- Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, 

Present: 
Admiral : Will you do me the favor to inform me when you pro- 
pose to visit the fleet near Charleston. 1 would like to go there at 
the same time to consult with you upon some matters relating to 
operations in that district. 

Very respectfully and truly, yours, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Engineer Oppice, 
Hilton Head, S. C, June 8, 1864. 
General : I have the honor to submit the following list of various 
fortifications in this department, their location, and object : 

northern district. 

Morris Island. 

Batteries on north end, commanding the harbor. Fort Sumter, &c. : 

First. Fort Putnam, armament, three lOO-poundfer Parrotts, one 
lO-pounder columbiad, four 30-pounder Parrotts, two field pieces. 

Second. Battery Chatfield, armament, one .300-pounder Parrot t, 
two iOO-pounder Parrotts, foiir 10-inch sea-coast mortars. 

Third. Battery Seymour, armament, eight 10-inch sea-coast mor- 
tars. 

Fourth. Water Battery, armament, two 10-inch columbiads. 

Fifth. Battery Barton, armament, two 13-inch sea-coast mortars. 

Sixth. Fort Strong, armament, one 200-pounder Parrott, five IOO- 
pounder Parrotts, two 30-pounder Parrotts, six 32-pounders, four 
12-poiinders, two 10-inch sea-coast mortars. This fort holds the 
upper end of the island. Those previously mentioned are merely 
arranged to prevent a surprise party from spiking their guns. 

The works on the south end guard against an attack from Light- 
House Inlet mainly.: 

First. Fort Shaw, armament, two 8-inch sea-coast howitzers, five 
8-inch siege howitzers, two field pieces, and two 10-inch siege mor- 
tars. This fort holds the south end of the island against an attack 
in any direction. 

Second. Battery Purviance, armament, two 42-pounders, two 
30-pounder Parrotts, commanded by Fort Shaw. 

Outwork an Black Island, armament, two rifled field pieces. 

Folhj Island. 

Work on north end commands Light-House Inlet : 

Fort Greene, armament, two 30-pounder Parrotts, two 12-pounders, 
two carronades, two mortars. 

Works on Pawnee Landing, -to protect store-houses and command 
creeks ; 

First. Battery of two 30-pounder Parrotts. 



118 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

Second. Battery of two 6-pounder Parrotts. 

Works at white house to hold center of island : 

First. Battery of two 30-pounder Parrotts and two 6-pounders. 

Second. Work in progress for fourteen guns and four mortars. 

Works at lower end command the Stono River : 

First. Fort Delafield, two 43-pounder James rifles, three 
33-pounder James rifles. 

Second. Fort Mahan, three 32-pounder James rifles. 

Works on Long Island cover approaches to Pawnee Landing and 
white house : 

First. Large infantry keep stockade. 

Second. Small fort, two 20-pounder Parrotts. 

Works on Cole's Island cover approaches to white house and 
Stono Inlet : 

First. Eastern Redoubt, commands Big Folly River. 

Second. Western Redoubt, commands Stono River. No arma- 
ment in these works when last heard from. 

Works on Kiawali Island cover the Stono Inlet from an attack in 
this direction : 

First. Lower redoubt, commands the beach. 

Second. Upper redoubt, commands all the end of the island. The 
armament of these works has been removed. They are held by 
infantry. 

MIDDLE DISTRICT. 
Hilton Head. 

Work to command the harbor : Fort Welles, seventeen guns-. 

Works to prevent a land attack : 

First. Fort Mitchel, ordered to be dismantled. 

Second. Line of intrenchments, undergoing alterations. 

Saint Helena Island. 

Work to command the harbor : Fort Seward, thirteen guns. 

Port Royal Island. 

Defenses of Beaufort : 

First. Fort Duane and rifle-pit, armament, one 8-inch gun, one 
33-pounder, four 18-pounders, one 12-pounder howitzer, two 24- 
pounder howitzers. 

Second. Battery Burnside, two 8-inch guns, one 30-pounder Par- 
rott, one 24-pounder. 

Third. Battery Seymour, two carronades. 

Fourth. Battery Saxton, .three 8-inch siege howitzers. 

Fifth. Battery Bray ton, one 10-pounder Parrott, one 24-pounder . 
howitzer. 

Sixth. Battery Taylor, two 30-pounder Parrotts, one 10-pounder 
Parrott, one 24-pounder. 

Cockspur Island. 

Works to command the Savannah River : 
First. Fort Pulaski. 

Second. Water Battery, two 10-inch columbiads and two 100- 
pounder Parrotts. 



Chap. XLVII.] CORKESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 119 

DISTRICT OF FLORIDA. 

Fernandina. 

First. FortClincli. 

Second. Small battery, to command railroad bridge, Saint John's 
River, and Jacksonville. Saint John's Blufif, blockhouse for in- 
fantry. 

Yellow Bluff. 

Two small works for infantry defense; in one a carronade is 
mounted. 

Picolata. 

Block-house for infantry, two 0-pounders. 

Jacksonville. 

The town is surrounded by a line of inclosed works (redoubts and 
lunettes), connected by rifle-pits. Beginning at the right, they are 
as follows : 

First. Battery Hamilton, open work for field guns. 

Second. Redoubt Reed, three guns. 

Third. Redoubt Fribley, four guns. 

Fourth. Battery McCrea, for field guns, between Nos. 2 and 3. 

Fifth. Battery Myrick, for field guns, commands railroad. 

Sixth. Redoubt Hatch, four guns. 

Seventh. Redoxibt Sammon, three guns. 

Eighth. Fort Seymour, four guns. 

Saint Augiistine. 

Fort Marion. 

The works in the Northern District and District of Florida are all 
in excellent condition. Those in the Middle District require exten- 
sive repairs and alteration. These are being made as rapidly as 
possible. 

I am, general, very respectfully, vour obedient servant, 

" CHAS. R. SUTER, 
First Lieut., U. S. Engineers, Chief Engineer. 



Headquarters District of Florida, 

June 8, 18G4. 
Maj. John F. Anderson, 

Aide-de-Camp to General Foster: 
Major : I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of a communi- 
cation under date of the 6th instant, giving me certain " general 
instructions " by order of Major-General Foster. Allow me to ask 
whether the following passage is written as intended: "One regi- 
ment of mounted troops will be stationed on picket and scouting 
duty at the junction of the roads leading from Picolata and Saint 
Augustine southward," &c. 



120 S. C.; FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVIl, 

This is not a clear indication of yonr wish. The road running 
soiithward from Saint Augustine does not intersect with the one run- 
ning southward from Picolata except at a point to the south of Haw 
Creek, unless we except the intersection of the trails at or near one 
of the crossings of Haw Creek. This is so far to the south, the 
country is so thinly populated, and transportation of forage and 
other supplies so difficult with the limited number of wagons left 
here, and our trains and couriers could so easily be ambuscaded, 
that I must believe that there is some error as to name of place. 
With the force of mounted infantry left me by the order taking 
away the men of the Twenty-fifth Ohio Volunteers, I would regard 
it as extremely hazardous for me to attempt to maintain a perma- 
nent cavalry post so far from all support. The present cavalry 
camp was selected by me after a personal examination of the place. 
It was approved by General Gordon after he had also made a visit 
there. It is at the junction of the roads running from Volusia and 
Palatka to Saint Augustine, and only 8i miles from the latter place. 
The position is the best I could select to cover Saint Augustine and 
the country between Picolata and the mouth of the Saint John's. 
Is not this the point meant by you ? 

It will take several days to execute the orders for the transfer of 
the men of the Twenty-fifth Ohio Volunteers for turning in their 
horses, arms, and equipments, and for mounting the men of the 
Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry on the horses belonging formerly to 
that regiment. Please instruct me by return mail. The only cavalry 
I have are 145 men of the Fourth Massachusetts, now dismounted. 
Colonel Harris' mounted infantry will be reduced to about 168 men 
within three days. Colonel Beecher's mounted infantry have less 
than 100 horses fit for service, and this number will be greatly re- 
duced unless there is a supply of hay and small forage received here 
within a week. Your instructions say nothing about holding Pico- 
lata, now held by six companies of the One hundred and fifty- 
seventh. We have there three pieces of artillery and a stockade with 
a small redoubt. I trust this is not to be abandoned. Prior to the 
receipt of your communication, I had already ordered the two pick- 
ets on the southern part of Amelia Island to be withdrawn and 
mounted patrols to be substituted. You direct a small permanent 
picket in Fernandina. This will involve a change of the coal depot 
and the removal of the pieces of ordnance at the rebel fort at Fernan- 
dina. Shall I have a coal wharf built near Fort Clinch, and re- 
move the ordnance to that fort ? I do not regard Fernandina as in 
danger, except from a coup de main for spiking the cannon in the fort. 
The order for the organization of a regiment of Florida volunteers 
contains a clause, " without limitation as to place of service," which 
will stand in the way of recruiting. Will you authorize me to raise 
and organize that regiment, making my mustering officer. Lieu- 
tenant Waters, the mustering officer for the men, or will you send " 
some one to do the work ? I find no special order here on the sub- 
ject. Will you relieve only that portion of the One hundred and 
fifty-seventh which is on Amelia Island or the whole regiment ? 
Two companies are at Fernandina and six at Picolata. 

When you order away the One hundred and forty-fourth and the. 
One hundred and fifty-seventh, I would ask to be allowed to retain 
the men detailed here as clerks at headquarters ^.nd at the commis- 
sary's and quartermaster's. I cannot find any clerks in black regi- 
ments. It will be a matter of pride with me to protect all loyal 
citizens and residents in their persons and property. 



Chap. XLVU.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 121 

There are no movements which I am prepared to recommend at 
present. At present I am scouting to find out where the enemy is, 
a kind of information of which I received none from General Gor- 
don, except that a rebel force had been sent down by rail. Within 
a week I hope to be able to have more definite ideas on this point. 
Very truly, your obedient servant, 

WM, BIRNEY, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, June 8, 1864. 
Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Assistant Adjutant-General : 
Captain : The country lying between Trout Creek on the south 
and Thomas' Swamp and Creek, Nassau River, and the Saint John's 
on the north, east, and southeast, has been scouted under my orders 
by a detachment from the Eighth U. S. Colored Troops. All that part 
of Nassau County is free from rebels. I have not yet received the 
detailed report. A second party is to-day scouring the neck of land 
lying this side of Doctor's Lake and between McGirt's Creek and 
the Saint John's. They are in search of a torpedo party said to 
have landed there. 

Your obedient servant, 

WM. BIRNEY, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



HEA'bQUARTERS DISTRICT OF FLORIDA, 

June 8, 1864. 
Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Assistant Adjutant-General: 
Captain : It is important that there should be prompt and con- 
stant communication between this point and Saint Augustine and 
Picolata. The usual means employed in the army is the telegraph. 
It will require about 60 miles of telegraphic wire. I respectfully 
request that Captain Sheldon, or, in -his absence, some one ac- 
quainted with the business, be ordered to report to me with the 
necessary materials for building the same. About 10 miles extra 
wire and some tap batteries should be added. This telegraph line 
I consider essential to the prompt concentration of the troops in 
Florida. 

Very truly, your obedient servant, 

WM. BIRNEY, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 

[First indorsement.] 

Headquarters Department of the South,- 

Hilton Head, June 14, 1864. 

Respectfully referred to Captain Sheldon, superintendent military 
telegraph. Department of the South, for report. 
These papers to be returned. 
By command of Mai. Gen. J. G. Foster : 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



122 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

[Second indorsement.] 

Office of U. S. Military Telegraph, 

Hilton Head, June 14, 18G4. 
It is impossible to supply operators for the -within proposed tele- 
graph -without closing offices now in operation in this department. 
The cost of material -would be about $2,200 for 65 miles. The ma- 
terial could be forwarded from this post, and the line erected at 
once. No dependence can be placed upon the line unless it should 
be protected along its whole length from injury by guerrillas. It is 
certain that if the enemy meditated movements which would require 
the concentration of our forces, his first attempt would be to cripple 
the telegraph if possible, and thus defeat the main object for which 
the line is required. 
Respectfully submitted.' 

L. F. SHELDON, 
Capt. , Asst. Quartermaster and Inspector of Telegraph. 

[Third indorsement.] 

June 16, 1864. 
Respectfully referred back to Brigadier-General Birney, for infor- 
mation as to tlie protection he can give the line if built. 

If General Birney is satisfied upon this point, the material, &c., 
will be furnislied by Captain Sheldon from these headquarters.' 
The line, however, cannot be erected until operators can be obtained 
to work it. 

J. G. FOSTER. 

[Fourth indorsement.] 

Headquarters District of Florida, 

June 20, 1864, 

Respectfully returned. 

Operators can be siipplied from the enlisted men now in this dis- 
trict. The line runs through a part of the country entirely ours. I 
traverse it without a guard ; single men and officers pass between 
this and Saint Augustine without apprehension. A loyal popula- 
tion is rapidly settling on the east side of the Saint John's. These 
men would promptly arrest any one from the rebel army. Our 
picket-boats and the gun-boats on the river make it a difficult mat- 
ter for any to pass from the west to the east side of the Saint John's. 
On the whole, I consider the line as safe certainly as the one between 
New York and Philadelphia. 

The aid of such a communication would be immense to the general 
commanding district in the ordinary administration. If the line 
cost $20,000 it should be made. 

WM. BIRNEY, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department op the South. 

Hilton Head, S. C, June 9, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. John P. Hatch, 

Comdg. District of Hilton Head, Hilton, Head, S. C. : 
I am instructed by the major-general commanding to inform you 
that the camp of instruction for colored troops will be formed at 



Chip. XLVn.] COEEESPONDEKCE, ETC. — UNION. 123 

Beaufort, and that the One hundred and forty-fourth and One hun- 
dred and iifty-seventh New York Volunteers have been ordered to 
report to you for duty. He also directs that the proper arrange- 
ments be made for their encampment. 
I have the honor to be, most respectfully, your obedient servant. 

THOMAS J. ROBINSON, 
First Lieut, 21st U. S. Colored Troops, A. A. A. O. 



Hdqrs. District of Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., June 9, 1864. 

Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Assistant Adjutant-General : 

» 

Captain : Well-informed officers of the navy tell me that the 
rebel steamer Saint Mary's, sunk 5 miles from here, can easily be 
raised with the aid of a centrifugal pump, such as can be had on 
any iron-clad. If you will direct your chief quartermaster to send 
me §uch a pump, I will have an effort made to raise her. -A few 
wreckers with their apparatus and machinery can raise all that is 
valuable in the Maple Leaf, the General Hunter, and the Harriet 
A. Weed. Are there not some at Charleston ? 
Your obedient servant, 

WM. BIRNEY, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. District of Florida, Dept. op the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., June 9, 1864. 
Commanding Officer op Confederate Forces : 

Sir : In the recent capture of the Columbine on the Saint John's 
River by a part of the forces imder your command a number of offi- 
cers and enlisted men in the service of the United States became, I 
am informed and believe, your prisoners of war. A few enlisted 
men were killed and others wounded. The relatives, friends, and 
comrades of the men in that unfortunate vessel are anxious to know 
their fate. I will promptly communicate to them such information 
as you may think proper to give. 

I have the honor to transmit herewith a package of open letters 
for parties residing within the Confederate lines. 
Your obedient servant, 

WM. BIRNEY, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



General Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department of the South, 

No. 84. ) Hiltxm Head, S. C, June 10, 18G4. 

I. The services of Col. P. P. Bxown, jr. , One hundred and fifty- 
seventh New York Volunteers, being required with his regiment, 
he is hereby relieved from the duties of provost-marshal-general of 
this department, and mil join his regiment without delay. 



124 S. C, FLA,, AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVH. 

' II. Lieut. Col. James F. Hall, First New York Volunteer En- 
gineers, is detailed as pi-ovost-marshal-general of the department, 
and will be obeyed and respected accordingly. 

III. Paragraph 3, General Orders, No. 47, current series, from 
these headquarters, is hereby revoked.* 
By command of Mai. Gen. J. G. Foster : 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant-Oeneral. 



Washington, June 11, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Comdg. Department of the South, Hilton Head, S. C. : 

General : Your notes of the 7th instant, marked private, are 
just received. I have no opportunity to communicate with General 
Grant with regard to fheir contents, as the telegraph line is not in 
operation to his headquarters, but will give you his views as I under- 
stand them. 

In directing General Gillmore to bring to Fortress Moni-oe all 
troops in his department not required to hold our positions there on 
the defensive. General Grant did not intend that no demonstrations 
or attacks should be made against the enemy which the command- 
ing general should deem feasible. He will expect you to employ 
your troops in the way you may deem most advantageous. It is 
proper to remark in this connection that General Gillmore has 
recently reported that he left more troops in the Department of the 
South than he deemed absolutely necessary for a simple defense, 
and that he has evidence that a greater portion of Beaiiregard's 
forces are now in front of Richmond. He therefore recommends 
that, if no offensive operations are intended there, at least 5,000 men 
can be spared from your department. This recommendation was 
submitted to General Grant, but no action on it has been taken by 
him. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. W. HALLECK, 
Major- General and Chief of Staff. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

June 11, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff, Armies of the United States : 
General : I have the honor to inclose you copy of communiCa- 
tionf received this day from Col. William A. Howard, commanding 
Thirteenth Regiment New York Volunteer Artillery, and would re- 
spectfully suggest that this regiment, with the boats referred to, be 
ordered to this department. Colonel Howard has served with me in 
North Carolina, and it was on my suggestions that the boats were 
built. They can be of great service in this department, being par- 
ticularly adapted to these waters, as they are of light draught, and 
can navigate the internal passages from Morris Island to Florida. 
There are other reasons why I think the service would be benefited 

•The revoked paragraph constituted a Board " to heaf appeals from persons held 
responsible by Boards of Survey for loss or damage to public property." 
f Not found. 



Chap. XLVU.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 125 

by having these boats here, viz : First. They will answer for the 
purposes of transportation. Second. They can be used for landing 
troops, owing to their extreme light draught, being able to run 
quite up to the shore, and allowing the troops to disembark with- 
out employing surf -boats or bateaux. Third. They will be service- 
able as fighting boats, as their sides are protected by bullet-proof 
iron plating, and are furnished with proper accommodations and ar- 
rangements for guns. 

Should it be deemed inadvisable to order the regiment with all 
the boats here, I tx'ust you will be able to send me the two boats now 
nearly ready for sea in New York, with a battalion of the regiment. 
I am particulai-ly anxious to have these boats ordered here, as this 
department was in a great measure stripped of steamers by General 
Gillmore for the transportation of the Tenth Army Corps from this 
place. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, June U, 1864. 

Rear-Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron : 
Admiral : I have the honor to transmit herewith a certified copy 
of a letter from Brig. Gen. Joiin P. Hatch, commanding District of 
Hilton Head, &c. , giving particulars in regard to the information 
obtained from deserters from the rebel lines as far as relates to the 
Water Witch. I respectfully solicit your attention to General 
Hatch's request for a naval force in Calibogue Sound. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfullv, your obedient servant, 

■ J. G. FOSTER, 
3Iajor- General, Commanding. 

[Inclosure.] 

Headquarters District Hilton Head, &c., 

Hilton Head, June 11, 1864. 
Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Assistant Adjutant- General : 
Captain : An examination made by myself of the deserters from 
Savannah elicited the following important fact : The rebels are en- 
gaged in taking out the guns of the Water Witch for the purpose of 
lightening her suflaciently to enable her to pass through ThunderboHi 
Creek into the Savannah River. I would again cM the attention of 
the major-general commanding to the danger of an attack from the 
combined naval force of the enemy upon the southern end of Hilton 
Head Island, unless an ample naval force is kept in Calibogue 
Sound. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 

P. S. — There is in Savannah a steam-ship built since the war, com- 
pletely fitted for sea, called No. 10, supposed to be intended for a 
blockade-runner. 



126 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVU. 

Hbaimjuarters Department op the South, 

HUion Head, 8. C, June 11, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. A. Schimmelpennig, 

Comdg. North. Dist., Dept. of the South, Folly Island, S. C: 

I am instructed by the major-general commanding to acknowledge 

the receipt of your communication of the 10th instant,* and to state 

that your orders for placing the booms inStono River are approved. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 

servant, 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Hdqes. Northeen District, Dept. op the South, 

FoUy Island, S. C, June 11, 1864. 
Col. William Heine, 

Commanding Post : 

I am instructed by the general commanding to state that Captain 

McKenna has received orders to construct a boom across from the 

jjiles in the Stouo River to the Cole's Island shore, and to direct that 

you furnish Captain McKenna with facilities to aid in this work. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. B. DEAN, 
Lieutenant, 127^/t New York Volunteers, A. A. A. G. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, June 13, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff, Armies of the U. S., Washington, D. C. : 
General : I have the honor to transmit herewith, for your infor- 
mation, a copy of a letter received from Rear-Admiral J. A. Dahl- 
gren.. commanding South Atlantic- Blockade Squadron, showing 
that since the capture of the Water Witch the weakness of the 
squadron has caused the admiral to withdraw from the inside block- 
ade of many of the sounds and rivers in the department. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 

[InclQsure.] 

Flag-Steamer Philadelphia, 
Off Morris Island, S. C, June 10, 1864. ; 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Hdqrs. Hilton Head: 
General : I received yours of the 8th instant, inclosing copy of a 
note from General Hatch. It would give me pleasure to comply 
with his suggestions, but the reduced number of vessels in the 
squadron prevent me from efficiently blocijading existing stations, 
and will compel me to withdraw from some of them unless speedily 
re-enforced. All the vessels of the squadron are very short-handed, 

*See Part I, p. 63. 



Chap. XLVD.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 127 

and some of them even more so than the Water Witch, which natu- 
rally occasions their withdrawal from the inside blockade until my 
force is sufficiently strong to enable me to. resume it. I'he squadron 
is now short of vessels, short of men, and almost entirely out of coal. 
Until I am able to put a vessel in the Calibogue, I would suggest 
that a small battery be placed there which would effectually stop 
the Water Witch from going thixjugh. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

, J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Bear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Flag-Steamer Philadelphia, 
Off Morris Island, S. C, June 13, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Hdqrs. Hilton Head : 

General : Yours of the 11th instant is just received, in regard to 
the possibility of an attack by the rebels with the Water Witch on 
the southern end of Hilton Head Island, and a suggestion that I 
would place a vessel in Calibogue Sound. The schooner Ward is 
now lying in the channel leading in that direction, and can be placed 
wherever it is most desired to prevent the attack that General Hatch 
api:)rehends. The battery of the Ward consists of four long 32- 
pounders, which is very much heavier than anything the Water 
Witch carries. If this vessel is supported by a battery on the south 
end of Hilton Head Island, the Water Witch will hardly venture an 
attack. This battery might consist of two or three 9-inch guns, 
which I will have placed there if it is convenient for you to have 
breast-works thrown up and platforms laid. The steamer Harvest 
Moon, which lies near Tybee, would soon participate in the defense 
when it became necessary. The chief danger of the vessels in Tybee 
will be from boarding, as they are deficient in the number of the 
crew. I would suggest, therefore, that a company of veteran sol- 
diers be ordered to report to the commanding officers of the vessels 
every night for duty. I wish very much it was in my power to place 
more suitable vessels there, but I have already apprised you, under 
date of the lOtli, that the force under my command is so much re- 
duced in the number of vessels and of men that it will be a matter 
of great difficulty with me to retain vessels at their present stations. 
As soon as the deficiencies in these respects shall be made uj) from 
the North, I will place such a force near Calibogue as will prevent 
any attempt by the Water Witch. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Bear-Admiral, Comdg. Soidh Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[First indorsement.! 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

June 15, 1864. 

Respectfully referred to Brigadier-General Hatch, commanding 
District of Hilton Head, &c., calling his attention to the suggestions 
of the admiral, on which he will report. 
By order of General Foster : .. 

J. F. ANDERSON, 
Major, Aide-de-Camp. 



128 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. tCiUP. XLVU. 

[Second indorsement.] 

Headquarters Hilton Head District, 

Hilton Head, S. C, June 16, 1864, 
Respectfully returned to Department of tlie South headquarters. 
At the time mjr letter was addressed to the general commanding, 
I was under the impression that the Water Witch was a large vessel 
with a powerful armament. Since I have learned her class and arm- 
ament I do not apprehend any danger from her. With the battery 
to be manned with the colored artillery, I do not anticipate any 
trouble. 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier- General of Volunteers, Comdg. District. 

[Third indorsement.] 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

June 17, 1864. 

Respectfully returned to Brigadier-General Hatch, commanding 
District of Hilton Head, &c. , with a request that he report, for the 
information of the commanding general, if it is practicable to supply 
from the army details for the purpose of supplying the. deficiency in 
the crew of the navy boats, for the protection of the inland waters 
of this district, as suggested by the admiral within. 
By order of General Foster : 

J. F. ANDERSON, 
Major and Aide-de-Camp. 

[Fourth indorsement.) 

Headquarters Hilton Head District, 

Hilton Head, S. C, June 17, 1864. 
Respectfully returned to headquarters Department of the South. 
At the present time I do not see how a company can be well spared 
for the guard of the vessels of war in Tybee Roads. 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier-General of Volunteers, Comdg. District. 



Headquarters District of Florida, 

June 13, 1864. 
Maj. Augustus Vignos, 

Oommanding One hundred and seventh Ohio: 

Major : You will proceed with the six companies of your com- 
mand to Fernandina, where you will relieve the One hundred and 
fifty-seventh Regiment New York Volunteers. The following are 
your instructions : 

You will make your own headquarters at Fort Clinch. You will j 
keep a small picket, relieved semi-weekly, at the usual place near"" 
the crossing of the railroad bridge over the Amelia River, shifting 
frequently its position. You will keep a picket of one company at 
the town of Fernandina. This also will be relieved semi-weekly. 
If other small pickets should be needed for the purpose of guarding 
the prisoners, you will station them. The rest of the island you will 
scout frequently with a mounted jjatrol. Your first duty will be to 
guard the prisoners at Fort €!linch. You will see that the prisoners 
are properly confined at night inside the fort, and in the places pro- 
vided for that purpose, and are properly guarded at their labor dur- 



Chap. XLVH.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION, 129 

ing the day, and made fully to perform it. The work will be exe- 
cuted as required by the engineer officer who may be in charge. 
You will see that the records of the prisoners are fully and properly 
kept. You will yourself act as provost-marshal and report as such 
to the district provost-marshal on my staff. Your regimental quar- 
termaster will act as commissary. You will see to it that refugees; 
contrabands, and all civilians whatsoever, asking subsistence from 
the Government, shall be forwarded to Jacksonville. You will fur- 
nish subsistence to them only for the time necessary to forward them 
to this point, except in cases of sickness or other cases of extreme 
necessity, of all which you will make immediate report to these 
headquarters. Your regimental quartermaster, acting as post com- 
missary, will be held strictly responsible, as will you yourself, for 
issuing rations to civilians in any other manner than as provided for 
in the circular issued by the chief commissary of subsistence of the 
department. You will endeavor to ascertain the rebel force between 
Nassau River and Saint Mary's River, sending out scouts if necessary 
for that purpose. You will keep the men of your command thor- 
oughly drilled in the manual and in company movements, and also in 
heavy artillery drill. You will report to these headquarters whether 
you need a special instructor for that purpose. You will not permit 
any officer or enlisted man of the One hundred and fifty-seventh 
New York Volunteers to take away with him any public horse or 
any captured or abandoned property, especially furniture, but you 
will see that all captured or abandoned property is duly handed over 
to the agent of the Treasu]*y Department, and you will give him 
every facility for keeping said property, or transporting it to this 
place or to Hilton Head. Your tri-monthly reports will be made 
out on the 5th, 15th, and 25th of «ach month, and forwarded on the 
first opportunity to these headquarters. You will cause your men to 
practice in boat rowing, and you are hereby authorized to send, after 
you have fully scouted Nassau County, an occasional boat party by 
the inland passage to the Saint John's River as far as Saint John's 
Bluff. You will report frequently to these headquarters, sending 
especially full reports of deserters' statements. You will cause to 
be repaired fully, if practicable, the old wharf near Fort Clinch, and 
if not practicable, you will build a new one. Cultivate friendly 
relations with naval officers. 

These instructions are given you by order of Brig. Gen. WiUiam 
Birney. 

M. BAILEY, 
Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Special Orders, ) War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 206. ) Washington, June 13, 1864. 

I. Surg. Ebenezer Swift, U. S. Army, is hereby relieved from 
duty in the Department of the South, and will report in person, 
without delay, to the commanding general Department of the 
Northwest, to relieve Surg. Thomas M. Getty, U. S. Army, as med- 
ical director. 

Bv order of the Secretary of War : 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 

9 R R— VOL XXXV, PT II 



130 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVII. 

Headquarters District of Pensacola, 

Barrancas, June 14, 1864. 
Maj. John Levering, 

Asst. Adjt. Oen. , Hdqrs. Defenses of New Orleans : 
Major : I have the honor to submit, in connection with my report 
of June 3, No. 403, the following additional Information in regard 
to affairs in my neighborhood received from refugees and deserters : 
The garrison at Fort Morgan does not exceed 600 men. There 
are two companies of cavalry at Camp Withers, two companies at 
Camp Andover, guarding the salt-works, and one company at Camp 
Powell, near the Perdido. The general impression is that the rebel 
rams will not attack the blockading squadron but content them- 
selves with defending the harbor of Mobile. At and near Milton 
there are three companies of cavalry, about 100 men in all. In the 
Blackwater River the rebels have been placing torpedoes at different 
places between Milton and Pierce's Point. Colonel Maury is still 
above Pensacola, at the Seven and Fifteen Mile Stations, with six 
companies of cavalry and three pieces of artillery. 

Mobile papers of the 10th instant place General Grant at Mechan- 
icsville. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ASBOTH, 
Brigadier- General. 

Headquarters Depar'^ment of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, June 15, 1864. 
General H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff r . 

General: I am getting things into shape as fast as possible. 
The school of instruction for colored troops is being started at Beau- 
fort, as being better than this place, and I have got the officers inter- 
ested in the matter of perfection of drill, &c. At the end of two or 
three months, at the farthest, I will have these colored regiments so 
set up that they can be taken into battle with confidence. 

In consequence of the large amount of transportation, extra stores, 
engineer and quartermaster material, pontoons, boats, extra horses, 
arms, &c., taken away by General Gillmore the department is left 
nearly stripped of many useful and necessary things. One light 
battery and a portion of the cavalry are without horses ; boats and 
pontoons are wanting, together with a sufficient number of vessels 
for operations inside, as well as for the transfer of troops on the out- 
side, from one point to another of the department. I trust you will 
not think me complaining, for I only wish to give you an inside 
view of matters for your private information. I shall endeavor to 
make the best use of the means at my disposal, and hope to be able, 
after due preparation, to give a good account of ourselves. 

I am not so sanguine as I was a week ago about effecting any 
great success in an extended demonstration. I have learned more 
of the character of the troops left here (General Gillmore, of course, 
took the best with him), and find that much discipline and drill is 
required. I am, however, getting ready for any small operations 
that may offer, and am watching for an opportunity to make a dash 
on Fort Johnson. I am in hopes of effecting a surprise. I could 
take Fort Sumter if it was required, but this will involve some loss, 
and for it boats and ladders must be provided. 



Chap. XLVn.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 131 

If the force was large enough to run the risk I could land in the 
rear of Mount Pleasant, and take tljat place, but the position cannot 
be held unless the force be large enough to guard its flanks from 
troops thrown over from Charleston or collected and thrown into 
its rear by crossing the Wando higher up, or unless the irou-clads 
he moved into Wando River to hold it. I have proposed this last 
operation to the admiral, but I do not think he will undertake it at 
present. This force is much weakened. In addition to the depart- 
ure of th*e New Ironsides, one or two monitors are undergoing 
repairs. Several gun-boats are away for the same purpose ; the 
Water Witch is captured, and one or two boats destroyed in Florida. 
This has forced the admiral to withdraw his vessels from the inside 
blockade of the waters between Fort Pulaski and Fernandina until 
his force of vessels is increased. 

I inclose a file of rebel papers. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully and truly, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, • 

Folly Island, 8. C, June 15, 1864. 
Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of the South: 

Captain : I have the honor to report that yesterday evening I 
received, by flag of truce, a letter from General Jones to the 
major-general commanding department, a letter from General Rip- 
ley to myself, which I respectfully annex, and several private letters 
by the same means. My only answer to General Ripley, until orders 
from the major-general commanding are received, has been and 
will be a continuation of the usual fire on the city, with a constant 
change of direction, to avoid, if possible, the design of the enemy to 
bring their prisoners under our fire. 

Tlie officer who received the flag of truce reports to me that the 
Confederate officers, in order to get an immediate answer, stated 
they would wait, knowing General Foster to be present in the dis- 
trict. 

Charieston must be considered a place "of arms." It contains a 
large arsenal, military foundries, &:c., and has already furnished 
three iron-clads to the enemy. It is our duty to destroy these 
resources. In reference to the women and children of the bom- 
barded city, I therefore can only say the same situation occurs 
wherever a weak and strong party are at war, and the practice of 
exposing prisoners of war to the fire of the attacking force is as old 
as the fact that weak and wicked parties must fall under the blows 
of justice. I may be allowed here to state that the act which the 
enemy has now committed he has threatened ever since the first 
shell exploded in the city, over nine months ago, and it is therefore 
fair to suppose some special reason now exists for the fulfillment of 
his threat, although I can find no reason other than his desperate 
situation. In my opinion the endeavor of the enemy to force us to 
give up the bombardment should be the reason for its contimiation. 
At the same time, as a means to force him to give up his barbarous 

Eractices, the simple fact of retaliation can be made effectual, as I 
ave as many places where his shells fall as he has in Charleston 
where mine fall. I also tliink that the United States can furnish as 



132 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Caip. XLVII. 

large a number of Confederate generals and field officers as they can 
procure of ours. From the fact of the enemy's being so anxious 
for an immediate reply I am led to believe the whole thing a ruse, 
or at least only a threat not yet carried out. 
I am, general, very respectfully, 

A, SCHIMMELFENNIG, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding District. 

[Inclosure.] • 

Headquarters First Military District, 
Dept. op South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 

Charleston, June 13, 1864. 
General Schimmelfennig, 

Comdg. U. S. Forces, Morris and Folly Islands, &c. : 
General : I have the honor to inclose, for transmission to the com- 
manding general of the U. S. forces on this coast, a letter from 
Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, commanding this department. 

The letter informs him that 5 generals and 45 field officers of the 
Federal army, prisoners, have been ordered to be confined in 
Charleston. These officers have been placed under my charge, and 
will be provided with commodious quarters, in a part of the city 
occupied by non-combatants, the majority of whom are women and 
children. 

It is proper that you should know, however, that the portion of the 
city in which they are located is, and has been for some time, ex- 
posed day and night to the fire of your guns. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

R. S. RIPLEY, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 

[Sub-inclosiire.] 

Hdqrs. Dept. of S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 

Charleston, S. C, June 13, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Comdg. U. S. Forces on coast of South Carolina, C. S. : 
General : Five generals and 45 field officers of the U. S. Army, 
all of them prisoners of war, have been sent to this city for safe- 
keeping. They have been turned over to Brigadier- General Ripley, 
commanding the First Military District of this department, who will 
see that they are provided with commodious q^uarters in a part of 
the city occupied by non-combatants, the majority of whom are 
women and children. It is proper, however, that I should inform 
you that it is a part of the city which has been for many months 
exposed day and night to the fire of your guns. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

SAM. JONES, 
Major-General, Commanding.'" 



Private.] Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, June 15, 1864. 
Brigadier-General Birney, 

Commanding District of Florida : 
General : I am led to believe, from all the information I have 
received, that the force in Florida opposed to yoii is very small. If 
this be so, you will b^ able to make a movement past Baldwin and 



Chap. XLVni CORRESPONBENCE, ETC. — UNION. 133 

burn the trestle-work on the railroad which General Seymour neg- 
lected to burn on his retreat from Olustee. I expect you to make 
any movement of this kind promising success with little risks that 
you are able to make with your present force. The two regiments 
now withdrawn are required here for immediate work. I trust 
you may succeed in enlisting a Florida regiment. You must obtain 
what horses you can in your district, for it is almost impossible to 

fet them from the North. I will reply to your letter of the 8th of 
une by the present mail officially. 

The object of removing the main body of the regiment stationed 
on Amelia Island from Fernandina to Fort Clinch is twofold, viz, 
to secure the fort and guard the prisoners, and to remove the offi- 
cers and men from the town, where they are sure to become demor- 
alized, in a greater or less degree. A strong guard, not to exceed 
two companies, may be stationed in the fort at Fernandina, to guard 
the hospital, coal-yard, &c., provided you judge it advisable. I pro- 
pose to have a small jteamer run from Morris and Folly Islands to 
and from Saint Augustine, to bring vegetables, fruits, &c., for the 
use of the regiments in the Northern District. The steamer doing 
this may also be able to take supplies from this place to Florida, 
touching at Fernandina and Jacksonville on her way to Saint Au- 
gustine, provided you see she is not detained at either of the above 
places, nor at Saint Augustine, longer than is necessary for the com- 
missary on board to lay in his supplies of vegetables, &c. 

The New York Herald of the 10th, a single copy of which is 
received here, [contains] nothing of interest, except the nomination 
of President Lincoln for President, and Governor Johnson, of Ten- 
nessee, for Vice-President. General Hunter has achieved a victory 
over the rebels near Staunton. 

J. G. FOSTER. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, June 15, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. William Birney, Comdg. Dist. of Florida : 

General : General Foster is in receipt of your favor of the 8th 
instant, concerning the letter of instructions of the 6th of June, and 
directs me to write you as follows, viz : 

He approves of your selection of the cavalry camp to cover Saint 
Augustine. You will hold Picolata with such a force as in your" 
judgment is required. The object of ordering a small permanent 
[guard] in Fernandina was to get the troops out of the town. You 
will retain in Fernandina a proper garrison, but the main body of 
the troops must be encamped some distance from the town. 

Colonel Littlefield has been ordered to take charge of recruiting, 
mustering in, &c. , of the Florida volunteers, and will report to you 
in a few days for that purpose. The whole of the One hundred 
and fifty-seventh Regiment will be ordered here. Concerning the 
detailed men of the One hundred and forty-fourth Regiment, you 
are respectfully referred to General Orders, No; 68, from these 
headquarters, which must be complied with. In future the quar- 
termaster will see that you are supplied with a proper amount of 
forage. - ^ 

I have the honor to be, general, your obedient servant, 

J. F. ANDERSON, 
Major and Aide-de-Camp. 



134 s. a, FiA., akd on the ga. coast. tCHip. nmt. 

Headqjcaetees Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, June 16, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, 

Comdg. Confederate Forces, Dept. S. C, Ga., and Fla. : 

General : I have the honor to request that flags of truce covering 
official communications may be instructed to meet our pickets at 
Port Royal Ferry, at which point only is it convenient to receive 
them. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, £. C, June 16, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, 

Comdg. Confederate Forces, Dept. of S. C, Ga., and Fla.: 

General : I have to acknowledge the receipt this day of your 
communication of the 13th instant, informing me that 5 generals 
and 45 field officers of the U. S. Army, prisoners of war, have been 
sent to Charleston for safe-keeping; that they have been turned 
over by you to Brigadier-General Ripley, with instructions to see 
that they are provided with quarters in a part of the city occupied 
by non-combatants, the majority of which latter, you state, are 
womeu and children. You add that you deem it proper to inform 
me that it is a part of the city which has been for many months 
exposed to the fire of our guns. 

Many months since Major-General Gillmore, U. S. Army, notified 
General Beauregard, then commanding at Charleston, that the city 
would be bombarded. This notice was given that non-combatants 
might be remdved and thus women and children be spared from 
harm. General Beauregard, in a communication to General Gill- 
more, dated August 23, 1863, informed him that the non-combatant 
population of Charleston would be removed with all possible celer- 
ity. That women and children have been since retained by you 
in a part of the city which has been for many months exposed to 
fire IS a matter decided by your own sense of humanity. I must, 
however, protest against your action in thus placing defenseless 
prisoners of war in a position exposed to constant bombardment. 
It is an indefensible act of cruelty, and can be designed only to 
prevent the continuance of our fire upon Charleston. That city is 
a depot for military supplies. It contains not merely arsenals but 
also foundries and factories for the manufacture of munition*.of 
war. In its ship-yards several armed iron-clads have already been 
completed, while others are still upon the stocks in course of con- 
struction. Its wharves and the banks of the rivers on both sides of 
the city are lined with batteries. To destroy these means of con- 
tinuing the war is therefore our object and duty. You seek to 
defeat this effort, not by means known to honorable warfare; but 
by placing unarmed and helpless prisoners under our fire. 

I have forwarded your communication to the President, with the 
request that he will place in my custody an equal number of 



Chap. XLVn.] C0RRE8P0NDEKCE, ETC. — UNION. 185 

prisoners of the like grades, to be kept by me in positions exposed 
to the fire of your guns so long as you continue the course stated 
in your communication. 
1 have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commaniling. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, June 16, 1804. 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff : 
General : I have the honor to inclose herewith a copy of a letter* 
from Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, commanding the Confederate De- 
partment of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, dated June 1.3 
instaut, transmitted through Brig. Gen. R. S. Ripley, commanding 
the First Military District of such department, with copies of Gen- 
eral Ripley's letter of transmittal and of my reply.* I have sent 
Maj. E. N. Strong, of my personal staff, to Fortress Monroe, with 
the propeller Mary A. Boardman, with instructions to await your 
reply and to bring down the requisite number of prisoners to this 
department should the President accede to my recommendation that 
the means of retaliation indicated in my letter to General Jones be 
adopted. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-Oeneral, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, June 16, 1864. 

Rear- Admiral John A. Dahlgren, 

Comdg, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron : 

• Admiral : I have the honor to transmit herewith a communica- 
tion to the commander of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
from Lieut. Commander E. P. Williams, received by flag of truce 
from the enemy, f I avail myself of this opportunity to inclose a copy 
of a communication^ from Brigadier General Ripley, of the Confed- 
erate Army, and also a copy of my reportj to Major-General Foster, 
commanding the department. By the same flag of truce I received 
a Richmond paper of the 10th instant. Beyond the statement that 
General Grant had changed his base of operations from White 
House to the James River, and effected a junction with General 
Butler, it contained no news of importance. Some anxiety was felt 
in Richmond for the safety of Petersburg, that city having been 
entered by our cavalry, who were afterward driven out. 

An Augusta paper of the 9th instant contained no news of interest 
in regard to General Sherman's movements. I should be very much 

*See pp. 133, 134. 

t For Williams' letter, see p. 352 of 'Annual Report of Secretary of the Navy, 
December 5, 1864. 
tSee pp. 131,132. 



136 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

obliged if you would permit me to retain the deserters who were 
sent from the fleet on shore for the present. They will be kept on 
Morris Island subject to your orders. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant , 

A. SCHfMMELFENNIG, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding District. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, June 16, 1864. 

Capt. C. P. McKenna, 

Chief Engineer, Northern Dist., Dept. of the South : 
The general commanding wishes you to hurry the work on the 
boom across the Stono as much as possible. If the plan proposed 
will require too much time, he wishes you to adopt some other means 
of accomplishing the object, which is to have passage of the river 
closed up at once. 

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. B. DEAN, 
Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters District op Florida, 

Jacksonville, Fla., June 16, 1864. 

Commanding Officer of Confederate Forces in Florida : 

Sir : At 4 o'clock this p. m., it was reported to me that a cavalry 
lieutenant liad ridden out of the lines with 2 privates on King's 
road, and had not returned. I gave them up as captured or lost. 
At 8 o'clock this evening the lieutenant has returned, stating that 
he went out with a flag of truce to carry a letter. His act, though 
done in good faith, was wholly unauthorized by me and unknown to 
me until his return. It was the act of an ignorant and inexperi- 
enced second lieutenant under advice of a first of the' same charac- 
ter. Neither of them had ever been on duty before on this line, or 
connected with a flag of truce. 

The occasion of his going was to bear a letter written by me to 
Mrs. Jones and Mrs. McCormick in answer to an affecting appeal 
from them to give them aid in searching for the bodies of Mrs. Price 
and her child. I have the honor to inclose their letter. * You will 
see from it that they were waiting for my answer at my outer pickets. 
I intended my letter to be handed them there. Nothing was said 
about a flag of truce, but this young officer assumed that one was 
necessary in the circumstances. Accept my assurance of sincere^ 
regret for this occurrence, and that I shall take measures to prevent"" 
its repetition. 

Although this letter is designed for Major -General Anderson, I 
send it open, as I wish this explanation to be known at once to the 
Confederate officer in command of Cedar Creek outposts. 
Your obedient servant, 

WM. BIRNEY, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 

*Not found. 



Chap. XLyu.] COERESPONDENOE, ETC. — UNION. ' 137 

Private.] Headquarters Department of the. South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, June 17, 1864. 
Brigadier-General Birney, 

Commanding District of Florida: 
General : I wrote you a private letter a few days since about 
making an effort to destroy the trestle-work on the railroad west of 
Baldwin. My information is to the effect that the enemy's force in 
Florida is very small and mainly militia. I trust you will under- 
take the operation if, in your judgment, the chances are in favor 
of success. The plan must be formed by yourself. I would only 
suggest that you make the movement past Baldwin, destroying the 
trestle-work, and then either turn on Baldwin and take it, or take a 
little [sic], whichever promises most success. I wish you also to 
give great attention to the drill and discipline of the colored regi- 
ments. They should be practiced in the firing, both blank and with 
the ball at a target. Incompetent officers must be eliminated. 

The rebel General Samuel Jones, commanding on the other side, 
has placed 5 general officers and 45 field officers, U. S. prisoners of 
war, in Charleston under our fire. I have sent to Fort Monroe to 
get an equal number of rebels to expose to their fire. No further 
news. 

Respectfully, &c., 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Mnjor-General, Commanding. 



Flag-Steamer Philadelphia, 
Off Morris Island, S. C, June 17, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Com,manding Department of the South: 
General : My attention has been drawn to the inclosed article,* 
purporting to have been written by a correspondent in Hilton Head. 
It is asserted therein that the only person who escaped from the 
Water Witch gives information that not a shot was fired in defense. 
Now, the fact is that the person alluded to makes no such statement, 
but just the reverse. He says that there was hard fighting for half 
an hour, and that he noticed the captain (Pendergrast) three times 
on the quarter-deck encouraging his men, who were fighting briskly. 
He also says that the rebels came in on all sides. It was also known 
that the Savannah papers admitted a loss of 7 men killed and 12 
wounded. The same article is equally wide of the truth in stating 
that the Water Witch was 1,300 tons and carried three 100-pounders 
and three 12-pounders, and was one of the fleetest and most valua- 
ble vessels for blockade in the squadron. The Water Witch was a 
small steamer of 378 tons and carried only one 30-pounder and three 
12-pounders, such as are used in boats. Her full crew only amounted 
to 82 men, and of this small number she was 14 men short when 
taken, which would not have been the case if the quota of men ex- 
pected from the troops of this department had been supplied ; 
whereas not a man was received until you took command, and now 
only-50 to this date, which will not begin to fill deficiencies. She 
iras a convenient vessel on account of her draught, being less than 10 

* Not found. 



138 • S. C, PLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. IChap. XLVU. 

feet, but it is absurd to speak of her as a fast or valuable vessel. 
She was of moderate speed, probably not 9 knots, and was only of 
account in comparison with other vessels that have no steam. . Her 
trifling armament and number of men gave her little importance. 

Whatever want of vigilance may have existed, all the information 
we have goes to show that it was redeemed by a sharp resistance 
against superior numbers. The official rebel report which has 
reached here states that the fighting was hard. 

I hope that the writer of the notice may be called to account for 
these statements. They are untrue and unjust to the character of 
the commander, officers, and crew of the Water Witch, who, being 
prisoners, are unable to say anything in their own behalf , coming, 
too, from persons within the military jurisdiction, they so far receive 
sanction as to engender ill feelings between tlie two services. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic blockading Squadron. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, June 17, 1864. 
Capt. T. A. P. Champlin, 

Chief Com. of Sub., Dept. of the South, Hilton Head, S. C. : 
By direction of the major-general commanding, I have the honor 
to transmit herewith an extract from a report of Lieut. Col. Peter 
Pineo, medical inspector, U. S. Army, for your information ; 

I have the honor to report, for the consideration of the major-general command- 
ing, that on ray recent tour of inspection in the Northern District I found evidence 
of a scorbutic taint among the colored troops. There had been no issue of potatoes 
for nearly a month, and the commissary informed me that the issue of fresh beef 
would be but once in ten days. 

Surgeons inform me that the colored troops eat largely of pork, and are quite 
agreed that it is injurious to the health. The free use of pork in hot vreather I am 
quite convinced is injurious. I would therefore respectfully suggest that half the 
usual ration of pork be issued to the soldiers of this department, and a large issue 
be substituted of rice, hominy, desiccated potatoes, desiccated mixed vegetables, 
curried cabbage, and pickles. A large use of vegetaljles and anti-scorbutics at this 
season is of the highest importance, and I would respectfully suggest that the com- 
pany fund be expended for such articles of diet as the surgeons of regiments shall 

advise. 

• 

I have the honor to be, captain, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

THOMAS J. ROBINSON, 
First Lieut., 21st U. S. Colored Troops, A. A. A. G. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, June 17, 1864. 
Bri^. Gen. A. Schimmelpennig, 

Comdg. Northern District, Dept. of the South: 
General : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
favor of the 15th instant, covering communications received by flag 
of truce. I am much obliged to you for the valuable suggestions 
contained in your letter. I have sent copies of General Jones' letter 
to Washington, D. C, by a member of my staff, requesting that an 



Chip, avil.) e6ftEESP6NDt)N0E, ETO. — tTNlON. 139 

equal number of rebel prisoners be sent me by the authorities to be 
exposed to the fire of the enemy. I have informed General Jones, 
commanding the rebel forces in South Carolina, that no more fiags 
of truce will be received except at Port Royal Ferry; so you will 
decline to have any communication with them in any part of your 
district. My impression is that many of the flags are sent simply 
for the purpose of obtaining information. 

Captain Gouraud, of my personal staff, is intrusted with this. He 
will go in charge of the flag of truce, accompanied by an officer of 
your staff. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, 8. C, June 17, 1864. 
Col. A. S. Hartwell, 

Comdg. Fifty-fifth Eegt. Massachusetts Volunteers : 
Colonel : General Foster is in receipt of your favor of the 13th 
instant, and directs me to inform you that after information he gave 
you of his intended action concerning the pay of your regiment, he 
considers the letter to the Secretary of War as ill-timed. You are 
well aware that Colonel Hallowell, of the Fiftv-fourth Regiment, has 
been sent North for the purpose of doing all that can be done in 
order to have your regiment and the other colored troops of this 
department receive the same compensation as is paid the white 
troops here. Your letter has been forwarded to the Secretary of 
War, with a report of what has been done in reference to their pay. 
The general commanding is afraid*that your letter shows an incli- 
nation to make trouble, or it at least appears that your course is not 
calculated to allay the existing difficulties. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. F. ANDERSON, 
Major and Aide-de-Camp. 



Headquarters District op West Florida, 

Barrancas, June 17, 1864. 
Maj. John Levering, 

Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Defenses of New Orleans: 
Major : I have the honor to report that, in consideration of the 
vigorous movements of General Shecman's army, the united opera- 
tions of Polk, Forrest, and Roddey on the Mobile and Ohio Railroad 
in Mississippi, and the consequent scarcity of rebel troops iii West 
Florida and Alabama, I deemed it proper to make all preparations 
for an advance with my small command into the interior, confi- 
dently hoping that arms, horses, and equipments for the First Florida 
Cavalry and battery, and land and water transportation for the in- 
fantry, will be sent from New Orleans, for which requisitions have 
been made and respectfully forwarded months ago. With the above 
view I directed the district quartermaster to have in readiness the 
required materials for repairing one of the wharves at Pensacola, 



140 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA, COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

and would respectfully request for orders to the superintendent of 
telegraphs to send to this place the necessary wire, fixtures, me- 
chanics, apparatus, and operators to establish a line of communi- 
cation with the advance and base of operations in connection with 
the existing rebel telegraph line along the Pensacola railroad. 
Should this application be favorably considered, I would also re- 

aiiest that Mr. Edgar B. McNain, who was taken prisoner while on 
uty at Union City, Ky., by the rebels, and, making his escape from 
the Confederate prison at Macon, Ga., arrived within my lines the 
15th instant, be ordered here as one of the operators, agreeable to 
his own desire. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ASBOTH, 
Brigadier- General. 



Hdqes. Northern District, Dept. op the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, June 18, 1864. 
Col. William Gurney, 

Commanding Pod, Morris Island, S. C. : 
Colonel : The general commanding directs that you instruct the 
officers on outpost duty to keep a close watch on the enemy, to ob- 
serve, first, whether they remove any of the guns from their works 
on James Island ; second, whether in the camps or additions to 
camps lately seen on James Island there is any smoke to be seen, 
particularly early in the morning, or men moving about, or any other 
signs of their being inhabited by troops. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, vour obedient servant, 

' W. B. DEAN, 
Lieut, 127th New York Volunteers, A. A. A. G. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. op the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, June 18, 1864. 
Col. William Heine, 

Commanding Post: 
The general commanding district directs that in future no com- 
munications be had with the rebels across the lines of this district, 
either by flag of truce or otherwise. If any flags of truce are sent 
out by the enemy they will be immediately ordered back, and if the 
order is not at once complied with, two shots will be fired in the 
air as a warning and the third at the bearer of the flag, if he does not 
retire at once to his own lines. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. B. DEAN, 
Lieut., 127th New York Volunteers, A. A. A. G. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, June 18, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. E. Saxton, 

Comdg. District of Beaufort, Beaufort, S. C. : 
General : I am directed by the major-generalcommanding to in- 
form you that he has written Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, commanding 
the Confederate forces in this State, informing him that he will re- 



Chap. XtVII.l COREESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 141 

ceive no more flags of truce within the Northern District, and request- 
ing him to send any communications he may wish to reach these 
headquarters via Port Royal Ferry. You will therefore have one 
officer always in readiness to meet their officers should they at any 
time desire to communicate with these headquarters. 
, I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

J. F. ANDERSON, 
Major and Aide-de-Camp.' 



Fortress Monroe, Va., June 19, 1864—11.30 p. m. 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Washiiigton, D. C. : 
I am directed by Major-General Foster to forward to you the fol- 
lowing dispatch : 

Headquarters Department of the South, 
Hilton Head, S. C, June 16, 1864. (Via Fort Monroe, 11.30 p. m., 19th.) 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Washington, D. C. : 
1 have tlie honor to report that I have to-day received from Maj. Gten. Samuel 
Jones, coniniandins the rebel forces in this department, a letter stating that 5 gen- 
eral ofticei's of tlie U. S. Army, prisoners of war, had been placed in Charleston, to 
be retained there under fire. Against this wicked work and cruel act I have pro- 
tested. In the mean time tlie fire on the city is continued. I respectfully ask that 
an equal number of rebel officers of equal rank may be sent to me, in order that I 
may place them under the enemy's fire as long as our officers are exposed in 
Charleston. I send Maj. E. N. Strong, in the steamer Mary A. Boardman, to Fort- 
ress Monroe to await your answer, and if my request be granted, to bring down the 
prisoners. Copies of the correspondence will be mailed to you as soon as Major 
Strong arrives at Fortress Monroe. 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General. 

EDWARD N, STRONG, 
Major and Aide-de-Camp. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, June 19, 1864. 

Col. Wiu^iAM Heine, 

Commanding Post, Folly Island:- 
The general commanding directs that you will have a sufficient 
number of boats covered with brush to land a party of 40 or 50 men 
at the rear of Legareville, on the night of Sunday to Monday. The 
expedition will be under the command of Captain Luttwitz, of this 
staff. 

On Monday morning, the 20th instant, a party of 200 men will be 
landed at Legareville ; 100 will be furnished with shovels and con- 
stitute a working party to reduce the works thrown up by the enemy 
back of the village which were used by them against our gun-boats 
last December. The remaining 100 will be armed and act as a guard 
for the working party. A detail from the Rocket Battery will ac- 
company the guard. Colonel Heine will request the co-operation of 
the gun-boats on Monday. 
Very respectfully, 

F. K. SMITH, 
Captain and Aide-de-Camp. 



1 42 . S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA, COAST. TChap! XLVU. 

Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, June 31, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff: 

General : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
letter of the 11th instant. I am now drilling the new negro regiments 
in hopes of making them effective for service in two or three months, 
and at the same time gathering into this place and Morris and Folly 
Islands the best white regiments, so as to obtain a small force of 
really effective men with which to attempt some promising opera- 
tion against the enemy. Considerable preparation has to be made 
to replace the operating engineer and quartermaster material, of 
which so large an amount was taken away by General Gillmore, 
and as soon as these are completed I shall commence to make offen- 
sive movements against the enemy. I shall continue these until I 
succeed at some one of them. I shall not risk much ; at the same 
time, if chance favors, I shall attempt a good deal. This supposes 
that no further draft be made upon this command. With respect to 
this, I must sav that General Gillmore's report that 5,000 more men 
could be spared from this department surprises me very much. He. 
knew very well that he took away the best of the white regiments, 
and that of the colored force very little of it was effective in a haz- 
ardous battle, and nearly 4,000 of it entirely unused to arms and 
ignorant of drill. The entire force left was 15,000 effectives, of 
which one-fourth was required in Florida to hold the country 
in which the citizens had been required to take the oath of alle- 
giance or leave, and thus made dependent upon the good faith of 
the Government for protection. 

Morris and Folly Islands and this island have to be held by a force 
sufficient to make them secure. The only districts in which any 
risks can be run are those of Beaufort (Port Royal and adjacent 
islands) and Florida, in the former of which the plantations for 
freedmen and the schools for their children will be jeopardized, 
and in the latter, the poor people, who want to be loyal to the Gov- 
ernment, will be more or less exposed to rebel barbarity by means 
of guerrilla bands. I am, however, perfectly willing to send 5,000 
men, if they are ordered, and will send the best that remain, and 
will do this with zeal and cheerfulness, for I fully recognize the fact 
that the great struggle of the war is in progress in Virginia, the con- 
quest of which would fully compensate for any losses in this section. 
All that I wish to present for consideration is whether that small 
force will not be more useful here, inasmuch as it will enable me to 
harass the enemy continually, and to call to our front a correspond- 
ing force of rebels, and to be prepared to meet the attack of a supe- 
rior force in case the rebel armies are forced to fall back into this 
State and North Carolina. The force which General Gillmore first ■ 
reported could be spared from this department, as I am informed, 
was from 7,000 to 11,000 men. But upon being ordered to go in 
command in person he increased this estimate, and actually took 
nearly 18,000 men. Brigadier-General Hatch, whom he left in com- 
mand, informed him that the force left here was not sufficient for 
safety, and after his departure felt it his duty to report the matter 
to the Adjutant-General of the Army, which he did in a letter, the 
copy of which I inclose. * 

*SeeMayl3, p. 92. 



Chap. XLVII] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 1 43 

In conclusion, I beg leave to say that as soon as I know tlie wishes 
of the General-in-Chief I will carry them out with alacrity. And 
shouM it be decided to withdraw a portion of the present force I will 
do the best I can with what remains. 
We have transportation available for 3,000 .men to go by sea. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Washington, D. C, June 21, 1864. 
Major-General Foster, 

Department of the South : 
General : Your letter of the IGth instant, transmitting the cor- 
respondence between yourself and the commanding general of the 
rebel forces at Charleston in regard to confining our officers, pris- 
oners of war, in the part of that city exposed to the fire of our baV 
teries, is just received. The Secretary of War has directed an equal 
number of rebel generals and field officers be sent to you by Major 
Strong, to be treated inprecisely the same manner as the enelny treat 
ou rs — that is, to be placed in positions where they will be most exposed 
to the fire of the rebels. In whatever position they may be placed, 
whether in the field or in our batteries or vessels, you will take 
proper precautions to prevent their escape or recapture, putting them 
in irons, if necessary, for that purpose. The Secretary of War di- 
rects that on this point you will exercise great vigilance and that 
the rebel officers will be treated with the same severity that they 
treat ours. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

^ ^ H. W. HALLECK, 

Major-General, Chief of Staff. 



Office West Point Foundry, 

30 Broadway, New York, June 21, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster : 

My Dear Sir : Though I suppose most of the points of, impor- 
tance in regard to the service of my guns are by 'this time under- 
stood, there are one or two that are of such exceeding interest that 
I am induced to mention them. The greatest difficulty now to be 
encountered is in the premature explosion of shells in the bore of 
the gun. The charge of powder they will hold is quite large, and 
owing to the elongated form of the projectile or to its being driven 
into the groves, there seems to be a tendency of the parts of the 
broken shell to wedge in the bore, thus carrying away muzzle or 
some other part, or, at any rate, giving the gun a violent strain which 
is afterward and perhaps by other accidents developed into the 
destruction of the gun. As a means of diminishing this danger, I 
am now lacquering or varnishing the interior surface of the shells. 
Even wheij freshly put in it operates favorably. A little poured in 
at the fuse hole and then caused to run over the sides by laying the 
shells down and rolling it will a;nswer. 

The reason for this seems to be that on firing the gun the powder 
charge of the shells is violently thrown back, and explosion is 



144 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVII. 

caused by the friction or attrition of the powder against the rough 
surface of the bottom and sides of the shell. These are made smooth 
by the lacquer or varnish, &c. 

I have used the 100-pounders as mortars by loading them with a 
very small charge of powder, 3^ pounds, and setting out the ring of 
the projectile in one place only so as to nearly fit a groove, by this 
means, which admits of the shell going down, merely placing the 
expanded portion in one of the grooves of the gun, and have got a 
high-curve traveling, say a range of 3,000 yards, with 20 degrees 
elevation. I have no doubt that when such a fire happens to be de- 
sirable it can be obtained readily with the heavy rifles. The start- 
ing out of the ring iu this way causes it to take the grooves with 
this low charge. 

With the best wishes for your health and success, most truly, yours, 

R. P. PARROTT. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, 8. C, June 22, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff of Armies of United States, Washington, D. C. : 

General : I have carefully considered the different plans for 
taking Fort Sumter, and have come to the conclusion that the fort 
may be taken at any time you order, provided I have at least six 
assaulting rafts or boats, each provided with a very large scaling 
ladder, to be lowered upon the top of the wall, so that 5,000 men can 
scale the walls at the same time. 

At my request Mr. Wiard, of New York, has prepared, with as 
much secrecy as possible, plans for the construction of boats suitable 
for the purpose. I have just received these, and inclose them to 
you. I would like three of each kind. The boats with steam are 
much the best in every respect, as they can always be made useful 
in transporting troops and making landings in creeks and shoal 
waters. It will, however, take more time to build them. 

If you think well of the project, I respectfully ask that you will 
obtain the necessary sanction of the Secretary of War, and order 
the boats at once. I would respectf«lly suggest that the contract 
specify a certain definite time for the delivery of these boats, after 
the expiration of which it shall be optional with the United States 
whether or not to receive them. 

I have the honor to be, &c., 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, June 22, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff, Armies of the United States, Washington, D. C. : 
General : I have the honor to inclose an extract from the Charles- 
ton Tri-weekly Mercury of the 14th instant, giving a list of the 
names of our officers now in confinement in that portion of the city 
of Charleston most exposed to our fire. These are undoubtedly the 



Chap, xlvu.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. . 145 

officers referred to in the communication received by me from the 
rebel General Samuel Jones and of which I wrote in my letter to 
yourself on the 16th instant. 
I have the honor, to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 

[Inclosure.] 

For some time past it has been known that. a batch of Yankee 
prisoners, comprising the highest in rank now in our hands, were 
soon to be brought hither to share the pleasures of the bombaiai- 
ment. They accordingly arrived on Sunday. We give a list of their 
names and rank : 

Brigadier-Generals Seymour, Wessells, Scammon, Shaler, and 
Heckman ; Cols. I. G. Grover, I. R. Hawkins, W. Harriman, T. F. 
Lehmann, O. H. La Grange, H. C. Lee, R. White, H. C. Bolinger, 
H. L. Brown, E. L. Dana, and E. Fardella ; Lieut. Cols, E. L. 
Hayes, H. B. Hunter, T. H. Higinbotham, G. C. Joslin, W. E. Mc- 
Mackin, D. Miles. W. C. Maxwell, J. D. Mayhew, S. Moffitt, E. 
Olcott, J. J. Polsley, A. F. Rodgers, J. H. Burnham, C. B. Bald- 
win, W. G. Bartholomew, W. R. Cook, C. J. Dickerson, J. F. Fel- 
lows, G. A. Frambes, W. H. Glenn, J. P. Spofford, J. W. Stewart, 
A. W. Taylor, and W. P. Lasselle ; Majs. C. H. Beeres, W. F. 
Baker, E. N. Bates, J. E. Clark, D. A. Carpenter, W. Crandall, H. 
D. Grant, J. Hall, and J. H. Johnson. 

These prisoners we understand will be furnished with comfortable 
quarters in that portion of the city most exposed to the enemy's fire. 
The commanding officer on Morris Island will be duly notified of 
the fact of their presence in the shelled district, and if his batteries 
still continue their wanton and barbarous work it will be at the peril 
of the captive officers. 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, June 22, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff, Armies of the United States, Washington, D. C: 
General : I beg leave again to refer to the want of light-draught 
vessels for the operations that I contemplate in this department. 
With several light-draught steamers, such as we had at Fortress 
Monroe and in North Carolina, I could at any time make incursions 
through the creeks and inland waters of this department that would 
result in the destruction of much rebel property, bridges, trestle- 
work, cotton, &c. If I could have the four light-draught steamers 
Burnside, Reno, Parke, and Foster, with the two new ones now 
built in New York, the Savannah and Augusta, with the Thirteenth 
New York Volunteers (heavy artillery). Colonel Howard, to man 
them, I could keep up a small force in constant motion harassing 
the enemy. For this advantage I would be willing to exchange two 
or three regiments of the best infantry. 

I inclose you a drawing* of these boats. Each of them has six 
launches, and is armed with six boat howitzers. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

■j. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 

* Not found, 
10 R R — VOL XXXV, PT II 



146 • S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. IChap. XLVII. 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, June 23, 1864. 

Rear-Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron : 
Admiral : In your communication of the 13th instant you sug- 
gest that a battery be constructed on the south end of Hilton Head 
Island, and offer to furnish two or three 9-inch guns for its arma- 
ment. I should be glad to avail myself of your offer, and will at 
once build a proper work there for two 9-inch guns and two light 
gtins, provided you can furnish me with the ammunition for the 
heavy guns. I should like to have you account for this ammuni- 
tion as expended, if possible; otherwise the ordnance oflBcer who re- 
ceipts for it will have to refer his papers to the Ordnance Depart- 
ment in Washington, who object to make application there for the 
transfer of ordnance and ordnance stores from one department of 
the service to the other. 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, June 23, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, Chief of Staff.- 

General : I shall be ready to commence operations in about one 
week, with a force of 5,000 men, which is all that can be collected 
of the reliable men. I propose, first, to destroy the Charleston and 
Savannah Railroad, and then to make a sudden attack, either upon 
some of the defenses of Charleston or of Savannah. If I fail in 
one I will try the other. I have been collecting information and 
find that the chances are in favor of our success. The most tempt- 
ing movement is to pass through Dewees or Price's Inlet in light- 
draught steamers and boats, and land in boats at Fuller's (C. S. sig- 
nal). Then marching rapidly, I could surprise the intrenchments 
and take the Mount Pleasant and Hobcaw Points. The admiral 
wanted me to do it, but I saw that the risk was all on my part and 
very great. I therefore declined unless the iron-clads would run up 
to the city and into the Wando River to prevent the whole rebel 
force being thrown across that river to attack me in flank. I agreed 
to supply coal to the iron-clads across the peninsula. Admiral 
Dahlgren thought it too risky for the iron-clads and declined. If 
I had 10,000 men I could make this move with safety, and obtain 
the command of the harbor and the capture of the garrison and 
arms on SiiUivan's Island. I am astonished that General Gillmore 
did not attempt this movement, which, with his force, would have 
been almost certain of success. I am making pontoon-boats for 
landing men as rapidly as possible. I am also making torpedo 
catchers to fit to the bows of our small light-draught gun-boats to 
detect the torpedoes with which the rebels have filled their rivers 
and creeks. 

Our great want is light-draught boats fitted to convey men, guns, 
and horses into shoal water, and to land them quickly. The Wiard 
boats built for me in North Carolina, and upon my plans, are just 
the things. With five or six of them and their armament and 
launches, and a good regiment like Howard's, of which one-half are 
seamen, I should be fitted for active work. I would be willing to 
exchange two or three regiments of our best infantry for the above. 



Chap. XLVU.) 



CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 



147 



The admiral thinks that a combined attack is meditated by the 
rebels with their iron-clads from the inside, and the Alabama, 
Florida, &c., from the outside. Their object, he thinks, is to cover 
the exportation of a large quantity of cotton from Darien, Ga. He 
therefore wishes to go down at once and destroy this cotton, or cap- 
ture it. This would, of course, secure a large amount of prize- 
money, but I prefer to cut the railroad first, and then make the 
other military attempts before attending to the cotton, and I think 
it will be done in that order. 

I am rejoiced to hear the cheering news from General Grant. He 
certainly will get Richmond now. Lee will retire to the westward 
as soon as his supplies of ammunition and provisions run low. I 
am expecting news every hour. Whatever the orders are, whether 
to send more men to the north or to make active demonstrations 
with them here, I shall obey them with cheerfulness and carry them 
out with alacrity. 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Opfich OP THE Commissary-General op Prisoners, 

Washington, D. C, June 23, 1864. 
Maj. E. N. Strong, 

Aide-de-Camp, Washington, D. C : 
Major : The rebel officers whom you are to receive to conduct to 
Major-General Foster, at Hilton Head, are at Fort Delaware, and 
Brigadier-General Schoepf, the commanding officer at that post, has 
been instructed to deliver them to you. You will therefore pro- 
ceed without delay, in the steamer provided for the purpose by the 
quartermaster's department, to Port Delaware, and having received 
the general and field officers referred to, you will return to Hilton 
Head and deliver them to Major-General Foster, commanding De- 
partment of the South. The guard detailed to accompany you from 
Fort Delaware is expected to return from Hilton Head with as little 
delay as possible. 

W. HOFFMAN, 
Colonel Third Infantry, Com. Gen. of Prisoners. 





Roll of prisoners of war at Fort Delaware, to he sent to Hilton Head, S. C. 


No. 


Names (by regi- 
ment and com- 
panies). 


Rank. 


Regiment or county 
and State. 


Where captured. 


When cap- 
tured. 


1 


Johnson, Edward . . 
Gardner, Franklin . 

Archer, J. J 

Steuart, George H. . 
Thompson, M. Jeff. 

Carter, E. Welby . . 
Cobb N 


Major-general 




Wilderness, Va... 
Port Hudson 

Gettysburg, Pa 

Wilderness, Va 

Randolph County, 

Ky. 
Loudoun County, Va 
WUderness,Va 


May 12,1864 


!> 


Commanding Port 
Hudson. 


July 9,1863 

July 3,1863 
May 12.1864 
Aug. 22,1863 

Dec 17 1863 


.<t 


Brigadier-general . 


4 


. ..do 


S 


do 


do 


6 


Colonel 


1st Virginia Cavalry 
44th Virginia In- 
fantry. 


7 


do 


May 12,1864 


R 


Duke.Basil W... . 
Fereruson M J 


. . do 


4 


do 


16th Virginia Cav 
airy. 

Buford's brigade . . . 

Morgan's cavahy . . 

Forrest's cavalry. . 

44tb Georgia In- 
fantry. 

50th Virginia In- 
fantry. 


Wayne County, 
Tenn. 

Anderson, Ky 

Bufflngton.'Ohio ... 


Feb 16 1R64 


in 


Hanks J M 


.do 


July 30,1863 
July 19,186:) 
Jan. 6,1864 
May 12,1864 

May 12,1864 


11 


Morgan, Richard C. 


do 


1-^ 


....do 


11 


Peebles W H 


.do 


WUdemess,Va 

do 


14 


Vandeventer, A. S . 


...do 









148 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. CCbap. XEVII. 

Roll of prisoners of war at Fort Delaware, &e. — Continued. 



No. 



Names (by regi 
ment and com- 
panies). 



15 

16 

17 

18 
19 

ao 

SI 
23 
23 
34 
25 
26 
27 



Ward.WUUara W. 

Barbour, William 

M. 
Brown, J.N 



Jaquess, J. A . 
Caudill.B.E . 



Bank. 



Colonel 

do... 

do... 

.. do . 
. . do . , 



Regiment or county 
and State. 



Forney, W.H 

Brewer, Jamas F * 

Daugherty, F.Ht. 

Davant, P. E 

Fitzgerald, J. P.. 

Haynes.C.L... . 

Patton, O. A 

Parsley, W. M . . . . 

Swingley. A. L . 
Tucker, Joseph T. 
Martz, D. H. L. . . . 



Dupree, A 

Jackson.Thonias C. 

Smith.M.J 

Anderson, D. W . . . 



. ..do 

Lieutenant-colonel 

...do 

. . do 

...do 

.do 

do . . . 
...do 



do. 

do 

do. 



Caldwell, J. W... 

Carson, J T 

Ennett, W. T 

Groce.J.E 

Higley, Horace A. 

Henry.E.M 

Nasb.E.A 

Perkins, L. J . . . 

Smith, George H . 

Sanders.E.J 

Steele, T 

Webber, Thomas B 

Wilson, J. M . 

Manning, W. H 

Upshaw, T. E 

Warley.F.F.. 

Davidson, W. L 



Where captured. 



When cap- 
tured. 



do. 
...do 
. do 
Major . 

. .do. 

. .do . 

. . do . 

...do 

...do 

do. 

. . do. 

do. 

..do. 

do. 
. . do . 



...do 

....do 

..do 

. do 

. do 

Lieutenant-colonel 



Ward's Tennessee 

37tb North Carolina 
Infantry. 

14th South Carolina 
Infantry. 

Gardner's staff 

11th Kentucky In- 
fantry. 

10th Alabama In- 
fantry. 

McDonald's brigade. 

Bth Tennessee Oav 
airy. 

38th Georgia In- 
fantry. 

23d Vlrglhla In- 
fantry. 

2ith Virginia In- 
fantry. 

PattoU% Kentucky 
Rangers. 

3d North Carolina 
Infantry. 

.Forrest's brigade. . . 

Chenault's cavalry. 

10th Virginia In- 
fantry. 

Gardner's staff. 

Anderson's brigade . 

C.S.Army 

44th Virginia In- 
fantry. 

1st Kentucky Cav 
airy. 

12th Georgia In- 
fantry. 

3d North Carolina 
Infantry. 

General Wharton's 
staff. 

General B r a g g's 
staff. 

Hunter's cavalry. . 

4th Georjgia Infantry 

50th Virginia In- 
fantry. 

General Wheeler's 
staff. 

Sanders' battalion. 

7th Kentucky Cav- 
alry. 

2d Kentucky Cav 
ah^-. 

7th Louisiana In- 
fantry. 

Cth Louisiana In- 
fantry. 

13th Virginia Cav- 
alry. 

2d South Carolina 
Artillery. 

7th North Carolina 
Infantry. 



BufHngton Island, 

Ohio. 
Spotsylvania, Va 

North Anna River. 



Port Hudson 

Wise County, Va . . 

Gettysburg, Pa — 

Hampshire County, 

Va. 
Livingston, Tenn.. 



Wilderness, Va.. 

...do 

...do 

Morgan County, Ky, 
Wilderness, Va 



Bolivar, Tenn 

Cheshire. Ohio.. 
Wilderness, Va . . 



Port Hudson . 
Gettysburg, Pa . 
Port Hudson . . 
Wilderness, Va . 



Shelby ville, Tenn. . 

Wilderness, Va . . . 

...do 

Natchez, Miss . . 

New Lisbon, Ohio . 

Stone's River, Tenn 
Wilderness, Va 
..do 

Knoxville, Tenn . . 

Aberdeen, Miss 

New Usbon, Ohio . 

..do 

Wilderness, V«k . 

.. do 

Spotsylvania, Va . 

Charleston Harbor 

Wilderness, Va 



July 19,1863 

May 12,1864 

May 23,1864 

July 9, 1863 
July 7, 1863 

July 2. 1863 

Jan. 5, 1664 

Feb 8,1864 

May 12,18&1 

May 13,1864 

May 18,1864 

Oct. 15,1863 

May 12,1864 

Jan. 20,1864 
July 20.IP63 
May 12,1864 

July 9, 1863 

July 3,1863 

July 9, 1863 

May 12,1864 

Oct. 7,1863 

May 12,1864 

May 12,1864 

Dec. 14,1863 

July 26,1863 

Oct. 7,1863 
May 12,1864 
May 12,1864 

Deo. 5,1863 

Feb. 19,1864 
July 2«,18S3 

July 26, 188i| 

May 12,1864 

May 12,1864 

May 14,1864 

Sept. 4,1863 



W. T. HARTZ, 

Captain and Assistant Adjutant- General. 

Office Commissary-General of Prisoners, 

Washington, June 23, 1864. 

* Probably refers to Joseph T. Brewer, of Forrest's Cavalry, captured in Tennessee, 
fin the original a red-ink line is ruled through this name. 



CHAP XLVU.1 COBRESPONDENCli:, ETC.-^UNION. 149 

Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, June 23, 1864. 
Lieut. Thomas J. Robinson, 

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General: 
Lieutenant : Referring to the report of Lieut. Ool. P. Pineo, 
medical inspector, Department of the South, I beg to state that he 
is in part mistaken. Th6 troops at the south end of Folly Island are 
somewhat crowded. They were so placed by my orders, for which 
there existed a militarj"- necessity. They are not, however, on ground 
which had been so long encamped on as that in almost every other 
portion of the island. The companies garrisoning the forts near 
Stono are of necessity on ground which has been almost constantly 
occupied. The Forty-first New York Volunteers was on ground 
a portion of which only had been camped on for the last seven months. 
The Fifty-fourth New York Volunteers is on ground which had been 
unoccupied for about three months. The One hundred and third 
New York Volunteers is on ground which was unoccupied for about 
six months. The Fifty-fifth Massachusetts Volunteers is on 
ground which had not been camped on for about seven months. As 
soon as the necessity for their being placed so closely together ceases 
to exist, and the ground in other parts of the island becomes sea- 
soned by exposure to the atmosphere, the camps will be more sepa- 
rated. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding District. 



Headquarters District oV West Florida, 

Barrancas, Fla., June 26, 1864. 
Maj. C. T. Christensen, 

Asst. Adjt. Gen. , Hdqrs. Div. of West Mississippi : 
Major : I beg to report that some heavy guns, kindly loaned by 
Admiral Farragut, were moved to Forts Pickens and Barrancas, and 
partly mounted, according to inclosed special order, but having jiist 
received the inclosed note from the admiral, I have detained two 
150-pounder Parrotts at Fort Pickens wharf awaiting the orders of 
the commanding general, and would request for instructions whether 
I shall have the 100-pounder rifled gun dismounted and held also 
ready on the wharf for shipment, and to what place. 
Very respectfully, maior, your obedient servant, 

ASBOTH, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 

[Indorsement.] 

General Asboth : 

The heavy guns loaned by Admiral Farragut can be mounted as 
originally intended, as they are not now required for use elsewhere. 

[Inclosure No. 1.] 

Special Orders, ) Hdqrs. District of West Florida, 

No. 135. ) Barrancas, June 8, 1864. 

* * * * * * * 

3. The sixteen heavy guns kindly supplied by Admiral Farragut 
for temporary use at Forts Pickens and Barrancas will be mounted 
as follows : Four 150-pounder rifled Parrott guns at Fort Pickens, 



150 S. C, FLA* AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap XLVII. 

four 9-incli smooth-bore Dahlgren guns at Fort Barrancas, one 100- 
pounder rifled Parrott gun and two 11-inch smooth-bore Dahlgren 
guns at Old Spanish Fort, and four 20-pounder rifled Parrott guns 
and one 18-pounder rifled Parrott gun at Barrancas Redoubt. 

Lieut. F. Rettig, First Florida Battery, acting assistant ordnance 
officer, will superintend the mounting of those guns accordingly, 
and the quartermaster's department will furnish the required mate- 
rial, mechanics, and laborers. 

By order of Brigadier-General Asboth : 

SAML. T. BUELL, 
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. 

[Inclosure No. Z.] 

Flag-Ship Haktpord, 

Off Mobile. 
Brigadier-General Asboth, U. S. Army, 

Commanding Department of Pensacola : 
General ; You will please reserve, if not already mounted, two 
of the 150-pounder rifled guns and all 100-pounder rifled guns, as 
General Canby has made a request that I ^ould supply him with 
some. The Tennessee takes some 11-inch guns, which you can use 
in place of the rifled guns, if you desire them. 
Very respectfully, 

D. G. FARRAGUT, 

Rear-Admiral. 



Headqtjarteks Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, June 37, 1864. 

Gen. H. W. Halleck, * 

Chief of Staff, Armies of the U. S., Washington, D. C. : 
General : I have received your letter of the 21st and will en- 
deavor to carry out your instructions and those of the Secretary of 
War to the very letter. I shall first endeavor to ascertain from 
General Samuel Jones the degree of exposure, the kind and amount 
of rations, the general comforts, as beds, blankets, &c., which are 
given to our prisoners, and then give the same to the rebel pris- 
oners. Every precaution will be taken to prevent escape or recap- 
ture. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

■j. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C.,June 27, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff, Armies of the U. S. , Washington, D. C. : 
General : I have to report that the rebel signal code now used ■ 
by the enemy at Charleston .has been deciphered by Sergt. John 
D. Colvin, of the Signal Corps. For this, which is the result of his 
constant watchfulness, study, and perseverance for several weeks. 



Cbat. XLVIIl CORRESPONBENCE, ETC. — UNION. 151 

night and day, at his station in Fort Strong, I respectfully recom- 
mend that he be rewarded by promotion to lieutenant in the Signal 
Corps, or by a brevet or medal of honor. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-Oeneral, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, June 27, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. A. Schimmelpennig, 

Commanding Northern District, Department of the South : 
General : I am directed by the major-general commanding to 
inform you that his application to the General-in-Chief for rebel 
officers, prisoners of war, for the purpose of awarding them similar 
treatment as is being received by our prisoners in Charleston, has 
been granted. Thirty-five field and general officers are now en 
route for this place, and their arrival is hourly expected. The 
general directs that quarters for their accommodation be erected, 
and in the following places : One in Fort Putnam, one in Chatfield, 
one in Strong, and, if convenient and you think advisable, one be- 
tween Putnam and Chatfield, each capable of accommodating 13 or 
15 officers. The chief quartermaster has been directed to supply the 
necessary men and material for their construction. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Washington, June 28, 1864. 
Major-General Foster, Department of the South: 

General : The Quartermaster-General desires that you send such 
available ocean steamers as may be in your department to New Or- 
leans for the transportation of troops. 

H. W. HALLECK, 
Major-General, Chief of Staff. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, June 28, 1864. 
Capt. John H. Moore, Chief Q. M., Hilton Head, S. C: 

Captain : I am instructed by the major-general commanding to 
direct that all orders given to you by Brig. Gen. John P. Hatch, 
relative to the expedition now being prepared, will be recognized 
by you as though they came from these headquarters. The trans- 
ports for the expedition must be supplied with as many small boats 
as they can take conveniently. Ten teams must be sent with the 
expedition. If you cannot spare this number, you can call on Gen- 
eral Saxton's quartermaster for what you want. General Saxton 
has been informed of this, and also directed to send his quartermas- 
ter here immediately to get what transportation he may want of 
General Saxton's command going with the expedition. 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant-General, 



152 S. C, FLA., AND OK THE GA. COAST. IChAp. SLVtl 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, June 28, 1864. 
Capt. T. A. P. Champlin, 

Chief Com. of Sub. , Dejot. of the South, Hilton Head, S. C. : 
Captain : I am instructed by the major-general commanding to 
direct that you have ten days' rations in bulk, on requisition of the 
officer in charge of the troops on the transports, put on the several 
transports of the expedition now being prepared. Brigadier-Gen- 
eral Hatch will give you the numbers of the boats, &c. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, June 28, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Commanding Department of the South: 

General ; I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of two let- 
lers marked "private and confidential," and handed to me by mem- 
bers of your staff. The letter dated June 18 orders me to hold my 
cominand in readiness, &c. This order has been complied with, 
except as regards the bags for salt, coffee, and sugar. My quarter- 
master has not been able to have them manufactured here, and has, 
as he reports, made arrangements for them at Hilton Head. I 
would like to be informed whether shelter-tents should be taken or 
left behind. In answer to the letter dated June 24, I have most 
respectfully to state that the annexed reports (marine, row-boat, and 
land transportation) were already prepared but required correction 
up to the present date. I have ordered all the ship-carpenters' tools 
to Hilton Head. In regard to future operations I have conversed 
fully on the subject with Lieutenant Suter, of your staff. 

The reconnaissance over the marshes between James and Morris 
Islands has furnished the result that for an attacking column the 
dry ground along the outskirts of the marsh cannot be used, because 
it is not continuous, but that a communication may easily be estab- 
lished between James and Morris Islands after parts of James Island 
are taken. The operation on Mount Pleasant I always have and do 
now consider most promising and to be attained with the least loss 
of life. It presupposes, however, a decisive move on the part of the 
fleet and the destruction of the enemy's iron-clads. The co-opera- 
tion of the fleet in such a decisive manner seems, however, to be out 
of the question for the present. 

The next best operation I have fully discussed with Lieutenant 
Suter. It is more decisive than the former, equally promising, does 
not require the co-operation of the fleet to any extent, but requires^ 
hard work for our infantry, perhaps heavy losses, and presupposes' 
the enemy without any reserve in Charleston, and unable to bring 
up a sufficient number of troops from other places within a few 
days. The enemy is at present without a reserve at Charleston, and 
should he consider Charleston an object of such importance as to 
weaken his forces at Atlanta or in Virginia considerably, and should 
our advance by some reason or accident prove too slow, so as to give 
the enemy time to repel our attack with these re-enforcements, we 
will have solved the great problem of weakening the enemy's main 
armies at the present crisis, notwithstanding our failure in the main 



Cnip. XLVn.1 COREESPONDENCE, El'C. UNION. 153 

object. Our retreat is, under all circumstances, secure. I laid this 
same plan before General Gillmore last winter, but as he may have 
taken the papers with him, I will embody the information I possess 
on the subject in another report. I will have a full report ready in 
regard to the strength and position of the enemy on my front by 
day after to-morrow. I think I can at present, without any risk, 
leave the district for twenty-four hours, and, if you consider it neces- 
sary, verbally give you information when wanted, if in my pos- 
session. 

One of my aides, a strictly reliable gentleman, is the only person 
:acquainted with the contents of this letter and the annexed plan* of 
'Operations. I have not mentioned your plans to any one. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding District. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

FoUy Island, 8. C, June 28, 1864. 
tDapt. "W. L. M. Burger, 

Assistant Adjutarit- General, Department of the South: 
Captain : I have the honor to report that in order to ascertain 
whether the artillery are yet doing picket duty in front of Cole's 
Island I to-day effected an exchange of papers with the enemy, and 
•obtained a Charleston paper of this date. I find that the Second 
Regiment South Carolina Artillery are no longer there. From res- 
olutions published in this paper it Vill be seen that two artillery 
companies have been disbanded ; from the names of the captains I 
conclude them to be the German Light Artillery. There is also an 
order from General Jones calling for the reserves of the Charleston 
District to report on the 5th of July for duty in the field. It fully 
appears that there has been no communication between Charleston 
and Virginia; telegraphic or otherwise, for over a week. 

The paper which I send herewith was exchanged for an unimpor- 
tant Western paper of the 21st instant. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding District. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, June 28, 1864. 
Col. William Heine: 

The general commanding directs that you designate one of your 
staff or other officers, who shall, until further orders, daily inspect 
the boats, scows, &c., to see that they are kept in good serviceable 
condition and in readiness for use at any moment. It has been 
observed that the care of the boats had been neglected.; that they 
have been handled upon the beach and exposed to the sun until they 
have become leaky and in some instances entirely unfit for service. 
The general commanding further instructs me to say that he will 
hold you personally responsible that the boats, &c., are now kept in 
proper order. 

Very respectfully, 

W. B. DEAN, 
Lieutenant, VZ7th Neiv Yorlc Volunteers, A. A. A. G. 

*Not found. 



164 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVII. 

Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C.,June 28, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. John P. Hatch, 

Comdg. Dist. of Hilton Head, &c., Hilton Head, S. C: 

I am instructed by the major-general commanding to inform you 
that the expedition to leave here at sunset on Thursday next will be 
placed entirely under your command. Major-General Foster may 
accompany it, but only to give advice and assistance. 

The force will consist, first, of all the troops that can be spared 
from this district ; second, all the troops that can be spared from the 
District of Florida, under command of Brig. Gen. W. Birney; third, 
all the troops that can be spared from Beaufort, under the command 
of Brig. Gen. R. Saxton or Brig. Gen. E. E. Potter ; fourth, a detach- 
ment from the Northern District, to be under the command of a 
competent oflScer. It is proposed to take as large a proportion of ar- 
tillery and cavalry as the transportation will permit. Orders have 
been issued for transportation to be prepared for one section of artil- 
lery with an extra caisson, 40 cavalrymen and horses, besides 25 or 
30 cavalrymen and horses Brigadier-General Birney will bring with 
him, and ten teams. 

The major-general commanding thinks it will be better if you can 
arrange to take an additional section of artillery with an extra cais- 
son, and I have written to Brigadier-General Saxton to do this, and 
orders have been given to Capt. J. H. Moore, chief quartermaster, 
to take ten teams. Two companies of the engineer battalion will 
accompany the expedition for the purpose, in the first place, of 
rebuilding a certain bridge, for which purpose they should be dis- 
patched in advance, in a small steamer ; after which they will per- 
form the duties of engineer soldiers on the march. One company of 
infantry will be advanced for the purpose of placing the torpedoes. 
An adequate force of naval gun-boats will co-operate. Colonel Bou- 
telle, U. S. Coast Survey, will pilot the boats to the landing at night. 
It is expected that this expedition will sail at sunset on Thursday 
next from this point, on which day Brigadier-General Birney is to 
be here with his forces from Florida. It is expected that a landing 
and a march of 10 miles will be made during Thursday night. De- 
tailed orders must be prepared respecting the embarkation and dis- 
position of the troops. Previous to the sailing of the expedition, 
sealed orders must be given to the commanding officer of each trans- 

Eort, marked on the outside, "To be opened after leaving the har- 
or miles, and after steering southerly in a direction." 

After which the lights must be put out on all the boats of the ex- 
pedition. " 

Major-General Foster desires me to say that the detailed orders 
for sailing, as indicated above, will be prepared at these headquar- 
ters if you wish it. The chief quartermaster has been instructed to ■■ 
take your orders in all matters relating to the expedition as though 
they came from these headquarters. The troops must be provided 
with three days' cooked rations of bread and meat and six days' 
rations 5f coffee and sugar and salt, in knapsacks or haversacks, 
the former preferred. The men to carry 10 rounds of cartridges in 
each pocket, in addition to what can be put in their cartridge-boxeg; 
40 rounds extra for each man will be put on each transport, to be 
stored in a safe place and one convenient to get at. The troops will 
be in light marching order. No baggage of any description will be 



Chap. ILVII.j COJlltESPOXDENCK, El'C. — UNION. 155 

allowed. The men to have only a rubber blanket with an extra 
pair of socks. Those men who have no rubber blankets may take 
either a woolen blanket or overcoat. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, June 38, 1864. 

Brigadier-General Saxton : 

I am instructed by the paajor-general commanding to direct that 
three (if possible, four) of your best regiments, including Colonel 
Montgomery's regiment and one light battery (four pieces and six cais- 
sons), be embarked on transports, and be at this point not later than 
4 p. m. Thursday next. The troops so taken from your district will 
be under the command of yourself or General Potter. On arriving 
at this place you will report to Brigadier-General Hatch for orders 
and instructions. The men will be provided with three days' cooked 
rations of bread and meat and six days' rations of coffee and sugar 
and salt, in their knapsacks or haversacks, the former preferred. 
The men to carry 10 rounds of cartridges in each pocket in addition 
to what can be put in their cartridge-boxes ; 40 rounds extra for 
each man will be put on each transport, to be stored in a safe place 
and one convenient to get at. The troops must be in light marcning 
order. No baggage of any description will be allowed. The men 
to have only a rubber blanket with an extra pair of socks. Those 
men who are not provided with rubber blankets may take a woolen 
blanket or an overcoat. Ten days' rations in bulk will be put on 
each transport. One ambulance of each regiment will be taken ; 
also one wagon for the battery, for grain and extra ammunition. 
Ten wagons have been directed to be placed on the transports sail- 
ing from this point. If the chief quartermaster cannot spare that 
many, he may call on your quartermaster for a few. Please send 
your chief quartermaster to Hilton Head immediately to make ar- 
rangements for the transportation you cannot furnish yourself. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Washington, D. C, June 29, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Department of the South : 
General r Your letter (confidential) of the 32d instant, with plans 
of proposed steamers and ladders for the capture of Fort Sumter, is 
just received. Unless the iron-clads would advance and capture 
Charleston, and I think it is now pretty well demonstrated that 
they will do nothing of the kind, I do not understand the object of 
capturing that place at the pres.ent time. As the rebel batter- 
ies would concentrate their fire upon it, it could be held only with 
a great sacrifice of life, if at all. I see no possible good to result 



156 



S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. 



IOhap. XLVU. 



from the attempt by land forces. What I understand General Grant 
wishes you to do is precisely what in one of your former dispatches 
you proposed doing, i. e., make raids on the enemy's lines of com- 
munication, destroy as much of them as possible, and keep as many 
of his troops occupied at the south as you can. He has given no 
special instructions, but leaves the matter entirely to your judg- 
ment and discretion. In a recent dispatch he remarked that in 
the present condition of the Southern coast, stripped as it was of 
rebel troops, your forces might effect an important diversion. In- 
spection reports ordered by the War Department pretty severely 
censure the former commanders of the Department of the South for 
keeping there, at enormous expense, so large an amount of water 
transportation. A report made since General Gillmore left says 
that there is too much there now ; that it has been neglected, and 
is in bad condition. It is certain that the expenses of that depart- 
ment have been enormous and without any commensurate results. 

I have sent your requisitions and plans for new steamers to the 
Quartermaster-General for his remarks before submitting them to 
the Secretary of War. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. W. HALLECK, 
Major-General, Chief of Staff. 



Inspector-General's Office, 
Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. op the South, 

Folly Island, 8. C, June 29, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. A. Schimmelfennig, 

Comdg. Northern District, Dept. of the South : 
General : I have the honor to make the following return of the 
laud transportation of this district : 







5 


Ambulances. 


a 




Post or regiment. 


i 


J3 


J3 
1 


Bemarks. 


Lieut. J. P. S. Weidensaul, act- 
ing (|uaitennaster, post of 


)■" 


7 
1 


1 


2 


76 

1 

3 

86 


Mule^^ 








Capt. G. W. Gushing, district 
quartermaster, station Folly 


r 

2 

2 
2 


14 




3 

1 




More wagons, &c., than teams. 
Teams may be used as de- 
sired. 

At district headquarters. 

Bemuental use. 


Regimental quartermasters : 
108d New York Volunteers 




9 
3 

8 

8 


74th Pennsylvania Volun- 
teers. 
fi5th Massachusetts Volun- 














Do 


teers. 
54th New York Volunteers . 










Do 














Total a 


41 


27 


1 


6 


1 


194 









o Sixty of the sum total have been issued to Company B, Third New York Light Artillery, to com- 
plete its six-gim battery. Seven will be turned in from the above battery as unAt for that service, 
but suitable for teaming, leaving 53 to be deducted. ' 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. WALES, 
Major and Acting Assistant Inspector- General. 



Chap. XLVII.] OOKRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 157 

Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

FoUy Island, S. C, June 29, 1864. 
Captain Chelius, Commanding Bridge Train: 

Captain: The general commanding directs that you hold your 
bridge train in readiness to move by noon to-morrow, June 30. 
Your men will take three days' cooked rations in haversacks, a rub- 
ber blanket, and an extra pair of socks. They will carry their mus- 
kets, 40 rounds of ammunition in cartridge-boxes, and 40 rounds in 
knapsacks or otherwise well secured. You will take with you on 
the steamer when you leave one small row-boat and one pontoon- 
boat, and on arriving at your destination will unload and use them 
if necessary, otherwise not. Your bridge and men will be embarked 
on a steamer to-morrow afternoon or evening, and taken to Seabrook 
Point. There you will report to Lieutenant Suter, chief engineer 
of the department, and be subject to his orders. The intention is 
then to take the bridge round by boats through Bohicket Creek to 
Haulover Cut, and set up over the cut. Unless otherwise ordered 
by General Foster or the chief engineer, you will, as soon as the 
permanent bridge across Haulover Cut is repaired and in serviceable 
condition, take down your bridge and return with it to Folly Island 
and report to the general commanding. On first arriving to-morrow 
night at North Edisto River, you will not at once land, but your 
steamer must come to anchor in the stream under cover of the gun- 
boat there, and await further orders. It is possible that you may 
have to return to Stono without landing. If you disembark, you 
will in any case send the steamer back immediately to Stono. 
Respectftdly, your obedient servant, 

E. W. SCHAUFFLER, 
Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, June 30, 1864. 
Major-General Halleck, Chief of Staff : 

General : I shall start on the first of my expeditions to-night, if 
General Birney arrives from Florida with his detachment in time. 
I shall land on Seabrook Island and march with the main body to 
the upper end, where I hope to seize the ferry by parties sent in ad- 
vance. I shall then cross over, and, while demonstrating against 
Charleston, destroy the railroad. For this purpose a heavy party, 
under General Birney, will sweep down the road to the Ashepoo 
Ferry, if possible. In the mean time if the gun-boats can be got 
through Wadmalaw River, we will try the strength of Fort Pem- 
berton. Another party, aided by gun-boats and iron-clads, will be 
ready on the Stono to take advantage of any weakening of the line 
from Secessionville across to the river. My definite object is to de- 
stroy the railroad, and this, I think, we shall accomplish. But, in 
addition, we shall worry the enemy, and may possibly find a weak 
spot by which we may penetrate. If so, we shall not fail to profit 
by it. If none are found on the west side, I may, possibly, before 
retiring, attempt to take Fort Johnson by boats. If all these fail, 
I shall turn right about and try Savannah, where I think we can 
make a "ten strike." I am not so sanguine as I would be if I had 
my old North Carolina troops and proper arrangements of light- 
draught steamers for landing in ghoal waters, a§ we had in North 



158 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. (Obap. XLVII. 

Carolina. However, we will do the best we can, and after a few 
trials may become proficient in attempts of this kind. 1 am quite 
sure that, with proper arrangements. Fort Sumter can be taken at 
any time. I have received the prisoners, and the vessel is anchored 
under the guns of the Wabash, where she will remain until the 
prisons are prepared. These will be located in the most exposed 
position near Fort Gregg. 

Very respectfully and truly, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 

P. S. — I inclose you the latest secesh papers received. 

J. G. FOSTER. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. op the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, June 30, 1864. 
Col. William Heine, Comdg. Post, Folly Island: 

The general commanding directs that you send 1,000 men to Long 
Island instead of only 500 as before directed, the men to be taken 
from the Fifty-fifth Massachusetts, One hundred and third New 
York, and Thirty-third U. S. Colored Troops. Captain Quentin, 
aide-de-camp, will inform yon personally of any other changes 
that may have been made in the general arrangement since morn- 
ing. 

Very respectfully, 

W. B. DEAN, 
Lieut., VZ7th Neiv York Volunteers, A. A. A. G. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, June 30, 1864. 
Col. William Heine, Comdg. Post, Folly Island : 

The general commanding directs that you now send the 20 men of 
the New York Volunteer Engineers to Cole's Island, and also 20 
men of the same to Morris Island, if they have not already gone. 
The captain of engineers has not yet returned. The sergeant in 
charge reports that all the planks for the Cole's Island bridge will be 
collected and ready at 6 o'clock this p. m. A suflBcent number of 
the engineers to get this lumber to Cole's Island should be left in 
the engineer camp. 

W. B. DEAN, 
Lieut., 127th New York Volunteers, A. A. A. G. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, June 30, 1864. 
Col. William Heine, Comdg. Post, Folly Island: 

Captain McKenna has arrived and will arrange to fix the bridge 
from Cole's to James Island. The general commanding directs that 
you do not make any detail from the engineer company either for 
Cole's or Morris Island, as directed a short time since. Captain 
McKenna will attend to it all. 

W. B. DEAN, 
Lieut., VZ7th Neiv York Volunteers, A, A. A. G. 



Chap. XLVII] COERESPONDENOE, ETC. UNION. 159 

Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, June 30, 1864. 
Lieut. Col. A. von Mitzel, 

Comdg. Seventy-fourth Pennsylvania Vols., Cole's Island; 
I am instructed by the general commanding to inform you tha^ 
the movement has been postponed for twenty-four hours, when all 
the orders and instructions already given will be carried out. The 
troops must be provided with three days' cooked rations for July 
2, 3, and 4. Captain McKenna, chief engineer, will fix the bridge 
from Cole's to James Island. The general directs that you must 
do the rest of the work. 

W. B. DEAN, 
Lieut, 127th New York Volunteers, A. A. A. G. 



Engineer's Office, 
Fort Clinch, Fla., June 30, 1864. 
General Birney, 

Commanding U. S. Forres in Florida: 

General : The bearer wishes me to state to you the facts, so far 
as I know them, concerning the guns thrown off the end of the 
wharf near Fort Clinch while the enemy were evacuating. When 
our army took possession here in the spring of 1862, search was 
made for those guns, and I think (though of this I am by no means 
certain) that one was recovered. I am quite certain that after 
awhile the search was abandoned, and I have had occasion to 
know that a bar has formed in consequence of foreign deposits that 
have impeded the current to such an extent that I have been obliged 
to abandon that location as a landing. There must now be a depth 
of 6 or 8 feet of sand over a body, that was sunk two years ago, and 
this bank appears to be increasing. Mr. Casner's observation will 
also reveal the same truth. I have been here more than two years, 
having come down with the army of occupation, and if my acquaint- 
ance with any matters here can be of importance to your command 
I beg you to refer to me for such information any of your officers 
or men. It will always give me pleasure to serve the cause or your- 
self by all means in my power. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

f ALFRED F. SEARS, 

Capt., N. Y. Vol. Engs., Engineer in Charge. 

[Indorsement.] 

Headquarters District op Florida, 

Jacksonville, Jidy 11, 1864. 

It appears on evidence of several parties that when the rebels 
evacuated Fort Clinch they threw some pieces of cannon from the 
end of the engineer wharf near the fort into the water. I have had 
these searched for. The result is shown within. 

Respectfully forwarded for information of major-general com- 
manding. 

WM. BIRNEY, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



160 



S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. 



[Chap. XLVIL 



Abstract from return of the Department of the South, Maj. Gen. John G. Foster, 
U. S. Army, commanding, for month of June, 1864. 



■» 


Present for 
duty. 


i 

< 


n 

IS 


Pieces of 
artillery. 


Command. 


O 


d 
1 

108 
2,984 
6,003 
3,808 
2,553 


1 


i 


General headauarters 


59 
1!!9 
229 
165 
100 


167 
4,002 
7,098 
4,9r7 
3,366 


167 
4,968 
8,025 
5,403 

4,274 






Hilton Head District (Hatch) 


95 

25 

(*) 


2 


Northern District (Schimmelfennig) 


g 


Port Royal District (Saxton) 


4 


District of Florida (Bimey) '. 


(*) 






Total 


683 


15,456 


19,610 


22,837 













Abstract from returns of the troops belonging to Department of the Gulf and 
serving in Florida, for the month of June, 1864. 





Present lor 


■g 


^ 


Pieces of 






duty. 




Is' 


artillery. 










Q, 


i 








Command. 






S 


^•a 






Headquarters. 




t 




1 


ll 


^ 


•ri 






g 


1 


u 


ffi 


t 


% 






o 


g 


< 


<! 


n 


Ix 




District of West Florida (Asboth) . . 


88 


2,067 


2,847 


3,1.58 


127 


6 


Barrancas. 


District of Key West and Tortugas 
(Woodbm-y). 


37 


7(« 


1,766 


2,786 


(*) 


(•) 


Key West. 


Total 


125 


2,769 


4,613 


5,944 


127 


6 









Troops belonging to the Department of the Gulf and serving in 

Florida. 



DISTRICT OF WEST FLORIDA. 

Brig. Gren. Alexander Asboth. 



fHrst Brigade {Barrancas). 
Col. William C. Holbrook. 

25th U. S. Colored Infantry, Companies 

A, D, F, G, I, and K, Lieut. Col. 

Frederick L. Hitchcock. 
82d U. S. Colored Infantry, Lieut. Col. 

George Tucker. 
86th U. S. Colored Infantry, Col. M. 

Wilson Plumly. 
7th Vermont, Companies A, B, E, and 

H, Capt. Mahlon M. Young. 

Fort Barrancas. 
Lieut. Col! David B. Peck. 

7th Veimont, Companies C, G, and I, 
Capt. Salmon Dutton. 



Fort Pickens. 
Maj. Harvey A. Allen. 

35th U. S. Colored Infantry, Companies' 

B, C, E, and H, Maj. James W. 

H. Keisinger. 
7th Vermont, Company D, Capt. George 

E. Croff. 
7th Vermont, Company F, Capt. Edgar-' 

N. Bullard. 
7th Vermont,Company K, Lieut. Henry 

StoweU. 

Cavalry. 

1st Florida (five companies). Col. Eu- 
gene von Kielmansegge. 
14th New York, Company M, Capt. 
Adolph Schmidt. 



*Not borne on return. 



Chap. XLVU.] COKRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 161 

DISTRICT OF KEY WEST AMD TORTUQAS. 

Brig. Gen. Daniel P. Woodbury. 



Cedar Keys. 

3d Florida Cavalry (seven companies), 
Maj. Edmund C. Weeks. 



Fort Jefferson. 
110th New York, Col. Charles Hiimilton, 



Key West. 
2d U. S. Cblored Infantry, Lieut. Col. Benjamin R. Towiidend. 



[July 1-()ctober 31, 1864.— For troops in Department of the 
Gulf serving in Florida, see Vol. XLI. ] 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, July 1, 1864. ' 

Capt. C. P. McKenna, 

Company O, New Yorh Vol. Engineers, 

Chief Engineer Northern Dist., Dept. of the South: 
The general commanding directs that you, with the men of your 
company, provided with the three days' rations, &c., ordered for 
the expedition, report at the white house at 10 o'clock this evening ; 
that you have the lumber and materials necessary for repairing the 
bridge from Cole's Island to James there (at white house) at that 
time, and that you must not commence to move up to the white 
house until after dark. 

The general further directs that if you can find time this after- 
noon you will proceed to the lookout on the right of Cole's Island, 
with two of your sergeants, for the purpose of looking at the bridge 
which is to be repaired. The sergeants must not wear their chev- 
rons, nor must anything be worn which will indicate to the enemy 
that you or the sergeants belong to the engineers. 

W. B. DEAN, 
Lieut., 127th New York Volunteers, A. A. A. G. 



Hdqrs. Dept. of S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 

Charleston, S. C, July 1, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Commanding Department of the South, Hilton Head: 

General : I send with this a letter addressed by 5 general officers 
of the U. S. Army, now prisoners of war in this city, to Brig. Gen. 
L. Thomas, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, recommending and ask- 
ing an exchange of prisoners of war. I fully concur in opinion 
with the officers who have signed the letter that there should be an 
exchange of prisoners of war, and, although I am not instructed by 
my Government to enter into negotiations for that purpose, I have 
no doubt that it is willing and desirous now, as it has ever been, to 

11 R R— VOL XXXV, PT II 



162 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVH. 

exchange prisoners of war with your Government on just and hon- 
orable plans. Our difficulty in the way of carrying out the cartel 
of exchange agreed on between the two Governments would not 
exist, that I am aware of, if the exchange was conducted between 
you and myself. If, therefore, you think proper to communicate 
on the subject with your Government I will, without delay, com- 
municate with mine, and it may be that we can enter into an agree- 
ment, subject to the approval of our respective Governments, by 
which the prisoners of war now languishing in confinement may be 
released. I should be glad to aid in so humane a work, and to the 
end that there may be no unnecessary delay on my part I have 
directed an officer of my staff, Maj. John F. Lay, assista,nt adjutant 
and inspector general, charged with the delivery of this, to waft a 
reasonable time in the vicinity of Port Royal Ferry for your answer. 
He is fully informed of my views on this subject, and, if you 
desire it, will confer with you or any officer you may designate. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

SAM. JONES, 
Major-General, Commanding. 

[Inclosure.] 

Charleston, S. C, July 1, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. L. Thomas, 

Adjt. Gen. U. S. Army, Washington, D. C. 
(Through Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, Comdg. Dept. of the South, Hil- 
ton Head, S. C): 

General : We desire respectfully to represent through you to our 
authorities our firm belief that a prompt exchange of prisoners of 
war in the hands of the Southern Confederacy, if exchanges are to 
be made, is called for by every consideration of humanity. There 
are many thousands confined at southern points of the Confederacy, 
in a climate to which they are unaccustomed, deprived of much of 
the food, clothing, and shelter they have habitually received, and it 
is not surprising that from these and other causes that need not be 
enumerated here much suffering, sickness, and death should ensue. 
In this matter the statements of our own officers are confirmed by 
Southern journals. And while we cheerfully submit to any policy 
that may be decided upon by our Government, we would urge that 
the great evils that must result from any delay that is not desired 
should be obviated by. the designation of some point in this vicinity 
' at which exchanges might be made — a coiirse, we are induced to be- 
lieve, that would be acceded to by the Confederate authorities. 
And we are, general, very respectfully, your obedient servants, 

H- W. WESSELLS, 
Brigadier-General, U. 8. Volunteers, 

T. SEYMOUE, 
Brigadier-General. Jj. S. Volunteers, 

E. P. SCAMMON, 
Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, 

C. A. HECKMAN, 
Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, 

ALEXANDER SHALER, 
Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, 

Prisoners of War, 



Chap. XLVH.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 163 

Charleston, S. C, July 1, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Hilton Head, S. C. : 
General : The journals of this morning inform us, for the first 
time, that 5 general ofl&cers of the Confederate service have ar- 
rived at Hilton Head, with a view to their being subjected to the 
same treatment that we are receiving here. We think it is just to 
ask for these officers every kindness and courtesy that you can extend 
to them, in acknowledgment of the fact that we, at this time, are 
as pleasantly and comfortably situated as is possible for prisoners of 
war, receiving from the Confederate authorities every privilege that 
we could desire or expect, nor are We unnecessarily exposed to fire. 
Respectfully, general, your obedient servants, 

H. W. WESSELLS, 
Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, 

T. SEYMOUR, 
Brigadier- General, U. S. Volunteers, 
E. P. SCAMMON, 

Brigadier-General, 
C. A. HECKMAN, 
Brigadier-General of Volunteers, 
ALEXANDER SHALER, 
Brigadier- General, U. S. Volunteers, 

Prisoners of War. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, July 1, 1864. • 
Brig. Gen. E. E. Potter, 

Commanding District of Beaufort, &c. : 

General ; I inclose you two communications* for Maj. Gen. 
Samuel Jones, commanding Confederate forces in South Carolina, 
&c., which the commanding general directs you to send out as soon 
as possible. There is also a box in the hands of Dr. Marsh, Beau- 
fort, for General Seymour, which please have sent forward at the 
same time. General Foster directs that you exercise great vigilance 
in order to prevent spies from going to the enemy during the expe- 
dition. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. F. ANDERSON, 
Major and Aide-de-Camp. 

[Inclosiire. ] 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, July 1, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, 

Comdg. Confederate Forces, . 

S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, Charleston, S. C. : 

General : I have to acknowledge, the receipt of your voluminous 

letter of the 33d. I wish, however, to be informed definitely whether 

the intention declared in your letter of the 13th ultimo has been 

carried into effect. If so, I would respectfully request information 

•Only one incloaure found. 



164 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

as to what portion of the city these officers are now confined. If 
this question cannot be answered for military reasons, will jrou in- 
form me of the degree of exposure to which they are subjected ; 
whether in the part of the city most, or in that least, exposed, or 
that exposed in a medium degree. I would also request you to 
allow one general officer and one field officer of the said prisoners 
to subscribe to and send me a statement giving me the kind and 
quantity of food dealt out to them, also the comforts afiforded them 
in the way of beds, bedding, blankets, &c. The object of these re- 
quests is simply to ascertain the exact manner in which these offi- 
cers are treated, that I may treat in the same manner a like number 
of your officers of equal rank that are now placed in my hands by 
the Government. 

. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Jvly 4, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, 

Comdg. Confederate Forces, 

S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, Charleston, S. C. : 
I have received your letter of the 1st instant, covering a letter from 
the 5 general officers of the U. S. Army, now prisoners of war in 
Charleston, to Brig. Gen. L. Thomas, Adjutant-General U. S. Army. 
I fully reciprocate your desire for an exchange of prisoners, but 
* before any steps can be taken to effect it, it will be necessary for you 
to withdraw from exposure to our fire those officers now confined, in 
Charleston. I have not yet placed your prisoners in a similar posi- 
tion of exposure. 

Very restwctfuUy, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 
• ■ July 4, 1804. 

Brig. Gens. T. Seymour, H. W. Wessells, C. A. Heckman, E. 
P. Scammon, and Alexander Shaler : 

My Dear Friends : I have received your letter of the 1st instant, 
and will observe your wishes in the treatment of the prisoners now 
placed in my hands. We all regret very much the circumstances of 
your being placed under our fire in Charleston, and every one feels ^ 
justly indignant at this barbarous treatment of prisoners of war. T" 
will endeavor to have your wants supplied as far as possible, and 
have requested the Sanitary Commission to forward what articles 
they havtt on hand suited to your necessities. I believe your ex- 
change might be effected, rank for rank, provided as a first step 
General Jones should relieve you from your position of exposure to 
fire. 

Very respectfully and truly, yours, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
, Major-General, Commanding. 



Chap, XLVn.] COKRESPONBENCE, ETC. — UNION. 165 

Headquarters District op Florida, 

Barrancas, July 4, 1864. 

Maj. C. T.' Christensen, 

Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Div. of West Mississippi: 

Major : In compliance with General Orders, No. 3, headcniarters 
Division of West Jlississippi, I beg to report regarding affairs in 
this district and its vicinity. Most of the rebel troops' in West 
Florida and Alabama have left to re-enforce Johnston at Atlanta 
and Polk, Forrest, and Roddey's army, on the Mobile and Ohio Rail- 
road, in Mississippi. Refugees and deserters report the balance of 
rebel troops in my neighborhood distributed as follows : Mobile, 
militia only enough to do the guard duty ; Fort Morgan, 600 men ; 
Camp Withers, two companies cavalry ; Camp Andrew, at Bon- 
secours Bay, four companies infantry, guarding salt-worlcs ; Camp 
Powell, near Perdido River, one company cavalry ; at Pollard, five 
companies infantry and the Fifteenth Confederate Cavalry, Colonel 
Maury commanding, under marching orders ; at Fifteen-Mile Sta- 
tion, on the Pensacola and Pollard Railroad, 600 cavalry and three 
pieces artillery ; between the Escambia and Chattahoochee Rivers, 
three companies of cavalry ; at and around Milton, one-half com- 
pany at Elba, one-half at Abbeville, one-half at Newton, and one 
at Marianna. 

Considering the comparatively very small number of rebel troops 
thus scattered in West Florida and Alabama, in twenty counties, 
comprising more than 20,000 square miles, I beg respectfully to rec- 
ommend a cavalry raid as far as Columbus, Ga. Possessing the 
most minute information, I am confident that 2,000 men, well 
mounted and armed, would be sufiicient to do the work safely and 
obtain brilliant results of vital importance, facilitating greatly the 
success of our armies in Virginia and Georgia, and while much 
reducing the rebel resources in general, forcing, especially, starva-- 
tion upon Mobile, thus rendering one of the most formidable rebel 
strongholds Qpmparatively helpless. If enabled by the command- 
ing general to make the raid, I would enter Saint Andrew's Bay on 
steamers, land near Bethem's Mill, at McCormick's Landing (15 feet 
depth), and destroy the numerous salt-works, with a daily produce 
of 500 bushels of salt for the so-called Confederacy ; take the Hick- 
ory (Orange) Hill road, and, leaving Marianna, Abbeville, and Fort 
Gaines on the right, ent^>r Newton (a rebel depot for bacon and 
corn), strike the terminus of the Macon and Georgetown Branch 
Railroad at Eufaula, destroy the railroad and telegraph line, and 
leaving Union Spring to the left, cross the railroad at Silver's Sta- 
tion, and destroy the Mobile and Girard Railroad, enter Columbus, 
Ga., destroy all the Government machine-shops, factories and manu- 
factories, and fifteen warehouses full of cotton ; destroy also the 
Columbus and Macon, Colunibiis and Opelika, and West Point and 
Montgomery Railroads. From Opelika I would continue on the 
north side of the railroad to Wetumpka, a military prison, with 
over 3,000 Union prisoners, and, liberating them, march upon Mont- 
gomery, the capital of Alabama, and destroying the railroads around 
the city, with the Government machine-shops and cotton warehouses, 
proceed on the public road east of the railroad down to Pollard ; 
there also destroy the railroad, numerous engines, apd very valuable 
rolling-stock, and return from Pollard via Fifteen-Mile House and 
Pensacola to Barrancas. 



166 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

Along the line above designated the roads are good, somewhat 
sandy in Florida, but hard in Alabama, nowhere intersected by- 
rivers, it being throughout the water divide. The country from 
Hickory Hill upward is rich and productive. Men and horses could 
subsist upon the country and find everywhere good fresh water in 
abundance. 

The people on the designated line from Hickory Hill to Columbus 
are tired of rebellion and anxious to return to the Union, and the 
woods being full of deserters, I am confident that by starting with 
2,000 men I would strike at Columbus with double that number. 

I beg to inclose (Sub- A*) a table of distances, going by water 120 
miles and by land 452 ; time required, sixteen to twenty days. A 
glance upon the map of the United States shows, and the past con- 
duct of the rebellion proves, that the Mobile, Montgomery and Co- 
lumbus Railroad, with its tributaries and connections, is one of the 
main and vital arteries of the rebel Confederacy, and the only undis- 
turbed line of communication between Richmond, Savannah, and 
Charleston with the lower Mississippi regions and the Gulf States, 
and it seems beyond a doubt that the destruction of such an impor- 
tant railroad line at seven different points, as within contemplated, 
with the destruction of numerous engines, valuable rolling-stock, and 
all other rebel property above alluded to, would certainly be a stun- 
ning blow upon the hydra of this wicked rebellion. I therefore most 
respectfully request the commanding general's sanction to make the 
raid, and his orders for the use of a cavalry force of 2,000 for the 
time of one month only. At present I have but one company of 
cavalry mounted. Company M, Fourteenth New York Cavalry, 
numbering 80 men and 59 horses. The Florida cavalry, already six 
companies strong, have no arms and no horses. The men all en- 
tered my lines from rebeldom and enlisted in the U. S. Army with 
.the fervent desire to revenge under the Union flag all the wrongs 
inflicted upon them and their families by the rebels. They are all 
good horsemen, all good marksmen, and perfectly faqiiliar with the 
country and people throughout Florida, Alabama, and Georgia. 
Thus their services in the field, if well mounted and armed, would 

Erove more efficient here than of any veteran cavalry regiment. I 
eg, therefore, to inclose duplicate of requisitions already forwarded 
for arms and horses, respectfully requesting the commanding gen- 
eral's approval and orders, and I confidently hope that the 500 Florida 
men when mounted will each, in less than a month, bring an addi- 
tional horse from rebeldom into their camp. 

For the pres.ent I am restricted to my small infantry force, and 
although without proper land and water transportation, I will make 
an infantry advance in a few days up the Perdido with the view of 
doing considerable harm to the rebels. 

Very respectfully, major, your obedient servant, 

ASBOTH, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 

[Indorsement.] 

This comes rather informally but is worthy of consideration. 

General Asboth underrates the force of the enemy, and his esti- 
mate of the cavalry force required to perform the work he has in 
view is too small. 
ED. R. S. CANBY. 

* Not found. 



Chap, xlvu.] CORRESPOKDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 167 

Quartermaster-General's Office, 

Washington, D. C, July 6, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff, Washington, D. C. : 

General : I have the honor to return the letter* of General Fos- 
ter asking that the Thirteenth New York Heavy Artillery may be 
ordered to the Department of the South, with the armed trans- 
ports Burnside, Reno, Parke, and Foster, built by Mr. Wiard, and 
that the Savannah and Augusta, also built by Mr. Wiard, may be 
likewise forwarded to him for operations in the department under 
his command. The first four of these steamers were purchased hy 
this department under urgent requisitions from the commanding 
generals of North Carolina and at Fort Monroe. Three are now 
in the waters of the Department of Virginia and North Carolina, 
and one repairing at Baltimore. Reports received at this office 
as to their efficiency and value are contradictory. I inclose an 
abstract of these reports, f General Butler informed me verbally 
that he found them very useful. My own opinion is that while 
they can penetrate shallow creeks, defended only by musketry, 
they are liable to meet field or heavier guns in almost all such expe- 
ditions, and that they would almost certainly be sunk upon coming 
under fire of artillery; still, any wooden gun-boat with exposed 
boilers is liable to this accident, and, in the experience of the cam- 
paign on the Southern coast, the navy has lost more than (me in 
such conflicts. The Savannah and Augusta are, it is reported by 
Mr. Wiard (see his letter inclosedf), completely fitted for service. 
The guns and carriages, I understand, have been furnished at the 
expense of the War Department. I know of no promise or obliga- 
tion on the part of the United States to purchase these vessels. He 
desires to have them brought to this city for tlie purpose of inspec- 
tion. 

If the operations contemplated by General Foster are approved 
and sanctioned, I think these two steamers should be sent to him, 
provided they can be obtained at a reasonable cost and on inspection 
prove to be well constructed. They are armed transports rather than 
gun-boats, inferior in strength and superior in carrying capacity to 
what are generally understood to be gun-boats. With them the 
troops can penetrate the creeks to some extent and harass the 
enemy. Without some such vessels I presume a purely defensive 
attitude, waiting for attack, only can be maintained. 

Over the four vessels asked for, but now under General Butler's 
command, the Quartermaster-General can exercise no control. 

The requisition of General Foster is respectfully returned. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

M. C. MEIGS, 
Quartermaster- General. 

[First indorsement.] 

July 9, 186+. 
Respectfully referred to Lieutenant-General Grant, for his decis- 
ion on the plans of General Foster and on sending to him the boats 
now in General Butler's department. 

H. W. HALLECK, 
Major- General, Chief of Staff. 

'See June 22, p. 144. f Omitted. 



168 • S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVU. 

[Second indorsement.] 

Headquarters Armies op the United States, 

City Point, Va., August 16, 1864. 
Respectfully returned. 

As I have requested that all the troops that can be spared from 
General Foster's command be brought forward, and that General 
Foster for the present act purely on the defensive at Charleston, 
there is no necessity for sending these vessels. 

U. S. GRANT, 

Lieutenant- General. 



U. S. S. Wabash, 
Port Royal, S. C, July 6, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, U. S. Volunteers, 

Commanding Department of the South : 
General : By dispatch received yesterday from Admiral Dahl- 
gren I am informed that it is contemplated by the army forces to 
erect a battery of two guns on Scull Creek, and that the guns are 
to be furnished by me upon your requisition. In accordance there- 
with, I beg to state that the guns (caliber 8 or 9 inch) will be 
promptly sent whenever you may call for them. 

I remain, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOHN D. CAMP, 
Captain, U. S. Navy, Commanding, &c. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

HiUon Head, S. C, July 7, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff, Washington, D. C. : 

General : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
letter of June 25 in regard to the order of Colonel Hallowell, Fifty- 
fourth Massachusetts Volunteers. I feel very much mortified that 
this thing should happen, and all I can do is to offer an explanation. 
The whole affair was a misconception on the part of one of my staff 
officers, who was not authorized to issue the order to Colonel Hal- 
lowell that he'did. The officers of the two regiments, the Fifty -fifth 
and Fifty -fourth Massachusetts Volunteers, in view of the very bad 
condition of the men of their regiments, who were in want of their 
pay, were extremely anxious to take some steps by which it might 
be remedied. I therefore consented to permit Colonel Hallowell to 
go to New York on leave of absence, witli permission to ask leave to"' 
visit Washington. An order, instead of the requisite leave of 
absence, was given through a misunderstanding. I am well aware 
of the prohibition of allowing officers to visit Washington, and have 
always strictly observed it. Colonel Hallowell has been ordered to 
return immediately to his regiment. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Chat-. XLVn.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 169 

Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, 8. C, July 7, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff, Washington, D. C. : 

General : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
letter of June 28, directing me to send all the available ocean trans- 
portation in this department to New Orleans. 

At the time of the receipt of this communication I was engaged 
in making a demonstration against the enemy, and have employed 
every steamer available in this department, and they are now 
actively employed in the same movement. I have not, in fact, a 
single steamer here suitable for ocean navigation, General Gill- 
more having taken with him all that were really suited for that 
purpose. 

Two ocean steamers have just entered the harbor from the North, 
the Harnak and the Star of the South, and I have ordered them to 
proceed at once to New Orleans. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, July 7, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff, Washington, D. C. : 

General : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
letter of the 29th ultimo with reference to the reports made con- 
cerning the transportation in this department. 

I have caused to be prepared a list of all the transportation now 
here, the exact condition of the vessels, capacity for holding troops, 
&c. This will show that the whole amount available will only con- 
vey about 5,000 men in operations about the coast. This is the least 
number of men that should be used in making raids, and the least 
number of vessels for that purpose and for supplying the different 
districts with quartermaster and subsistence supplies. 

I do not see how the transportation now in this department can be 
reduced with safety. A considerable number of the steamers are 
useless and are being repaired, but they are being put in condition 
for active service as rapidlv as possible. Several other small 
steamers have been sent North, either to be discharged or for repairs 
that cannot be made here. 

I have directed my particular attention to the transportation 
since I took command, have made available all that could be used 
in expeditions, and have taken the necessary steps to have all the 
unserviceable vessels either repaired here or sent North for this pur- 
pose or to be discharged. 

Very respectfully, general, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major- General, Commanding. 



170 8. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVU. 

Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, July 7, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. H. W. Hall^ck, 

Chief of Staff: 

General : I liave the honor to transmit herewith a communica- 
tion* signed by Brigadier-Generals Wessells, Seymour, Heckman, 
Shaler, and Scammon, received by flag of truce July 5, 1864, asking 
that every courtesy and kindness may be extended to the rebel offi- 
cers now in my hands. 1 would respectfully state everything con- 
sistent is allowed these officers, and that they are treated in every 
respect and their comfort attended to in the same manner our 
officers are treated. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, July 7, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff, Washington, D. C. : 

General : I have the honor to irfclose a letterf from General 
Samuel Jones, covering a letter to the Adjutant-General U. S. Army 
from Brig. Gen. H. W. Wessells, and other general officers now 
prisoners of war in Charleston. 

I inclose also a copy of my replyf to General Samuel Jones. If 
it meets the views of the Government to exchange these prisoners, 
rank for rank, or its equivalent, I respectfully ask that the- requisite 
authority may be given to me, and I will see that the exchange is 
properly conducted. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major- Gen eral. Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, Jtdy 7, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, 

Comdg. Confederate Forces, S. C, Ga., and Fla. : 

General : During a recent movement on John's Island Dr. W. T, 
Robinson, of the One hundred and fourth Regiment Pennsylvania 
Volunteers, was taken prisoner by your forces. I would respect- 
fully request that he be released, in accordance with the well-estab- 
lished custom of releasing medical officers of both armies. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 

*See July 1, p. 163. 
fSee pp. 161, 164. 



Chap. XLVU.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 171 

Headquarters U. S. Forces, 
Saint Augustine, Fla., July 7, 1864. 

Lieut. Col. E. W. Smith, 

A. A. G., Dept. of the South, Port Royal, S. C: 

Colonel. : I have the honor to report that nothing has occurred 
since my last dispatch worthy of special mention. 

A little tug called the Montones, Captain Hayes, came into this 
port on her way to Montones, Cuba, and was viewed with great sus- 
picion. Such 1 find*to have been the case at Fortress Monroe, Beau- 
fort, N. C, and Hilton Head. At the latter place she was thor- 
oughly overhauled. I had detectives at work, but was unable to 
get sufficient evidence to warrant me in seizing her. One of the 
crew, a rampant, noisy rebel and armed blockade-runner, I arrested 
and sent by to-day's boat, the Collins, to the Head. I recommend 
that he be sent to New York. The Montones would be a most serv- 
iceable boat for the rebels in Indian River, and despite her excellent 
papers I fear such may be her destination. 

There is scarcely a whisper of disloyalty here, though undoubt- 
edly there may be latent treason. The people seem to be satisfied 
with the government of the post, which I endeavor to keep thorough 
and strict, though kind. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOS. R. HAWLEY, 
Colonel Seventh Connecticut Volunteers, Comdg. Post. 



Hdqrs. District op Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, July 7, 1864. 
Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Assistant Adjutant- General : 

Captain : The apprehensions expressed by me to the major- 
general commanding in regard to the probable movements of the 
enemy appear to be justified by the facts, as a movement of the 
rebel forces has been made toward Yellow Bluff. Major Mayer, of 
that place, reports that Colonel McCormick, Second Florida Cavalry, 
has taken his advance camp on the headwaters of Trout Creek. A 
rebel vedette has been pushed to the Saint John's, between Trout and 
Cedar Creeks, and five torpedoes have been taken up by our boats in 
that vicinity yesterday and to-day. The lookout on our signal tower 
reports a number of camp-fires seen for two days in the neighbor- 
hood of Trout Creek. In the course of to-morrow I hope to know 
what the force of rebels is, and I shall attack them just as soon as 
Colonel Beecher's regiment gets its arms, which I trust will be by 
the next boat. 

I send up the camp and garrison equipage of the Seventh U. S. 
Colored Troops. That of the Seventy-fifth Ohio Volunteers cannot 
be found ; it is probably at Picolata, where are now the headquarters 
of the regiment. , 

On my return I find that the horses necessary to the battery have 
not been supplied, owing to the losses by glanders, and that it is im- 
possible to put in service more than five of these fully equipped. I 
send three of these, reserving two for use here as by directions. I 
trust the major-general will send these back as soon as they can be 
spared from his operations, for in ray present paucity of numbers 



172 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVII. 

this battery is my best available means of attack. As tlie lower Saint 
John's is my weak point, and a most important one, I shall move 
with what troops I have and drive the enemy from Trout Creek at 
all hazards. Colonel Beecher's regiment, the Thirty-fifth U. S. Col- 
ored Troops, numbers only a little over 320 men for active duty ; of 
these 90 are without arms, and the rest have four kinds of arms, 
none of them fit for service. The battalion at Stono River is armed 
with the Springfield rifle muskets, and I have written an important 
request to the Head to forward to this place the rest of the arms 
required. 

With the most earnest hope for the success of the major-general, 
I remain, your obedient servant, 

WM. BIRNEY, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, 8. C, July 10, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. A. Schimmelfennig, 

Comdg. Northern Dist. , Depi. of the South, Folly Island, S. C. : 

General : I am instructed by the major-general commanding to 
state that a siege train of five 20-pounder Parrott guns, four 10-inch 
siege mortars, two 8-inch siege howitzers, and one 24-pounder rifled 
gun will be sent to you to be placed in position wherever they may 
be required. If they are placed either on Black or James Island the 
battery must be made thoroughly secure against attack by surprise, 
made so by surrounding them with good, substantial picketing. 

The major-general commanding further directs that the bombard- 
ment of Fort Sumter, as commenced, must be continued. He will 
be up on Tuesday or Wednesday next to examine it in person. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, ' ,. 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Hdqrs. Northern District Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, July 11, 1864. 

Col. William Heine, 

Commanding Post: 
Colonel : The general commanding directs that you station the 
pickets now as heretofore, except that you will send 100 men and a 
section of the Rocket Battery to Kiawah Island instead of the usual 
number. The general commanding further directs that the detach- 
ment to Kiawah Island be sent to-morrow, 12th instant, and that they 
proceed with great caution to their post to avoid being ambushed or 
surprised by the enemy, and that wheg. the outposts are duly sta- 
tioned and the ground has been examined in the vicinity, that only 
the usual number remain there and the balance will return to camp. 
■ Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. B. DEAN, 
Lieut, 127th New York Volunteers, A. A. A. G. 



Chap. XLVU.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 173 

Headquarters District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, July 12, 1854. 
Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Assistant Adjutant-General : 

Captain : In compliance with the order of the 10th instant, just 
received, I have ordered the Fourth Massachusetts Cavahy to em- 
bark for Hilton Head. They shall be sent forward as rapidly as 
transportation will permit. This deprives me of all the mounted 
men who have been doing duty in front of Jacksonville. There are 
no other mounted men in the district, except the Seventy-fifth Ohio 
Volunteers, which can put into the field at any one time not over 
250 mounted men, and wnich is the only force charged with the de- 
fense of Picolata and the country to the south of Saint Augustine 
and Picolata. The execution of your order will leave me with about 
300 mounted men for the service at all points. As the rebels have a 
cavalry regiment in front of Jacksonville, I shall be obliged to take 
nearly all the mounted men for duty here. How I shall guard 
Picolata and the east bank of the Saint John's I do not now see. A 
large number of families have settled there under our promise of 
protection. If we abandon them the rebels will commit among them 
the usual atrocities. The raising of a Florida battalion is impracti- 
cable just now ; men refusing to enlist because they think that 
Florida is about to be evacuated. If the major-general command- 
ing will send one of the new regiments of colored troops to Florida, 
I think it will have the happiest effect. 

The movements of the rebels toward Trout Creek continue. Their 
camp-fires are seen daily ; their vedettes are pushed forward to the 
bank of the river and withdrawn. Within a few days past they 
have reconnoitered Yellow Bluff, the mouth of Trout Creek, near 
the gun-boat, and have built a good lookout in the top of a tree over- 
looking the gun-boat Ottawa. I had already started on an expedi- 
tion to reconnoiter up Trout Creek when your order met me. In a 
day or two, however, I shall try it with infantry and endeavor to 
drive the rebels from their new camp. I had expected to send two 
Wiard guns and caissons to Stono Rive? , but find that, although the 
requisition was approved, they were not sent. They are still at 
Hilton Head. 

Your obedient servant, 

WM. BIRNEY, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Flag-Steamer Philadelphia, • 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C, July 13, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Headquarters Hilton Head: 
Sir : It often occurs that contrabands and others, enlisted in the 
naval service, desire to be discharged here when their terms have 
expired — that is, they desire to remain ashore, which is your juris- 
diction, and this can only be done by your permission. While de- 
clining, therefore, to interfere with your authority, permit me to 
observe that it seems very objectionable to permit a population to 
grow up here of persons from whom there is no guarantee that they 
may not in some way become -useful to the enemy, it being their 



174 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. IChap. XLVII. 

interest to stand well with both sides. And I hope, therefore, that 
the practice will only be allowed on condition of such residents 
rendering military service. No man should be neutral in this great 
emergency. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGKEN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Hdqes. Dept. of S. Carolina, Gbokgia, and Florida, 

Charleston, S. C, July 13, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Comdg. U. S. Forces, Hilton Head, S. C. : 
General : I have received your letter of the 1st instant. Mine of 
the 13th and ii2d ultimo indicate, with all necessary precision, the 
location of the U. S. officers who are prisoners of war in this city. 
I cannot well be more minute without pointing out the very houses 
in which they are confined, and for reasons very easily understood 
I am sure that this will not be expected. If the statements in my 
letter of the 22d ultimo are insufficient, the letter of the 5 general 
officers, dated the 1st instant, in which they assure you that they 
"are as pleasantly and comfortably situated as is possible for prison- 
ers of war, receiving from the Confederate authorities every privi- 
lege that we (they) could desire or expect, nor are we (they) unneces- 
sarily exposed to fire," gives you all the information in regard to 
their treatment that you can reasonably desire. 

In conclusion, let me add that I presume from a copy of your con- 
fidential order of the 29th ultimo,* that you were commanding in 
f)erson the troops operating against the city, and as you had particu- 
arly requested me to communicate with you only by way of Port 
Royal Ferry, I felt bound to delay my reply until I was assured it 
would promptly reach you by the route you were pleased to indi- 
cate. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

SAM. JONES, 
Major- General, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. Dept. of S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 

Charleston, S. C, July 13, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

. Commanding U. S. Forces, Hilton Head, S. C. : 
General : Your letter of the 4th, in reply to mine of the 1st, has 
been received. I am pleased to know that you reciprocate my djg- 
sire for aia exchange of prisoners, but regret that you should require 
as a condition precedent to any negotiation for this end that I 
should remove from their present location the U. S. prisoners of 
war now in this city. Such a course on my part would be an implied 
admission that those officers are unduly exposed and treated with 
unnecessary rigor, which they have themselves assured you in their 
letter of the 1st instant is not the case. I regard the exchange of 
prisoners as demanded alike by the rules of civilized warfare and the 

' *SeePartI, p. 126. 



Chap. XLVII.) CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 175 

•dictates of common humanity, and to require a change of location 
which you have every reason to know the prisoners do not themselves 
desire is to throw an unnecessary obstacle in the way of accomplish- 
ing this end, and thus to retain prisoners of war in irksome confine- 
ment. The change I most prefer would be to send them to your 
headquarters, and this may yet be done, unless defeated by obstacles 
interposed by yourself or your Government. 

I was notified of your request to send a staff officer to meet one of 
yours at Port Royal at 3 p. m. to-day, too late to comply therewith. 
I have, however, directed the officer of your staff to be informed 
that I would send an officer to meet him at 4 p. m. to-morrow, and 
have accordingly directed Maj. J. F. Lay, assistant adjutant and 
inspector general, to take charge of this letter and deliver it at Port 
Royal Ferry. I repeat that he is fully advised of my views, and 
should you desire it will confer with you or any officer of your staff 
whom you may designate. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

SAM. JONES, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. Dept. of S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 

Charleston, S. C, July 13, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster. 

Commanding U. S. Forces, Hilton Head, S. C. : 

General : Permit me to say, in reply to your letter of the 7th 
instant, that I am not aware of any ' ' well-established custom of 
releasing medical officers of both armies." I shall, however, make 
the necessary inquiries on this point, and if the custom referred to, 
which I believe has of late fallen into disuse, from what causes I 
need not say, is still regarded I shall be governed thereby. It is, 
however, proper to say that Dr. W. T. Robinson, of the One hun- 
dred and fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers, was not when captured 
attending to the sick and wounded of your army, but was separated 
from his command, apparently engaged in reconnoitering the coun- 
try. While I hope that no obstacle to his release may arise, I regret 
to be compelled to detain him until the facts in his case can be more 
particularly learned. 

The blank pay accounts have been disposed of as requested. 
Very respectfully, &c., 

SAM. JONES, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, July 16, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, 

Comdg. Confederate Forces, Dept. of 8. C, Ga., and Fla. : 

General : Regarding the case of Dr. W. T. Robinson, of the 
One hundred and fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers, captured by your 
pickets on John's Island, I deem it proper to say that at the time of 
his capture he was not, as you state in your letter of the 13th instant 



176 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVH. 

appeared to be the case, " reconnoitering the country." Having 
been detained as the regiment moved in the morning on professional 
duty, he missed his way in following, and thus met your pickets. 
With respect to the custom of liberating surgeons when captured, I 
have to say that it has been my custom while in command both in 
North Carolina and East Tennessee. Your action in the present 
case will determine whether the custom will be continued in this 
department. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, July 16, 1864. 

Capt. J. W. Grace, 

Ordnance Officer, Northern DisL, Dept. of the South: 

Captain : I am instructed by the general commanding to inform 
you that the reasons why he considers navy howitzers as needed in 
this district are as follows : 

We are obliged to defend positions on islands difficult of approach 
or approachable only over long dikes or by boat, and where it would 
not be wise to expose any heavy pieces of artillery. We may at any 
time find it necessary, as we have already done, to cross-over and 
attack the enemy on similar islands, to which we have no means of 
approach excej^t row-boats. The navy howitzers being capable of 
transportation in row-boats, and it being perfectly practicable where 
there are no horses to draw them by hand, the general considers 
them as a most useful piece of ordnance to have in this command. 
I have the honor to be, your obedient servant, 

E. W. SCHAUFFLER, 
Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, July 16, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. W. Birney, 

Commanding District of Florida, Jacksonville, Fla. : 

General : Your communication of the 12th instant has been re- 
ceived. I am instructed by the major-general commanding to in- 
form you that the number of troops now in your command is con- 
siderably greater than that section of the department demands in a- 
military point of view. If you cannot properly guard the Sainf 
John's River you must prepare to make Saint Augustine your base, 
keeping Jacksonville and Picolata as advanced points of defense if 

Eracticable. In case of immediate danger of the Saint John's River 
eing rendered impracticable for navigation by reason of the enemy 
gaining possession of points along the banks, or by reason of the.ir 
planting a great number of torpedoes in the river, the communica- 
tion from Jacksonville to Saint Augustine must be by a ferry across 
the river, which you must take pains to provide in season, and by 
land across the country. 



Chap. XLVH.) CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 177 

As to the idea of the abandonment of the country, the major-gen- 
eral commanding states that there is no necessity for the circulation 
of such an idea, as the country is not to be abandoned unless you 
are forced to do so. If you are forced from the west bank of the 
Saint John's or from any section now held by your troops, you must 
give ample time to loyal citizens to take care of themselves and 
property. Major-General Foster states, however, that he cannot see 
cause for any apprehension of this kind, as your force is certainly 
superior to that of the enemy, and is, instead of being the smaller, 
actually larger than there is any imperative necessity for. The 
major-general commanding expects vou to do the best you can with 
what force you have at your disposal. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



General Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department op the South, 

No. 109. S Hilton Head, S. C, July 16, 1864. 

General Orders, No. 66, from these headquarters, dated August 7, 
1863,* is hereby amended to read as follows : 

I. The practice of giving information t^i their friends, or to the 
public i)ress, on matters connected with military operations in prog- 
ress or in contemplation, so unscrupulously indulged in by officers, 
soldiers, and citizens in this department, and by employes on trans- 
ports, is fraught with incalculable evil to our cause, and must be 
stopped at once. No information which could in any way benefit 
the enemy must be divulged, directb/' o • indirectly. 

Upon the following subjects in particular the strictest silence 
must be observed, viz : 

I. The names of division, brigade, or post commanders. 

3. The strength of regiments, brigades, or divisions. 

d. The number and position of regiments, brigades, divisions, 
batteries, or pieces of artillery. 

4. Allusions to the kind or quantity of arms, cannon, or ammuni- 
tion. 

5. The number of transports or kind of supplies transported in 
any movement. 

6. The description of any movement, or any allusions to its ob- 
jects. 

7. Suggestions of future movenients or attacks. 

8. Any allusions whatever to scouts or reconnaissances, whether 
accomplished or yet in prospect. 

9. The position or location of camps, batteries, pickets, military 
roads, or outposts. 

10. The publication of official reports of operations without special 
permission from the department commander. 

II. Violations of this order will be met with the severest punish- 
ment known to military law and usage in the field. 

By command of Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster : 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 

*See Vol. XXVIII, Part II, p. 40. 
12 R R— VOL XXXV, FT II 



178 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chat. XLVU. 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, July 18, 1864. 
Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron : 
Admiral : I have received one case which I believe contains one 
torpedo clock. I wanted six of them. Please also to send a descrip- 
tion of the manner. of winding them up and setting them to run a 
certain time. I propose to go to Morris Island this evening to try 
these mines, provided the preparations be completed, as I ordered. 
I think it will be necessary to make use of a monitor from which to 
float the rafts down upon the fort. Will you please give the neces- 
sary orders to aid in the enterprise, provided the senior officer there 
has not already that power. I shall leave this evening or to-night. 
Very respectfully, &c., 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Co7nmanding. 



Flag-Steamer Philadelphia, 

Port Royal Harbor, S. C, July 18, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Hdqrs. Hilton Head : 
General : It will soon be necessary to discharge from the Navy 
a considerable number of contrabands at this place, because of the 
expiration of their terms of service. The most of them have not 
served more than a year, and many of them have families in the 
vicinity. Inasmuch as every able-bodied man should be made to 
contribute his due share of service in bearing arms, I should like 
to know whether you have taken any measures in this respect re- 
garding the land service.- I think these people make some calcula- 
tion to escape the full extent of military service, by a partial term 
afloat, and where they are more or less useful, and where they 
may be willing to remain if they find they have to serve somewhere 
for a full term. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Bear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, July 20, 1864. 

Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Asst. Adjt.Gen., Department of the South: 
Captain : I have been informed that the Fifty-fourth and Fifty- 
fifth Regiments Massachusetts Volunteers are soon to be paid at 
the rate of $13 a month, from the 1st of January, 1864, and that 
the question of their pay before that time will also be settled be- 
fore long. I would respectfully request that the major-general 
commanding would give orders to the chief paymaster of this de- 
partment not to settle the clothing accounts of , these two regiments 
on their first payment from January 1, but to have the clothing ac- 
counts deducted from their pay for 1863. The ^leavy fatigue duty 



Chap. XLVU] COKRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 179 

that these regiments have performed has caused their clothing ac- 
counts to be very large, and if deducted from the pay of these four 
montlis will leave but a small balance due. 

I have the hoiioi' to be, your obedient servant, 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding District. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Inland, S. C, July 30, 1864. 
Col. William Gurney, 

Commanding Post, Morris Island : 
Colonel : The general commanding directs that as soon as the 
rebel prison-houses are completed that you increase the strength of 
the outposts on your front, and keep a strong guard in all the forts 
during the night. Also, that during the night you have the boat 
infantry establish a new boat station near the repaired bridge in 
front of Fort Haskell. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. B. DEAN, 
Lieut., VZlth New York Volunteers, A. A. A. G. 



Headquarters District of Florida, 

July ao, 1864. 
Major-General Foster, 

Commanding Departm,ent of the South: 

General : Information reached me yesterday, from a source ap- 
parently reliable (a Mr. Whitely, refugee from Macon, Ga.), that 
900 cavalry were withdrawn from Florida on occasion of your recent 
advance near Charleston. Mr. W. saw them himself at Quitman on 
their way to Charleston. 

Early last week I sent a party around Doctor's Lake, and a few 
miles west of it, which foimd no enemy except a few vedettes. In 
my recent advance up Trout Creek the whole number of the enemy 
did not exceed 75. These facts, with their great quiet in front of 
Jacksonville, led me to change my opinion in regard to their force 
at Baldwin and Camp Milton. The people of Nassau County speak 
confidently of three battalions or regiments at these two places, but 
I must think their number is small. I shall therefore act promptly 
on the permission so kindly accorded me in your favor of the 15th 
ultimo, and make a decided move on the trestle-work in rear of 
Baldwin. With the troops now here T feel that I ought to be able 
to do this. My plan is to land above the mouth of Black Creek, and 
march via Middleburg, by the Clay Hill road, to the Alachua trail. 
At the crossing of the trail and Fernandina railroad, to destroy the 
latter before 10 a. m., so as to prevent the two locomotives from 
Gainesville with the trains from passing up to Baldwin. Then dash- 
ing on with cavalry and one rifled gun, I propose to strike the Lake 
City railroad, at the point where the Alachua trail crosses it, near 
Barber's, and as nearly as possible about 11.30 a.m., the time of 
arrival of tlie Lake City train at Baldwin. The trestle-work near 
Barber's, VZ miles from Baldwin, is '450 yards long and 30 feet high; 



180 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. IChap. XLVIl. 

that at Darby's, 7 miles from Baldwin, is 400 yards long and 30 feet 
high ; that at Deep Creek, 2 miles from Baldwin, is 100 feet long. 
These trestles are guarded, I am told, by a force of boys and old 
men. Our cavalrymen will handle these with ease. I am now get- 
ting ready to move. I shall start on Sunday or Monday. If I suc- 
ceed in destroying the trestle-work, circumstances will determine my 
coiirse. Baldwin, with its six guns, locomotives, and trains, may fall 
into our hands. If I can assault it successfully, I will. Or I may 
move down the Cedar Keys railroad, capturing the two locomotives, 
some hundred horses, and a large number of contrabands. I shall 
go in light marching order, and move quickly on the roads. 

Accept my acknowledgment for your kindness hitherto, and 
believe me, your obedient servant, 

WM. BIRNEY, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters District op Florida, 

Jacksonville, July 30, 1864. 
Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Assistant Adjutant- General : 
Captain : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
favor of the 16th instant. Mine of the 12th instant was written 
when I had fewer troops. Since the order returning the troops to 
their respective districts (an order of which no official copy has been 
sent me) I have troops enough not only for defense but attack. The 
Seventh and Thirty-fifth arrived" safely in due time, and the battery 
got in last night. My clearing up of Nassau County relieves us 
from all fear of torpedoes, nor do I think that the enemy will ever 
attempt to gain possession of any point below Trout Creek (unless 
his force is greatly increased) so long as we have a battery and 
infantry with which to fall upon his rear. 

To the best of my ability I have combatted the apprehensions here 
of the abandonment of Florida, but the people are nervous, having 
been abandoned twice already after promises to the contrary had 
been made them. Our staunchest friends stood everything well 
until the battery was sent off. The i-emoval of that shook their con- 
fidence. When it came back yesterday there was great cheering in 
the town. I mentioli this nervous apprehension of the people as a 
fact the major-general commanding ought to be fully informed of. 
My building a wharf on the opposite side of the river and erection 
of saw-mills will do more to restore their confidence than anything 
else except the sending back of the troops. 

Very truly, your obedient servant, 

WM. BIRNEY, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. District op Florida, Dept. op the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., July 20, 1864. 
Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Asst. Adjt. Gen., Department of the South: 
Captain : I have the pleasure of announcing to the major-general 
commanding that a small party sent out by me has succeeded in 



(3hap. XLVii.) CORR£SP0Ni»ENCfi, EtO. — UNlON. 181 

burning aiid destroying the trestle-work of the Cedar Keys railroad 
at two points about 9 miles south of Baldwin. The Gainesville cars 
were left on the south side of the gap. They can be taken by us at 
our pleasure, together with the two locomotives. 
Very truly, your obedient servant, 

WM. BIRNEY, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters DistiCict of West Florida, 

Barrancas, July 20, 1864. 
Maj. C. T. Christensen, 

Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Div. of West Mississippi: 
Major : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt by steamer 
Clyde of your communication of 17th instant, with the extract of 
General Sherman's dispatch requiring me to look out for his force 
before the 20th or 25th of July. I will start accordingly to-morrow, 
with 1,000 infantry, 2 pieces of artillery, and 50 mounted men, toward 
Pollard, and should I not find the announced force I will strike the 
railroad myself. The steamer Hudson will anchor day after to- 
morrow, the 22d instant, off Pensacola City, loaded with commissary 
stores and forage for Sherman's force. 

I beg to thank the commanding general for the promised cavalry 
horses and the additional regiment of cavalry. They will not lie 
idle, the commanding general may rely upon that. 

I am, very respectfully, major, your obedient servant, 

ASBOTH, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, July 21, 1864. 
Col. James Shaw, Jr., 

Seventh U. S. Colored Troops : 
Colonel : The general commanding directs me to inform you that 
in consequence of the lack of sufficient transportation your marching 
orders are changed. You will be prepared to move with your com- 
mand at a moment's notice at any time after 3 p. m. to-morrow. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

^ ^ M.BAILEY, 

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Flag-Steamer Philadelphia, 

Off Morris Island, S. C, July 22, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Commanding Department of the South : 
General : Your note of the 22d did not reach me until noon, 
about an hour after your departure from this anchorage. There 
seems to have been an entire misapprehension as to any orders from 
me postponing the trial of the powder raft. So far from that about 
6 last night, not observing that the powder was in the raft and ap- 



182 S. C, PLA., and on the QA. coast. [Chap. XLVII. 

prehending delay, I sent an aide expressly to supply any deficiencies 
or arrangements that might be necessary to prevent postponement. 
A copy of the report of the aide is sent herewith. The violent storm 
that rose last evening and continued so long would certainly have 
interfered with the success of the operation. Tliis morning I in- 
tended that, so far as I Avas concerned, nothing should interfere, and 
I sent a tug for one of the lighters to have the powder put in and 
secured against a storm. In return a miessage was received from 
you saying that you would try the experiment from the shore bat- 
teries. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Adinircd, Comdg. South AUantic Blockading Squadron. 

flDclosure.] 

Flag-Steamer Philadelphia, 

Off Charleston, S. C, July 23, 18G4. 
Rear-Admiral .T. A. Dahlgren, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron: 
Sir : In conformity with your instru.ctions, I went on board of the 
Nahant yesterday evening about C to see that everything was ready 
for the explosion of the powder, and also your order to Captain 
Mayo "to use his own discretion," and that you relied entirely upon 
his judgment in the execution of the matter. Captain Mayo decided 
not to go on account of the very bad state of the weather, but he de- 
sired to complete the undertaking as soon as the weather would per- 
mit. I also delivered your order for Captain Mayo to come down as 
soon as the explosion was over, in case he should have gone up, and 
let the regular picket monitor take her station for the night. On 
my return to the flag-ship, I gave a passage to Captain Shelton and 
Acting Ensign Neil to the Cosmopolitan in my boat'. From the fact 
of Captain Mayo deciding not to go, after delivering your order to 
act at discretion, these officers may have been led to believe that I 
brought an order not to make the experiment last night. 
Respectfully, 

E. J. DICHMAN, 
Ensign, U. S. Navy. 



Hdqrs. District oe Florida, Deft, of the South, 

Jacksonville, Jtdy 22, 1864. 
Col. James Shaw, Jr., 

Commanding Seventh U. S. Colored Troops : 

Colonel : The general commanding directs that the following in- 
structions will be observed by you : 

First. Embark your command at 3 p. m. to-day. 

Second. Go up the river so as to arrive at the gun-boat Hale, at the 
mouth of Black Creek, at 7 p. m. 

Third. Land your troops at the landing indicated by Lieutenant 
Burton, aide-de-camp, who will get a pilot for one of the boats. The 
landing is to be made in the quickest possible time from each boat, 
and each boat, as soon as -emptied, will return at quick speed to 
Mandarin to bring up the Seventy-fifth Ohio Volunteers with their 
horses. 



C!hai>. xLvn.) cohrEspondIsnce, Etc. — union. 183 

Fourth. As soon as you have cavalry, the people from all the 
houses from which you suppose spies might go to give information 
to the enemy must be cautioned, under penalty of death, not to 
leave their premises for three days. 

Fifth. The crossings of Black Creek at and above Middleburg 
must be secured and watched, so as to prevent the destruction of the 
bridges. This should be done secretly as possible, the sentinels 
being made to conceal themselves, and the supports must be hidden 
in the bushes or under other cover. 

Sixth. It is desirable that every person, civilian or soldier, man, 
woman, or child, coming within our lines, should be detained in-safe 
custody until after the safe departure of our troops. They should, 
however, be sent to some house or other place where they cannot 
see the number of our troops, which should be kept secret. 

Seventh. A limited number of fires may be built for making 
coffee, keeping off the dew, and drying the men. The places for 
fires should be carefully selected with a view to screening them from 
observation. 

Eighth. The men shall be kept strictly to their bivouac ground. 
Stragglers shall be promptly and severely punished. 

Ninth. Special importance must be attached to the prompt land- 
ing and unloading of the boats. No delay whatever must be allowed. 
If the whole landing is not effected in two nights the surprise can- 
not be effected. 

Tenth. Vigilant guard shall be kept on all approaches to the 
camp. In the event of an attack the ti'oops must not only repel, but 
attack the enemy. 

These instructions may be modified by Colonel Shaw as emergen- 
cies may require. 

By order of Brig. Gen. William Birney, commanding : 

M. BAILEY, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Hdqrs. District of Florida, Dept. op the South, 

Jacksonville, July 22, 1864. 
Lieutenant Purington, 

Acting Assistant Quartermaster: 

Sir: The general commanding directs you to send a boat to 
Picolata to-morrow morning, for the purpose of bringing down all 
refugees and others who are to take part in the raid. You will 
please send the accompanying letter to the commanding officer at 
Picolata. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

M. BAILEY, 
Captain and Assistant Adjutant- General. 

Hdqrs. District op Florida, Dept. op the South, 

Jacksonville, July 22, 1864. 
Commanding Officer, 

Picolata : 
Sir : General Birney directs tKat you embark immediately all the 
refugees and others who are to take part in the expedition. They 
will be landed at Magnolia (Dr. Benedict's place). All will proceed 



184 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVU. 

immediately by the Middleburg road to report to Colonel Shaw, 
Seventh U. S. Colored Troops, who will be between Peter's Creek 
and Middleburg. They must reach Colonel Shaw before to-morrow 
morning. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

M. BAILEY, 
Captain and Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Headquarters District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, July 22, 1864. 

Col. A. L. Harris, 

Commanding Seventy-fifth Ohio Volunteers: 
Colonel : Everything in this expedition depends upon the 
promptness of your embarkation at Mandarin and of your debarka- 
tion. You must have yonr horses ready on the Mandarin wharf, 
your forage and men, and load the boats quickly, and send them off 
as fast as loaded. If you fail in this, from not being ready, or from 
allowing your men to be slow, you will cause my whole expedition 
to fail, for I must land you at night and get the boats. out of the 
creek before daylight, or there will be no surprise. Be ready, then, 
when the boats get to the dock. Get your men and horses on board 
within twenty minutes. 
Very respectfully, 

WM. BIRNEY, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, July 23, 1864. 

Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron : . 

Admiral : I have the honor to inform you that I have now in my 
possession a deserter from the rebel iron-clad Chicora, in Charles- 
ton Harbor. If you desire to examine him, I shall take pleasure 
in placing him at your disposal. With regard to the enemy's iron- 
clads, he corroborates our own observations and former information, 
and states, furthermore, that they have no idea of coming out of the 
harbor, but are only to assist iji preventing the entrance of our fleet. 
In running between Johnson and the city the iron-clads usually 
take advantage of the tide, as they can hardly make headway.' 
against it. The Chicora is three or four hours making the dis- 
tance from Johnson to the city against a heavy tide. With regard 
to the effect of our late operations on James Island, this deserter re- 
ports that Fort Pringle was "very badly used up " by the fire of the 
navy; that the men called it a "slaughter-pen," and could not be 
made to stand to their guns, but took refuge in the bomb-proofs. ■ 

I have the honor to remain, with the highest respect, your obe- 
dient serviant, 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding District. 



Chap. XLVII.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. tlNION. 185 

Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, July 33, 1864. 
Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Assistant Adjutant- General, Dept. of the South : 
Captain : I would respectfully request that another engineer com- 
pany, in addition to Captain McKenna's detachment, he assigned 
for temporary duty in this district. This has become indispensable 
in view of the injury done to our works on Morris Island during the 
present bombardment and the new works ordered bv the major- 
general commanding. There is no officer on Morris Island properly 
qualified to carry on this work. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding District. 



City Point, Va., JvZy 24, 1864—5.30 p. ra. 

(Received 10 a. m., 25th.) 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, Chief of Staff: 

Please direct General Foster to order Brig. Gen. William "Birney 
to report to General Butler, if his services can be dispensed with. 
His brigade might be brought here if General Foster thinks he can 
do without it. Whilst operations continue here much cannot be 
done in the Department of the South except to hold what we have 
got. 

U. S. GRANT, 

Lieutenant- General. 

[Indorsement.] 

July 25, 1864. 
Forwarded to Major-General Foster, commanding Department of 
the South, for his instruction. If General Birney or his origade can 
be spared as indicated. General Foster will so order. 

H. W. HALLECK, 
Major- General, Chief of Staff. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, Jtdy 24, 1864. 
Col. A. S. Hartwell, 

Commanding Post, Folly Island : 
Colonel : The brigadier-general commanding having seen the 
outpost report from Cole's Island for the 22d and 23d of July, directs : 
First. That if the garrison at Battery No. 2 are not able to make 
better practice they be relieved by men that are. Second. That 
after cutting the fuses for shells before firing, fine powder be rubbed 
in and the hole made larger. Third. That on the appearance of the 
enemy's pickets opposite the right on Cole's Island, fire be opened 
upon them from the fort with grape and canister; also that the 
enemy's lookout be cut down by the 30-pounders in position at the 
fort. Fourth. That as soon as the weather becomes again clear and 
dry the fallen trees and brush-wood opposite the right of Cole's Isl- 
and be ignited by shells. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

F. K. SMITH, 
Captain and Aide-de-Camp. 



186 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVII. 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, July 25, 1864. 
Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron: 
■ Admiral : I Iiave the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
letters of the 13th and 18th, in relation to the discharge of a con- 
siderable number of contrabands from the naval service and desir- 
ing that I may take measures to prevent their escaping military 
service on land. In order to carry out your wishes I desire, in all 
discharges from the naval service in this dexjartment, whether con- 
trabands or other persons, where those discharged are not sent North 
in a naval vessel, that those discharged may be. turned over to the 
nearest provost-marshal on shore, and in no case to be suffered to 
^o at large until permitted to do so by my order. I would respect- 
fully ask how it is that these persons' terms of service are of so short 
duration. In the Army we require an enlistment for three years. 
The terms of service ought to be equalized, so as to give no prefer- 
ence in that respect to either branch. At the present time the dis- 
charges of these men, who will make inferior soldiers, from the 
naval service, while we are transferring some of our best soldiers to 
the naval service, operates very much to the prejudice of the army, 
and impairs its efficiency. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major- General, Comm anding. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hiltoti Head, S. C, July 25, 1864. 

Brigadier-General Birney, 

Comm,anding District of Florida: 
General : Upon the receipt of this you will send one regiment 
and four pieces and caissons of the light battery to this place. The 
regiment will bring its knapsacks, shelter-tents, and camp kettles, 
and the officers only one small valise each, for baggage. The four 
pieces and caissons will be fully manned, horsed, and equipped in 
every respect for active service. You will at once come to this place 
to give testimony before a court-martial. 
Respectfully, yours, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, July 25, 1864. 

Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, 

Comdg. Soiitlt. Atlantic Blockading Squadron: 
Admiral : I have the honor to beg that you will place at my dis- 
posal a few clock-work torpedoes. 1 may wish to use these to break 
the booms around Sumter tii connection with the floating mines, and 
also for other pxirposes, and would like to see them work before I 
make requisition for a supply from the North. Allow me to beg that 



Chap. XLVII.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 187 

you will refer the ofificer who hands you this letter to some one who 
may^ve him such information with regard to the working of these 
torpedoes as may be in possession of the navy. 
I have the honor to be, with the highest respect, your obedient 

grtY'V/l TIT 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 

Brigadier- General, Commanding District. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. op the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, July 25, 1864. 
Col. A. S. Hartwell, 

Commanding Post, Folly Island: 
Colonel : In to-day's outpost report from Kiawah Island, the fol- 
lowing occurs : "Rebel pickets were observed through the night, 
opposite rifle-pit B." 

The general commanding directs that you send a reliable officer to 

investigate this matter, tising the picket on Kiawah Island for the 

purpose. He will endeavor to find whether there are any traces of 

the enemy near our front, without going too far from the picket-line. 

I have the honor to be. very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

F. K. SMITH, 
Captain and Aide-de-Camp. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. op the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, July 25, 1864. 

Capt. J. JUNGBLUT, 

Cominanding Rochet Battery: 
Captain : The general commanding directs that j'ou have a de- 
tachment of stands of the Rocket Batteiy in readiness early to-mor- 
row morning, to accompany an expedition to be sent to Legareville. 
The men will be provided with tAvo days' rations. 
By order of Brigadier-General Schimmelfennig : 

W. B. DEAN, 
Lieut., 127tJi New York Vols. Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen. 



Headquarters Department of the South. 

Hilton Head, S. C, July 36, 1864. 

Brigadier-General Schimmelfennig, 

Commanding Northern District: 
General : I desire you to have the Swamp Angel repaired and 
armed with a 30-pounder or 100-pounder Parrott to fire on Fort 
Sumter along the left flank of that work, and thus prevent the 
enemy landing materials at the sally-port on that side, and also 
receiving re-enforcements and supplies. Considerable work is 
needed on the platform and foundation to make it strong enough to 
support the shock of the gun. I also want your report, as soon as it 
can be furnished, of the effect of the firing on Fort Sumter, and of 
the mine rafts, and also your opinion as to the practicability of an 
assault by boats. I also require a report of the attack on Fort John- 
son by boats, and the reason for the failure of such attack. The 
rebel papers speak of Colonel Hoyt's conduct as being very gallant . 
and brave, but state that some of his men ran back to the boats. 



188 S. C., FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XtA^tt. 

They do not refer to the reserve or to any other regiment than Col- 
onel Hoyt's, so that this portion of the force could not have gone 
near enough to attract their attention. The responsibility for lack 
of support to Colonel Hoyt should be made to rest where it belongs. 
Respectfully, yours, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Flag-Steamer Philadelphia, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C, July 26, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Hdqrs. Hilton Head: 
General : Yours of July 35 is just received, and conformably to 
your request I have issued an order that all persons discharged here 
and not sent home shall be turned over to the nearest provost-mar- 
shal to the order of Major-General Foster, the commanding general 
of the Department of the South. In answer to your query, I am 
only able to say that the practice of the Navy Department before 
the rebellion was invariably to ship men for three years, but since 
that shipments have been made for one or for two years, as well as 
for three years. I entirely concur with you, general, that the con- 
ditions of the service in the Army and Navy should be equalized, so 
as not to give any preference in time or in bounty, &c. Had this 
been done there never would have been any necessity for legislating 
transfers of seamen from the Army who had enlisted, because even 
with the long term of three years there were advantages which more 
than balanced the short term of one year in the Navy. I am very 
glad to hear that seamen thus enlisted in the Army have been found 
to make such good soldiers that they cannot be well spared. Still, 
we only get back our old sailors, and that is a gain to the public 
service afloat, though a loss ashore. It is also gratifying to find 
that so many of these men prefer to return to their original voca- 
tion, as the frequent applications show. Herewith I transmit two, 
received whilst writing these lines. 

There have not been, that I am aware of, nor do I expect that there 
will be any discharges here from this squadron, except of contra- 
bands who were obtained here, and whom I do not wish to lose even 
to make inferior soldiers, for they do a great deal of- useful work ; 
but as I have not the power under the naval law to conscript I was 
in hopes that you, being able to do so, would prevent them leaving 
me. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

■j. A. DAHLGREN, 
Bear-Admiral, Comdg. S. Atlantic Blockading Squadron. •" 



July 26, 1864. 

Report on the result of the torpedo operations : 

Captain Smith, Third U. S. Colored Troops, was detailed to select 
a company of men and to drill them in the use of the railway torpe- 
does ; this he neglected to do and has been returned to his regiment. 
On the late expedition Captain Suter detailed Company I, Captain 



Chap. XLVII.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 189 

Edwards, of the Volunteer Engineers, for this duty. Five torpedoes 
were prepared and taken on the expedition ; 3 of these, by order of 
General Hatch, were destroyed, and 3 of them were brought back 
and are now at the engineer depot. Since that time 30 more torpe- 
does have been finished and are now at the depot. 
Respectfully, 

LOUIS FITZGERALD, 
Captain and Aide-de-Camp. 

[Indorsements.] 

July 26, 1864. 
What became of the torpedoes taken by General Birney ? 

J. G. FOSTER. 

Of the 5 torpedoes mentioned within, 4 were taken by General 
Birney and 1 by General Hatch. One of General Birney's and the 
1 of General Hatch were destroyed ; the remaining 3 of General 
Birney's were returned. 
Respectfully, 

LOUIS FITZGERALD, 

Aide-de- Camp. 



Flag-Steamer Philadelphia, 
Port Eoyal Harbor, S. C, July 27, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Hdqrs. Hilton Head: 
General : You may remember that some importance has been 
attached to the passage between Port Royal and Calibogue Sound, 
and I have been written to by yourself and the general of the district 
in regard to its security by water. Last night some examinations of 
the -approaches by water were made by one of my officers without 
being perceived by your pickets. He anchored in a tug some 50 feet 
from Hilton Head Island, near the entrance of Scull Creek, and 
after jjassing entirely around Pinckney Island came through Scull 
Creek, nearly touching the steam-boats at the coal wharf with his 
oars ; he was never once hailed from the shore. I may inform you, 
by the way, that the results of these examinations indicates that 
Scull Creek is tolerably well observed by one of my steamers at each 
outlet, and may be made impassable to the rebels by a battery, &c. 
But Mackay Creek is unguarded, and with water sufficient for rebel 
rams oi' other vessels to pass. I shall order it to be obstructed by a 
boom at its entrance into the Checkhessee River, but as Pinckney 
Island is not occupied by the troops, this may be easily cut loose. 
In order, therefore, to make sure of closing this passage, I would 
suggest that pickets be placed to give notice or hinder any attempt 
of the kind. Some battery should also be placed, because I have 
posted two steamers to watch Scull Creek, and have no others to 
spare. If either are drawn off to where Mackay Creek enters May 
River, Scull Creek will be more or less opened. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Bear-Admiral, Comdg. S, Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



190 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVU. 

[First indorsement.] 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, July 27, 1864. 
Respectfully referred to General Hatch, to inquire into and pun- 
ish the carelessness or neglect of duty of our pickets. 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major- General, Commanding. 

[Second indorsement.] 

Headquarters Hilton Head District, 

Hilton Head, S. C, July 29, 1864. 
Respectfully returned to the major-general commanding, and his 
attention is invited to the accompanying report* of Captain Picker- 
ing, acting assistant inspector-general. 

The return of the armed transports to Scull Creek woixld seem to 
be the only method of increasing security from attack along the 
shores of that stream, as Captain Pickering observes. With the 
small force at our disposal, it is impossible to furnish a complete 
chain of pickets for the whole distance. 

EDWARD E. POTTER, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, July 27, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

CoTumanding Department of the South : 
General : On the 25th instant I sent out to the fleet, requesting 
to be furnished with some clock-work torpedoes. In reply. Captain 
Green, commanding naval forces- before Charleston, informed me 
that he had none and knew nothing about them, but would forward 
ray letter to Admiral Dahlgren at Hilton Head. I require these 
torpedoes to destroy the boom around Sumter, which is found, on 
examination, to exist on the right face, as well as on the right flank 
and gorge ; until the destruction of which no mines can be brought 
properly in contact with tlie fort. I address you on the subject, 
thinking you may be able to obtain these torpedoes for me. 

I have the honor to be, general, your obedient servant, 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding District. 



Office Chief of Artillery, Northern District, 

Department of the South, 
Folly Island, S. C, July 27, 1864. 
Lieut. W. B. Dean, 

Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., Northern Dist., Dejit. of the South: ' 
Sir : I have the honor to report the firing , upon Fort Sumter as 
still continued with good effect. The points against which our fire 

* Not found. 



Chap. XLVII] COKRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 191 

has been directed are, viz : First, the angle formed by the junction 
of sea and gorge walls ; second, the right (enemy's) angle of the 
fort. The first-mentioned point has been much cut away, and, in 
my opinion, is the point against which the whole fire should be di- 
rected. The right angle of the fort has been cut away' for about 8 
or feet. The progress made at this point, however, has been very 
slow. So many of the guns used in breaching have been disabled 
that I have ordered the fire of the remaining guns to be directed 
against the center angle. During this bombardment great incon- 
venience has been experienced from the premature explosion of 
shells, notwithstanding that all the projectiles fired were thoroughly 
examined before being filled, and the fuse plugs well covered with 
white lead previous to being screwed in ; still these premature ex- 
plosions take place. The plan of varnishing the interior surface of 
the shells, as recommended by R. P. Parrott, has not as yet been 
put into practice, owing to there being no varnish in the ordnance 
department. Twelve 30-pounder shells prepared in this way were 
fired without any premature exploisions. This is not a fair trial, 
however, but as soon as varnish arrives from Hilton Head it will be 
more thoroughly tested. 

The following guns have been disabled during the past week: No. 
3 gun (200 Parrott), Fort Putnam, burst July 35 at the 1,300th 
round. No. 4 gun (200-pounder Parrott), Fort Putnam, requires a 
new vent. No. 3 gun (200-pounder Parrott), Battery Chatfield, ditto. 
No. 2 gun, 10-inch columbiad (colored battery), has had about 18 
inches of its muzzle blown off by the premature explosion of a shell. 
This gun is still being fired, and will serve well for short range. 
One new 200-pounder Parrott is being mounted in Fort Putnam to 
replace No. 3 gun, burst. New vents will be placed in the guns re- 
quiring them as soon as material for bushing is received by the ord- 
nance department. 

The only reserve guns on hand in this district are, viz : One 300- 
pounder Parrott, for which there is no carriage or chassis, and one 
100-pounder Parrott complete. There are no smooth-bore guns on 
hand at ordnance yard. . 

The following number of projectiles have been expended in the 
bombardment of Fort Sumter from July 7 to July 31, inclusive : 

Fort Putnam: 764 30-pounders, 1,183 200-pouiiders ; total, 1,947. 

Battery Chatfield: 363 100-pounders, 294 200-pounders, 173 300- 
pounders, 98 10-inch columbiad ; total, 928. 

Fort Strong : 1,146 100-pounders, 142 200-pounders ; total, 1,288. 

Battery Barton : 729 10-inch mortars. 

Battery Seymour : 542 10-inch mortars. 

Thirteen-inch mortar battery : 91 13-inch mortars. 

Number of rounds from each work : Putnam, 1,947 rounds; Chat- 
field, 928 rounds ; Strong, 1,288 rounds ; Barton, 729 rounds ; Sey- 
mour, 542 rounds ; 13-inch mortar, 91 rounds ; total, 5,525. 

Number and kind of projectiles : 764 30-pounders, 1,509 100- 

Eounders, 1,619 200-pounaers, 173 300-pounders, 98 10-incli colum- 
iad, 1,271 10-inch sea-coast mortars, 91 13-inch mortars; total, 5,525. 
Grand total, 5,525 projectiles. 

I remain, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. AMES, 
Lieut. Col. Third Rhode Island Arty., Chief of Artillery, 
^ Northern District, Department of the South. 



192 S. C, FLA.., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

(First indorsement.] 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, July 31, 1864. 
Referred to Lieutenant McGinness for his inforniation. Varnish 
for the shells should be sent to the Northern District. 

J. G. FOSTER. 

[Second indorsement.] 

Ordnance Office, Hdqrs. Dept. of the South, 

Hilton Head, August '6, 1864. 
Respectfully returned. 

As soon as received, Captain Parrott's letter to the major-general 
commanding, recommending that the interior of his shells be coated 
with lacquer or varnish, a copy was made and forwarded through the 
ordnance office, Morris Island, to the chief of artillery Northern Dis- 
trict. An abundance of lacquer has long since been sent to Morris 
Island and the ordnance officer has been directed to send a supply of 
it to the batteries. A portion of the 12 shells herein mentioned 
were varnished by my own hands. I stood over the man until he 
had completed the balance, and I venture to say that had I not done 
so even this small number would not have been tried. Why were 
there not more varnished by the officer commanding the work (Put- 
nam), as plenty of material remained, and give the suggestion a 
fair trial ? I requested the chief of artillery that morning, after I 
had these shells varnished, to have others prepared in the same way, 
using lacquer. I respectfully submit that too little interest is mani- 
fested by the commandants of batteries in the working, care, and 
^management of their guns, and that this fact more than any other 
^accounts for the great number of guns burst at the front. Too 
much is expected of ordnance officers. The 300-pounder was not 
intended to be mounted ; it was sent up to replace the one which 
was then mounted and which has since burst. I have made applica- 
tion to department headquarters for an experienced mechanic to be 
detailed from the engineers for the purpose of rebushing guns when- 
ever they may require it. This was returned disapproved. 

JOHN R. McGINNESS, 
First Lieut, and Chief of Ordnance, Dept. of the South. 

[Third indorsement.] 

August 5, 1864. 
Copy of Lieutenant McGinness' indorsement to be sent to General 
Schimmelfennig, to be furnished to Colonel Ames and the officers 
of the batteries. 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. District of Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, July 27, 1864. 
Col. William H. Noble, 

Commanding U. S. Forces at Baldwin: 

Colonel : In consequence of orders received from departihent 

headquarters directing troops to be sent frorn this district to Hilton 

Head, the expedition to Marion and Alachua Counties is deferred. 

You will retain all the troops you have at Baldwin except the Eighth 



Chap. XLVU.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 193 

Regiment U. S. Colored Troops, which will be sent to this place 
immediately J and you will on no account send out Colonel Harris' 
command as directed by me yesterday. You will receive all your 
supplies at present from Camp Milton. All wagon trains you send 
to that place must be accompanied by a strong escort. General Bir- 
ney has been ordered immediately to Hilton Head to give his testi- 
mony before a general court-martial and will start to-morrow. 
You will therefore be in command of this district. General Birney 
is of opinion that you had better remain at Baldwin for the present. 
By command of Brigadier-General Birney : 

M. BAILEY, 
Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters District op Florida, 

Jacksonville, July 27, 1864. 
Col. William H. Noble, 

Commanding U. S. Forces at Baldwin : 

Colonel : The general commanding directs me to give you the 
following general instructions : 

First. You will build an inclosed work for the defense of Baldwin. 
For this purpose he sends you 50 axes and 200 shovels. Make the 
abatis strong, cutting down the trees in the direction of the enemy's 
advance. 

Second. Destroy as much of the Lake City railroad beyond Bald- 
win as possible. It would be well to send a strong detachment of 
cavalry to the trestle over the south fork of the Saint Mary's, and 
complete the destruction of that work, besides burning all the inter- 
mediate trestle-works. 

Third. The enemy's breast- works toward Jacksonville should be 
entirely destroyed, but you need not Burn the abatis, which is as 
good for us as for them. 

Fourth. Be extremely careful to prevent all information as to 
your numbers getting to any of the country people. Let none of 
them come within your pickets to sell produce or for any other pur- 
pose. If they should penetrate send them under guard to Jackson- 
ville. The family now there must all be sent to Jacksonville. 

Fifth. The troops sent from you should leave some time between 
dusk and daylight, so that the demonstration of your force shall not 
be observed. 

Sixth. The troops falling back should march by the railroad as far 
as camp Milton to avoid the swamps, and thence by the big road. 

Seventh. Direct them to entirely destroy Camp Milton. Those 
that are to come to Jacksonville must not make any very long halts 
for this purpose. They may confine themselves to burning the 
huts and stables, but when Colonel Beecher comes he may halt there 
long enough to destroy all the works. 

Eighth. The Third U. S. Colored Troops will start to-morrow 
morning for Magnolia, and will march by the Bellamy road to the 
railroad to Cedar Keys, opposite Newnansville, which they will 
reach some time on Saturday; they will then probably go down the 
railroad toward Gainesville. The other troops forwarded by you to 
this point will march so as to meet at Gainesville. , I wish Colonel 
Harris, after visiting Starke and Waldo, to strike westward to New- 

13 R R— VOL XXXV, FT II 



194 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVH. 

nansville ; he will use his discretion as to the time of his, joining the 
infantry, but must endeavor to do so on Saturday or Sunday. Tell 
him there is plenty of forage in Alachua and Marion Counties. 

Ninth. I shall occiipy with a force Magnolia and Paldtka, toward 
which points and Baldwin all contrabands can be directed. 

All pillaging must be prevented, but all horses, teams, vehicles, 
and subsistence may be regularly taken. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

M. BAILEY, 
Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, July 27, 1864. 
Col. W. H. Noble, 

Commanding U. S. Forces, Baldivin, Fla. : 
Colonel : I am directed by the general commanding the district 
to call your attention to the necessity of providing first of all against 
any possible surprise by the enemy. They will be immediately re- 
enforced by three companies under Dickison, and also by the avail- 
able troops at Lake City, and may make an attempt to surprise you 
and recover Baldwin. You will therefore see the necessity of attend- 
ing first to closing up thoroughly all the defiles on your front and 
flanks. Your axmen should be sent with a strong escort and good 
guide to fell trees down over all the fords on Brandy Creek, Big 
Ci'eek, the South Fork of the Saint Mary's, the Yellow Water, and 
all other creeks, swamps, and defiles by which the enemy can get at 
you. You have permission to retain 50 of Colonel Harris' men, 
selecting the weakest horses, in order to do your patrol duty in front. 
All the work necessary to protect you against surprise or against a 
sudden advance of the enenty should be attended to first, the forti- 
fications next. These being done, you can attend to other things at 
your leisure. As soon as the avenues in front and flank are blocked 
up, you will have all the trees in front of you cut down that would 
afford slielter to the artillery or skirmishers of the enemy. 

Very respectfully, &c., 

M. BAILEY, 
Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, July 27, 1864. 
Commanding Officer, 

Picolata : 

Sir : You will receive by this an order directing you to proceed to" 
Palatka. Having fulfilled that order, you will by command of the 
general observe carefully the following instructions : 

After you have landed your force you will place the guns in posi- 
tion to guard against attack and send out your patrols to scour 
thoroughly the neighboring country. No patrol should consist of 
less than 15. You will collect all the negroes and refugees in your 
neighborhood, or who come- into your lines, subsisting them upon 
the 500 rations which, will be sent you by this boat. These rations 
should be used as economically as possible. You will drive in and 



Chap. XLVn.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 195 

slaughter what beef -cattle are to be had in your neighborhood, and 
which are necessary to subsist both your own troops and the negroes 
and refugees on fresh beef. You will keep your boats always in 
readiness to land those who come in to you on the ofjposite side of 
the river, if necessary. A force of U. S. troops will march to-mor- 
row from Magnolia to Marion County, proceeding by the Bellamy 
road. All prisoners taken will be carefully guarded until they can be 
forwarded to the provost-marshal here. You will send your patrols 
to scour the coiintry as far as to the point where Orange Creek 
joins the Ocklawaha. Be particularly guarded against any surprise 
from Dickison's rebel cavalry. You will build one comi>iete dock, 
and after that is completed go to work on another, and you will drag 
the river carefully for torpedoes. You will issue stringent orders 
to all your force against pillage of any kind, and see that your orders 
in this regard are carried out to the letter. Any pillaging of houses 
or property or destruction of either or of standing ci'ops will be 
severely punished. This will not interfere with your taking such 
stores as are necessary for subsistence of your men and horses, but 
it must be taken in the regular manner. All the old corn which you 
find yqu will secure, taking such horses and teams as are necessary 
for the purpose, and storing it at Palatka. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, 

■^ . M. BAILEY, 

Captain and Assistant Adjattint- General. 



Hdqrs. District op Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, July "Z7, 1864. 
Capt. J. A. Weiss, 

Seventh U. S. Colored Troops, Commanding at 3Iagnolia: 

Captain : The general directs that you hold yourself in readiness 
to march at a moment's notice with an expedition into the interior. 
Ten days' rations are sent you for that purpose, and your men will 
get no more of any kind until those ten days are over. You will 
therefore caution them to be economical. You will be relieved of 
your command of Magnolia in order that you may accompany this 
expedition. Without further orders, you will report to the com- 
manding officer of the Third U. S. Colored Troops on his arrival and 
accompany him. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

M. BAILEY, 
Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, July 27, 1864. 
Commanding Officer, 

Yellow Bluff: 
Sir : We have taken Baldwin. There is a locomotive and train 
at Callahan, or between there and Baldwin, which you will march 
at once to capture. Take six days' rations with you. Send locomo- 
tive and train to Baldwin. When you have done what you can, gc 
back to Yellow Bluff. 

Very respectfully, 

WM..BIRNEY, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



196 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. ICbap. XLVU. 

Quartermaster-General's Office, 

Washington City, July 28, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Commanding Department of the South, Hilton Head, S. C. : 

General : I have examined the report of Capt. John H. Moore of 
the leth instant, with your indorsement, asking for six light-draught 
steamers, and reporting the condition of the steamers on duty in the 
Department of the South. The Delaware sailed from New York on 
the 26th instant. The Rescue sails from Baltimore to-day. The Isl- 
and City will be ready to sail on the 31st instant. The Planter and 
Philadelphia will be ready in a few days and will be sent to you. 
The Ben De Ford has been under repair. She is expected to be ready 
by August C. She is a large vessel, burning much coal, and requires 
an expensive crew. She is a powerful and excellent steamer, capa- 
ble of rendering most valuable service — one of the best in our service. 
I hesitate to send her back to the Department of the South, where I 
understand she has been idle for- months with fires banked, burning 
out her boilers and doing nothing, kept in waiting for the move- 
ments of the commanding general. She is too expensive and valu- 
able for a yacht. A much smaller and less costly steamer jought 
to serve for the purpose of transportation of a general commanding 
from place to place. The De Ford costs the United States, besides 
coal, $500 a day — $15,000 per month ; at which rate each trip of a 
general officer costs the United States about $20,000. 

I find, by Captain Moore's report that there are twenty-eight steam- 
ers owned and chartered in the service of the United States in the 
Department of the South, and of these he reports only six available 
for outside work, and nearly all in bad condition. I trust that 
under your management of the affairs of the Department of the 
South no such discreditable condition of things will be allowed. If 
these vessels had been properly repaired, with the appliances so 
liberally provided by the quartermaster's department at Hilton Head, 
and when subject to injuries which the shops at that place could not 
repair, had been sent promptly North, they could have been kept in 
serviceable condition and would have been promptly returned. This 
report shows a shiftless management which is most discreditable. I 
hope you will enforce a better rule. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

M. C. MEIGS, 
Quartermaster- General and Brevet Major-General. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Folly Island, S. C, July 28, 1864. 
Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Assistant Adjutant- General, Dept. of the South : 
Captain : I have the honor to report that on the night of the 25th 
to the 26th instant, 1 sergeant and 3 privates of the First South Caro- 
lina Artillery (Companies E and K) deserted from Fort Johnson and, 
crossing the marsh, were picked up by our boat infantry near Paine's 
Dock. In the way of general information they state that the news 
of General Grant's being killed was first given by a deserter from 
our army, and afterward claimed to be extracted from the Northern 
papers. One of them had heard that Grant's army had withdrawn 
from in front of Petersburg. From General Sherman the news of 



Chap. XtVlI.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 197 

the 22d and 33d was that he had been severely repulsed and beaten 
after having attacked Atlanta, and that he had lost several thousand 
prisoners and twenty -two pieces of artillery. No news of interest is 
given with regard to the district. I seem to have about the same 
troops on my front that I had before the late movements on 
James and John's Islands. The deserters state that the fatigue 
parties seen around Johnson and Simkins are not engaged in put- 
ting up any new works, nor inclosing or in any way changing the 
old ones, but merely in carrying on the usual repairs. They also 
state that the enemy are constantly expecting an assault of Fort 
Sumter as well as another attack on Johnson. At Fort Sumter the 
garrison of about 250 men is considered capable of holding it. At 
Fort Johnson five companies of heavy artillery are behind the 
breast-works every night, one to serve the guns, the other four used 
as infantry ; one company of Black's cavalry regiment also reports 
at Fort Johnson for duty every night. 

On Thursday last, the 21st instant, Captain Mitchel, of the First 
South Carolina Artillery, who has for some time past been in com- 
mand of Fort Sumter, was killed by a shell from our batteries. The 
garrison at Fort Sumter is reported not to have been relieved for a 
month past, owing to our heavy bombardment. One of our desert- 
ers was at Fort Pringle during our late operation on Stono, and 
states that the fire of the navy was very destructive. All the heavy 
guns, with the exception of one smooth-bore, were disabled. A 
7-inch rifled Brooke, which they brought there during the action, 
was no sooner placed in position than it was dismounted by our fire. 
The bomb-proof of Pringle proved very poor, our balls penetrating 
to the wood-work. They had heard the loss on James Island esti- 
mated at 200 killed and wounded. Another of the deserters, who 
was at Fort Johnson when we attacked it on the morning of the 3d, 
reports that almost all the troops had been taken away from there 
on the 2d ; that until nearly morning of the 3d there were not more 
than 40 or 50 men in Johnson. About 2 a. m. of the 3d, the two 
companies of the First South Carolina. Artillery, who only had been 
sent as far away as Legar^'s Point, were ordered back to Johnson, 
and arrived in time to repel the attack. Even with these two com- 

Sanies they say there were not more than 200 men, if as many, in 
ohnson and Simkins, and that if our whole force had landed they 
might undoubtedly have taken the two forts. These deserters are 
well fed and clothed, but report that the troops have not been paid 
for the last seven months, and there is much dissatisfaction among 
them. They heard that our general and field officers confined in 
Charleston are in a house at the corner of Broad and Rutledge 
streets, near Chisolm's Mill. 

I have the honor to be, general, your obedient servant, 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding District. 



Hdqrs. District op Florida, Dept. op the South, 

Jacksonville, July 28, 1864. 
Col. William H. Noble, 

Commanding U. S. Forces at Baldwin, Fla. : 
Colonel: No order is necessary to put you in command. As 
senior officer you assume command of all troops serving at the same 
station. The Eighth Regiment must be sent down by the train at 



198 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. (Cbap. XLVII. 

once. I wait for it to go to Hilton Head, to which point Major-Gen- 
eral Foster orders me to send one of my regiments. After that is 
done the locomotive might be sent down to Callahan after the loco- 
motive and train. A previous reconnaissance should be made, how- 
ever, to ascertain the condition of the track, and whether the train 
is there or not, and whether it can be moved. I sent up a company 
yesterday afternoon from Yellow Bluff to go to Callahan ; it will 
probably reach that place to-night. To-day I ordered a reconnais- 
sance from Fernandina as far as Callahan. The company from 
Yellow Bluff has orders to look after the locomotive and train. It 
would be well for you, however, to send down some cavalry to ex- 
amine the track, especially the bridges, and an engineer can run up 
the locomotive. It is possible the rebels may not have injured it at 
all. I attach great importance to closing up thoroughly all the 
defiles and ferries and crossings from the front to your position. 

Baldwin is the key to the possession of Florida, and if the enemy 
can re-enforce he will attempt to retake it. Destroy completely the 
trestle-work over the South Fork of the Saint Mary's. Block up 
with felled trees the fords over Brandy Creek, Big Creek, Yellow 
Water, &c. , leaving but one avenue open to the front, which you 
must have well picketed. Since the order from Hilton Head has 
put an end to all fvirther enterprises for the present, keep all the 
troops, except the Eighth U. S. Colored Troops ; familiarize the 
cavalry with the country and the neighborhood, letting the horses 
and men have rest to prepare them for future movements, which are 
possible after my return from Hilton Head. The fort should be a 
model of strength, and should inclose an excellent well of water. 
Make it impregnable. I think we shall have time to put up a good 
one. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. BIRNEY, 
Brigadier-General, Commanditig. 

P. S. — I shall leave for Hilton Head to-morrow, the 29th instant. 



Hilton Head, S. C, July 28, 1864. 
General Foster-. 

The Wabash goes to sea to-day, leaving the brig containing 
rebel prisoners without protection. Would advise she be moved 
under cover of the guns of the New Hampshire. 

DAHLGREN, 

Admiral. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

HiUo7i Head, S. C, July 29, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, 

Comdg. Conjkderate Forces, Dept. of S. C, Ga., and Fla. : 

General : I have the honor to inform you that the Secretary of 
War has authorized me to exchange any prisoners in my hands, 
rank for rank, or their equivalents ; such exchange being a special 
one. In accordance with the above I send Major Anderson to make 
arrangements as to time and place for the exchange. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major- General, Commanding. 



Chap. XLVH.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION, 199 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, July 29, 1864. 
General Wessells : 

My Dear General : I have just received authority to exchange 
the prisoners in my hands, rank for rank, or their equivalents, ac- 
cording to the cartel. I send an aide-de-camp to make arrange- 
ments for the exchange. 
Yours, truly, 

J. G. FOSTER. 



Headquarters District op Florida, 

Jacksonville, July 29, 1864. 
Lieut. Col. U. Doubleday, 

Commanding TJiird U. S. Colored Troops: 

Colonel : I am directed by the brigadier-general commanding 
to give you the following instructions for your guidance at Palatka : 

First. Build a strong inclosed earth-work, with good abatis, with 
well inside, and large enough to accommodate 300 men conveniently. 

Second. Patrol with strong parties, and with cavalry as far as Or- 
ange Creek, near the site of old Fort Brooke. If you find that there 
is no force of the enemy in that quarter you might push as far as 
Silver Springs, or even Ocala, taking care to seize upon the Ockla- 
waha bridges near Silver Springs in order to secure a retreat by way 
of Fort Gates or Volusia. 

Third. When you have cleared the rebels from your front, or 
found there are none, send a party in the Hattie or in boats to the 
Ocklawaha, and up that stream as far as safe, to cut away the trees 
felled over it, to seize on the Silver Springs a steamboat on that 
river, and to take possession of all lighters, ferry-boats, wherries, 
dugouts, and other craft of every description. 

Fourth. Make inquiries of the whereabouts of .the light-house 
lenses taken by the rebels at the beginning of the war and stored 
somewhere between Palatka and the town of Ocala. They are worth 
some $50,000. 

Fifth. Get all the contrabands, horses, and all other lawful prizes 
of war, including mules, wagons, cotton, &c., making a full report 
of property taken and giving proper receipts for the same. 

These instructions are for your genei-al guidance, but may be 
modified by you according to the exigencies of your position. 
Very respectfully, &c. , 

WM. BAILEY, 
Captain and Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Hdqrs. District of Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, July 29, 1864. 
Col. William H. Noble, 

Commanding U. S. Forces at Baldwin, Fla. : 
Colonel : In obedience to orders, I leave for Hilton Head at 12 
o'clock. You will be in command. The force you left at Picolata 
I have ordered to Palatka. I.shall re- enforce them to-day with 300 
men from the Third U. S. Colored Troops, under command of Col. 
U. Doubleday, also with Captain Morton's cavalry. Captain Weiss 



200 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVU. 

is at Magnolia with his company and a detachment of convalescents, 
with instructions to make a strong camp. The kind of works built 
by the rebels is the best for Baldwin — logs, covered with earth. You 
might use for the purpose the logs taken from their works. Save 
all the planks for platforms, &c. I shall return as soon as possible, 
very truly, your obedient servant, 

WM. BIRNEY, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, July 30, 1864 
Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Present : 
I have the honor to request the loan of six lOO-pounder Par- 
rott guns, to be placed in a new battery erected on Cumming's Point. 
I also beg leave to say that I will avail myself of your offer of some 
9-inch guns for the battery at Spanish Wells, and will send for them 
in a day or two. I shall be obliged to borrow of you the ammunition 
for these guns, as we have none. 

Respectfully and truly, yours, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, July 30, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. Samuel, Jones, 

Comdg. Confederate Forces, S. C, Ga.,andFla., Charleston, S. C. : 
■ General : I have the honor to transmit herewith an official copy of 
General Orders, No. 190, from Adjutant-General's Office, dated Wash- 
ington, D. C, May 3, 1864, and would respectfully invite your par- 
ticular attention to section 127, page 4, which relates to the princi- 
ple recognized in regard to holding medical officers and chaplains 
as prisoners of war.* I respectfully ask to be informed as soon as 
practicable of your decision regarding the return of Dr. W. T. 
Robinson, One hundred and fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers, as re- 
quested by me in communication to you bearing date of July 7, 1864. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, Jidy 30, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. E. E. Potter, 

Beaufort : 
The major-general commanding directs that the Twenty-ninth 
Regiment Connecticut Volunteers, the Ninth, Twenty-sixth, Thirty- 

*Full order will appear in Series 11. The section specially mentioned is as fol- 
lows : " The principle being recognized tliat medical officers and chaplains should 
not be held as prisoners of war, all medical officers and chaplains so held by the 
United States will be immediately and miconditionally discharged." 



Chap. XLVII.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 201 

fourth, and One hundred and second Regiments U. S. Colored 
Troops hold themselves in readiness to embark at once. Transports 
will be sent as soon as possible, and the troops must embark so as to 
be at Hilton Head before dusk to-morrow evening. Fifteen days' 
rations will be put on each transport in bulk. The men will carry 
three days' rations in haversacks, and one pair of socks only in their 
knapsacks, together with a rubber blanket, if they have one ; if not, 
a woolen blanket or an overcoat. Nothing else must be allowed in 
either. The officers will be allowed one small hand-bag each for 
their baggage only. The senior officer of these troops will have 
command of the brigade, and will receive sealed orders from these 
headquarters, where he will report immediately on his arrival at 
this place. The troops to be well supplied with ammunition. 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, July 30, 1864. 

Commanding Officer, Eighth U. S. Colored Troops : 

Sir : The major-general commanding directs that you have your 
command on board the steamer designated by the chief quarter- 
master, Capt. John H. Moore, immediately, and that when all are 
on board you haul off into the stream and await further orders, 
which will be sent on board to you this p. m. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

THOMAS J. ROBINSON, 
First Lieut., Twenty-first U. S. Colored Troops, A. A. A. G. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, July 30, 1864. 
Major-General Foster: 

General : In compliance with your request I would name the 
following five regiments: Twenty-ninth Connecticut Volunteers 
(colored), Ninth U. S. Colored Troons, Twenty-sixth U. S. Colored 
Troops, Thirty-fourth U. S. Colored Troops, One hundred and sec- 
ond U. S. Colored Troops. These, with my present force, ought to 
be able to accomplish what is needed in Florida, to take all south of 
the Santa F^. 

Verv truly, your obedient servant, 

^ '^ WM. BIRNEY, 

Brigadier-General, Commanding District of Florida. 



Flag-Steamer Philadelphia, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C, July 31, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Headquarters Hilton Head: 
General : Conformable to your request, six 100-pounder Parrotts 
will be loaned to you, and are at your disposal when it suits your 
■convenience to send for them. I expected to have obtained the 



202 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. (Chap. XLVII. 

9-inch guns from the Wabash, but she has left this port, and I have 
required on the Bureau for some. Wlien they arrive I shall be glad 
to meet your wishes, 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, July 31, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. E. E. Potter, 

Commanding District of Beaufort: 
General : The major-general commanding directs that the Ninth 
U. S. Colored Troops be prepared to embark within three days, with 
all their camp and garrison equipage. The Thirty-fourth U. S. Col- 
ored Troops to be prepared to move within twenty-four hours, with 
all their camp and garrison equipage, and to embark as soon as 
transportation arrives at Beaufort, proceeding at once to Hilton 
Head, when the commanding officer will report at these headquarters 
for sealed orders. The One hundred and second U. S. Colored Troops 
to be prepared to move within twenty-four hours in light marching 
order, with three days' rations. The knapsacks and haversacks to 
contain nothing but rations and one pair of socks, with rubber 
blankets, if they have them ; if not, woolen blankets or overcoats. 
They will all carry 30 rounds of ammunition extra. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, July 31, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. William Birney, 

Comdg. District of Florida, Jacksonville, Fla. : 

General : I am directed by the major-general commanding to 
state that, in accordance with instructions received from the General- 
in-Chief, U. S. Armv, you are ordered to report at once to Major- 
General Butler, at I^ort Monroe, Va. , and will take with you your 
brigade, consisting of four regiments of colored troops. The Seventh, 
Eighth, and Ninth U. S. Colored Troops, belonging to your brigade, 
you will embark the Seventh and Eighth and proceed with them to 
this place, where they will be re-embarked on sea transportation. 

The major-general commanding desires you to select the fourth 
regiment from the Twenty -sixth U. S. Colored Troops or the Twenty- 
ninth Connecticut Volunteers. 

The major-general commanding further directs that you re-era- 
bark at once, and proceed with all possible dispatch. The Ninth 
U. S. Colored troops has been ordered to be ready to embark. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Captain and Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Chap. XLVU.] 



COREESPONDENCE, ETC. — TTNION. 



203 



"General Orders, ) Hdqes. Department of the South, 

No. 113. f Hilton Head, S. C.,July 31, 1804. 

In accordance with instructions received from the General-in- 
Chief of the U. S. Army, Brig. Gen. William Birney, U. S. Volunteers, 
is hereby relieved from duty in this department, and will report 
without delay to Major-General Butlei;, at Fortress Monroe, Va. 

Brig. Gen. John P. Hatch, U. S. Volunteers, is hereby assigned to 
the command of the District of Florida, and will relieve Brigadier- 
General Birney at once. 

Brig. Gen. E. E. Potter, U. S. Volunteers, is herebv assigned to 
the command of the District of Hilton Head, and will relieve Brig- 
adier-General Hatch without delay. During the temporary absence 
of Brig. Gen. R. Saxton, Brigadier-General Potter will retain com- 
mand of the District of Beaufort, in addition to that of Hilton Head. 

By command of Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster : 

W.L. M. BURGER, 
A ssistant A djutan t- General. 



Headquarters District op Florida, 

Jacksonville, July 31, 1864. 
Captain Morton, 

Comdg. Battalion Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry : 
Captain : You will embark with 50 men and horses of your com- 
mand to-day at 10 o'clock and proceed immediately to Palatka. 
Your men will be provided with five days' rations and five days' 
forage for their horses. The quartermaster will designate the boat 
to be used by you. It is essential that all your horses and men, pro- 
visions, and forage should be on board by 10 p. m. Your men 
will of course move in light marching order. You will please re- 
port at these headquarters as soon as possible. 
Very respectfully, vour obedient servant, 

M. BAILEY, 
Captain and Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Abstract from, return of the Department of the South, Maj. Oen. John O. Foster 
commanding, for July, 1864. 



Command. 



General headquarters 

Hilton Head District (Hatch) 

District of Beaufort (Potter) 

District of Florida (Birney) 

Northern District (Scliimmelfennig) 

Total 



Present for 
duty. 



95 
2,450 
3,474 
3,147 
5, .5.33 



14,699 



154 
3,560 
4,919 
3,918 
6,924 



19,505 



"■2 



154 

4,778 
5,316 
5,097 
7,894 



Pieces of ar- 
tillery. 



(o) 

25 

(a) 



(a) 
(a) 



a Number of guns omitted from district returns. 



204 S. C, FLA., And ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

Troops in the Deimrtment of the South, Maj. Gen. John O. Foster, 
U. S. Army, commanding, July 31, 1864. 

HILTON HEAD DISTRICT. 
Brig. Gen. John P. Hatch. 

41st New York, Lieut. Col. Detleo von Elnsiedel. 
144th New York, Col. WiUiam J. Slidell. 
157th New York, Lieut. Col. James C. Carmichael. 
25th Ohio, Lieut. Col. Nathaniel Haughton. 
104th Pennsylvania, Lieut. Col. Thompson D. Hart. 

2d Battalion 4th Massachusetts Cavalry, Capt. George 'R. Hurlbut. 

3d Rhode Island Heavy Artillery (four companies), Maj. James E. Bailey. 

3d Rhode Island Heavy Artillery (one company), Lieut. George W. Greene. 

2d U. S. Colored Light ArtUlery, Battery G, Lieut. Jacob Gray. 
Battalion 1st New York Engineers, Maj. Jamas E. Place. 
U. S. Veteran Reserve Corps (detachment), Lieut. Alexander Cameron. 

DISTRICT OF FLORIDA. 
Brig. Gen. William Birney. 

17th Connecticut, Col. William H. Noble. 
75th Ohio, Col. AJidrew L. Harris. 
107th Ohio, Maj. Augustus Vignos. 

3d U. S. Colored Troops, Lieut. Col. Ulysses Doubleday. 

7th U. S. Colored Troops, Col. James Shaw, jr. 

8th U. S. Colored Troops, Maj. Edelmiro Mayer. 
35th U. S. Colored Troops, Col. James C Beecher. 

4th Massachusetts Cavalry (detachment), Capt. Joseph W. Morton. 

3d Rhode Island Artillery, Light Battery A, Capt. William H. Hamner. 

DISTRICT OF BEAUFORT. 
Brig. Gen. Edward E. Potter. 

29th Connecticut (colored), Col. William B. Wooster. 
56th New York, Col. Charles H. Van Wyck. 

9th U. S. Colored Troops, Lieut. Col. Samuel C. Armstrong. 
36th U. S. Colored Troops, Col. William Sillimau. 
34th U. S. Colored Troops, Col. James Montgomery. 
102d U. S. Colored Troops, Col. Henry L. Chipman. 

3d New York Light Artillery, Battery F, Capt. Samuel C. Day. 

NORTHERN DISTRICT. 
Brig. Gen. Alexander ScHiHMELFENNia. 

POLLY ISLAND. 

Col. Alfred S. Hartwell. 

55th Massachusetts (colored), Lieut. Col. Charles B. Fox. 
54th New York, Col. Eugene A. Kozlay. 
103d New York, Lieut. Col. Andrew Wettstein. 
74th Pennsylvania, Lieut. Col. Alexander von Mitzel. 
33d U. S. Colored Troops, Lieut. Col. James D. Strong. 
1st New York Engineers, Company G, Capt. Charles P. McKenna. 

MORRIS ISLAND. 

Col. William Gurney. 

54th Massachusetts (colored), Col. Edward N. Hallowell. 
127th New York, Capt. James W. Gurney. 
52d Pennsylvania, Maj. Thomas B.Jayne. 
21st U. S. Colored Troops,. Capt. Richard H. Willoughby. 
32d U. S. Colored Troops, Lieut. Col. Edward C.Geary. 

3d New York Light Artillery, Battery B, Lieut. Edward A. Wildt. 

3d Rhode Island Heavy Artillery, 2d Battalion, Maj. George Metcalf. 



Chap. XLT?U.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 205 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 1, 1864. 

Rear- Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, 

Comdg. S. Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Port Royal, S. C. : 

Admiral : I have the honor to inform you that 91 men from the 
Navy were landed at this place last evening with permission to 
remain on shore one week. I inclose a copy of one of said passes. 
Your letter to me of 26th ultimo states that all persons discharged 
f ronj the Navy and not sent home will be turned over to the nearest 
provost-marshal, subject to my orders. I have given instructions 
that all such men shall be conscripted at once in the U. S. Army as 
a military necessity. I therefore respectfully request to be informed 
if I am to consider the men landed last night from the Navy as dis- 
charged or on leave. The latter clause of the pass leads me to sup- 
pose that these men were discharged, as it seems to be optional with 
the men to return or not. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 1, 1864. 

Rear- Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron : 
Admiral : I have the honor to inform you that the Government 
has given me authority to exchange the rebel prisoners of war in this 
department for those of our officers confined in Charleston. Ar- 
rangements have been made to make the exchange in Charleston 
Harbor, between Fort Moultrie and Battery Putnam, at 10 o'clock 
on Wednesday morning. Will you please inform the senior officer 
off Charleston of the fact ? 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

^ ^ J. G. FOSTER, 

Major-General, Commanding. 



Flag-Steamer Philadelphia, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C, August 1, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Hdqrs. Hilton Head, S. C. : 
General : With deep and sincere pleasure I learn from your note 
that our exchange has been authorized, which will restore to us our 
gallant officers so cruellv exposed in Charleston. It will give me 
pleasure to convey them from Charleston to Port Royal on board the 
Pawnee, if perfectly agreeable to yourself and to them. Captain 
Green, the senior officer off Charleston, will be so instructed, and 
also to offer any of the light steamers and boats that may be needed 
for their reception. Captain Green will be directed also to fire a 
salute from the Pawnee as soon as our officers are landed on our 
decks. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 
^ J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear-Admiral, Comdg. S. Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



206 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVII. 

U. S. Ship Vermont, 
Port Royal, August 1, 1864. 
Lieut. Gol. James F. Hall, 

Frovost-Uarshal-General, Dept. of the South : 
Sir : I send on shore contrabands heretofore serving in tlie squad- 
ron and now discharged. If they return to their ship in a week I 
wish to resliip them. Will you please give them passes for a week, 
and allow them to return to us should they desire to do so ? I will 
be obliged if you will apprise General Foster that these contrabands 
have been landed. * 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. REYNOLDS, 
Commanding Naval Depot. 

[Indorsements.] 

Respectfully forwarded to the commanding genei-al. 

JAMES F. HALL, 
Lieut. Col. and Provost-Marshal-General. 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 2, 1864. 
If these men are allowed to come on shore, I wish it may either be 
as discharged men or as men on furlough. To have them sent with 
the condition that if they do not return on board at a certain time 
they will be liable to be taken by the Army is not agreeable to this 
branch of the service. 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major- General, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Morris Island, S. C, August I, 1864. 
Maj. Gen.' J. G. Poster, 

Commanding Department of the South: 
General : I have the honor to report that I am sufficiently 
advanced in the matter of tlie mines to be able to apply them within 
two or three days. Admiral Dahlgren has very kindly sent an offi- 
cer of his staff to explain to me the use of the clock-work torpedoes, 
and -has placed a number of them at my disposal. These I am about 
to use to destroy the boom. 

It appears to me that looking at Sumtei- a considerable breach has 
been made in the two faces of the fort, especially the left face. I 
propose sending a party around the fort with the view of ascertain- 
ing the amount of damnge done to these walls. The work on the 
Swamp Angel will soon be finished. I have been moving my head- 
quarters to Morris Island, and have been prevented on that accogiit 
from making out a report of the attack on Fort Johnson. 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Morris Island, S. C, August 1, 1864. 
Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Assistant Adjutarit-General, Dept. of the South : 
Captain : I have the honor to call the attention of the major-gen- 
eral commanding to the fact that while our rifled guns have done 



Chap. XLVII.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.— UNION. 207 

excellent service iu effecting a breach in the walls of Sumter, they 
are not as effective in clearing away the debris and combing down 
the slope as the largest-sized smooth-bore guns would be. I have 
understood that 11 and 15 inch Dahlgren guns can be obtained from 
the navy, and would respectfully i-equest that four or six of these 
may be sent here for use against Sumter. 

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant, 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding District. 

[Indorsement.] 

File. Action has been taken. 

J. G. F. 



Hdqks. Northern District,* Dept. of the South, 

Morris Island, S. C, August 1, 1864. 
Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., Dept. of the South: 
Captain : I have the honor to report that nothing of importance 
has occurred in this command since the last visit of the majdr-gen- 
eral commanding. The firing into the city and the bombardment of 
Fort Sumter have been continued as ordered, the particulars of 
which will be found in the report, herewith inclosed, of Lieutenant- 
Colonel Ames, chief of artillery of the district. 

The enemy replies to our fire occasionally from his works on James 
and Sullivan's Islands. The enemy's fatigue parties still show them- 
selves around Fort Johnson, Battery Simkins, and the works around 
Secession viile. 
I am moving the headquarters of this district to Morris Island. 
I have the honor to be, your obedient servant, 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding District. 

[Inclosure.] 

Office Chief of Artillery, 

Morris Island, S. C, August 1, 1864. 

Lieut. W. B. Dean, 

A. A. A. G., Hdqrs. Northern Dist., Dept. of the South: 

Sir : I have the honor to state that since my last report of July 
22, the firing upon Fort Sumter has been continued. The fire from 
guns of Fort Putnam has been directed at a point on the gorge wall 
to the left of the old breach. The fire from Battery Chatfield has 
been directed at the center of the sea-wall. This change in the 
point against which the fire was directed was made in accordance 
with orders from department headquarters. The breach in gorge 
wall has been cut or combed off for about 7 feet. The sea-wall has 
been cut down for about 5 feet. The breach, however, is not yet 
practicable. 

On July 30, No. 4 gun. Fort Putnam (200-pounder Parrott), was 
disabled, a crack appearing on right upper quarter of gun and ex- 
tending from under re-enforce to left trunnion. This gun has fired 
573 rounds. August 1, No. 4 piece, Battery Chatfield ,(300-pounder), 
was disabled, about 24 inches of muzzle being blown off. This gun 
has fired 1,200 rounds. The carriage was not injured, so that the 



208 S. C, VLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVU. 

reserve 300-pounder can be at once mounted in its place. There are, 
with the exception of 30-pounder Parrotts, no reserve guns on hand 
at ordnance yard. 

The following are the breaching guns in works at the front that 
bear on Fort Sumter, viz : 

Fort Putnam, one 300-pounder Parrott, serviceable; two 30- 
pounder Parrotts, no projectiles. 

Battery Chatfiel(J, one 200-pounder Parrott, vent closed; one 100- 
pounder Parrott, vent closed. 

Columbiad battery, two lOO-pounder columbiads ; no projectiles. 

This leaves only one breaching gun in works at front that can be 
used to-day on Fort Sumter. 

Since July 21 the following number of projectiles have been fired 
at Fort Sumter, viz : 

From Fort Putnam : , 

200-pomider shells 497 

30-pounder shells 854 

Battery Chatfield : 

300-pounder shells 362 

lOO-pounder shells 353 

Battery Barton, lO-inch mortar shells 557 

Battery Seymour, 10-inch mortar sheUs 392 

Columbiad battery, 10-inch columbiad shells 266 

13-inch mortar battery, 13-inch mortar shells 52 

300-pounder Parrott shells 362 

300-pounder Parrott shells 479 

lOO-pounder Parrott shells 353 

30-pounder Parrott shells 854 

13-inch mortar shells 52 

lO-inch mortar shells 949 

10-inch columbiad shells 266 

Total 3, 333 

Very respectfully, sir, your obedient servant, 

WM. AMES, 
Lieut. Col. Third R. I. Arty., Chief of Artillery, 

Northern District, Dept. of the South. 



Jacksonville, August 1, 1864. 
Major-General Foster, 

Commanding Department of the South: 
General : 'Since asking the five regiments only, I have learned 
that their number for duty is much smaller than I had anticipated. 
My sick-list at Baldwin has also swelled. I would therefore re- 
quest that you send one more regiment to me. I would prefer a 
black one, as nearly all my troops are colored. 
Very truly, yours, 

WM. BIRNEY, .: 
Brigadier-General, Conimanding. 



Headquarters District op Florida, 

Jacksonville, August 1, 1864. 
Colonel Doubled AY, 

Commanding Third U. S. Colored Troops: 
Colonel: General Birney directs you to proceed immediately 
with 300 men of your command to Camp Milton. The men will 



Chap. XLVII.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 209 

carry shelter- tents and six days' rations. You will encamp your 
men somewhere on the line of the railroad between Camp Milton 
and the first trestle this side of Camp Milton, near enough to the 
trestle to guard it from the enemy. You will first of all intrench 
yourself, making your position as strong as possible. After this is 
done you can turn your attention to destroying the enemy's line of 
fortifications. 

You are sent to Camp Milton for the purpose of preventing the 
enemy from damaging the railroad. You will send out frequently 
scouting parties to make sure that the country is free from the scat- 
tering parties of the rebels, 
very respectfully, &c., 

M. BAILEY, 
Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Hdqrs. District of Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, August 1, 1864. 
Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Asst. Adjt. Gen., Department of the Sotdh: 
Captain : I have the honor to report that the force under my com- 
mand have cai)tured 2 large and valuable lighters at Palatka and a 
locomotive and 7 cars (4 box and 3 platform cars) near Callahan 
Station, on the railroad between Baldwin and Fernandina. The 
cars are in good condition. The locomotive, although temporarily 
disabled, can in a short time be put in good running order. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. BIRNEY, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding^ 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 2, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, Chief of Staff, Washington, D. C. : 

General : I have the honoi- to acknowledge the receipt of your 
order of the 25th ultimo, accompanying the telegraphic order from 
General Grant of the 24th ultimo. I have at once made arrange- 
ments to comply with it. Brigadier-General Birney has been ordered 
to proceed at once to Fort Monroe, Va., and report to Maj. Gen. 
Benjamin F. Butler with his brigade. This brigade only contained 
three regiments, the Seventh, Eighth, and Ninth U. S. Colored 
Troops, but in order to make it full I have added another regiment. 
This will make the strength, of the brigade over 3,500 men, or over 
2,500 eflEectives. The regiments are good, and only require a littl'e 
more drill and service to make them first-rate. I would just as soon 
send the same number of white regiments, as these latter are sooner 
broken down with the heat and sickness in this climate. I thought 
it better, however, to send the regiments belonging to General Bir- 
ney's brigade and consisting mainly of regiments raised by him. 
The transportation is all ready, and as soon as General Birnej"^ and 
two of his regiments can be brought from Florida the whole will 
sail for Fort Monroe and arrive as soon as this letter. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



210 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 2, 1864. 
Rear-Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Present : 
Admiral : I have received your letter of the 1st, and thank you 
for your kind offer of the Pawnee to bring them to Port Royal. I 
think it will be better, however, to bring them down on the Cosmo- 
politan, which has ample accommodations. I will thank you for 
your kind intentions of a salute from the Pawnee guns, which will 
be a handsome compliment to our brave officers. I will order the 
Cosmopolitan, as soon as she gets our officers on board, to hoist her 
flags, and, with band playing, to round to under the stern of the 
Pawnee while the salute is being fired. After returning thanks for 
the compliment to the captain of the Pawnee, the Cosmopolitan will 
steam for this harbor. Fort Welles will salute as it enters. 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-Oeneral, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. Dept. of S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 

Charleston, S. C, August 2, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Comdg. U. S. Forces, Dept. of the South, Hilton Head : 

General : I received your letter of the 29th ultimo, infornqing 
me that the Secretary of War had authorized you to exchange any 
prisoners in your hands, rank for rank, or their equivalents, such 
exchange being a special one ; and that you had sent Major Ander- 
son to make arrangements as to time and place for the exchange. 
Major Lay, of my staff, whose authority to act I had previously 
made known to you, and who met Major Anderson at Port Royal 
Ferry, reports to me that he and Major Anderson had agreed to make 
the exchange to-morrow morning in the north channel leading to 
Charleston Harbor. Having received authority from my Govern- 
ment to make the exchange, I will send 5 generals and 45 field officers 
of the U. S. service on a steamer for exchange at the time and place 
appointed. The details as to equivalents will be settled between 
Majors Lay and Anderson, or any other officer to whom you may 
assign that duty, and any balance that may be found due you will 
be forwarded in officers by flag of truce, as agreed upon. 

On your assurance conveyed in your letter of the 16th ultimo, that 
Assistant Surgeon Robinson, of the One hundred and fourth Penn- 
sylvania Regiment, was not, when captured, recounoiteriug, I will 
release and send him within your lines as soon as it can be done. He 
had been sent from here before I received your letter in regard to 
him. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

SAM. JONES, 
Major- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Boat Infantry, 

Morris Island, S. C, August 2, 1864. 
Lieut. E. W. Schauffler, Aide-de-Camp : 

Lieutenant : I have the honor to report that, in compliance with 
orders from the general commanding, three boats went entirely 



Chap. XLVII.) 



COKRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 



211 



around Sumtei" this evening. The following boats were the three, 
viz: First boat. Captain Allison and Lieutenant Eaton, with ten oars; 
second boat. Lieutenant Little and Lieutenant Prowley, with five 
oars ; third boat. Captain Long and Ensign C. C. Neil, tj. S. Navy, 
eight oars. 

We left Paine's Dock at 7.30 p. m., and Gregg at about 8 p. m., 
passing between Sumter and Johnson hear the second telegraph pole. 
From this point we could see tlie left flank and the dock. Upon the 
docks there was a lantern, also a sentry. On this face there are nine 
casemates, through which the light could be plainly seen. Drifting 
with the tide past the left face we could see no signs of life. Pass- 
ing the right face we could see three casemates, through which the 
light showed very plainly, also glimmering of light through several 
others. 

There was at the base of this -face, where it flanks the right flank, 
a lantern, rather dim ; supposed to be a signal lantern for their boats. 
While turning the left flank could see the three rams, one of which 
was moving down showing a bright light. We met with no obstacle 
during the reconnaissance, owing probably to our getting around the 
fort before the rams had gained their position and thrown out their 
boats. 

I have the honor to inclose a draft of the fort, showing the outlines 
of the walls as seen from the boats. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

RICHARD ALLISON, 
Captain, 127th New York Infantry, Comdg. Boat Infantry. 



FORT SUMTER. 




P 



Gorge wall. 



212 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVU. 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August a, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. J. P. Hatch, 

Commanding District of Hilton Head : 
General . The major-general commanding directs that the best 
band now at this post be ordered on board tlie Cosmopolitan this p. 
m., at 5.30 o'clock, with three days' rations. They accompany the 
officer designated to exchange our prisoners of war at Charleston. 
I am further instructed to direct that the commanding officer at 
Fort Welles be ordered to report to these headquarters immediately 
to receive instructions regarding the firing of a salute on the arrival 
of the Cosmopolitan. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

THOMAS J. ROBINSON, 
First Lieut., 21st U. S. Colored Troops, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 2, 1864. 
Col. H. L. Chipman, 

Comdg. 102d U. S. Colored Troops, Steamer Canonicus: 
The major-general commanding directs that you proceed at once 
to Jacksonville, Fla., with your command, and report to Brig. Gen. 
John P. Hatch, commanding Disti-ict of Florida. 
Very respectfully, vour obedient servant, 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 3, 1864. 
Maj. George M. Dennett, 

Commanding Ninth U. S. Colored Troops: 
Major : The major-genei'al commanding directs that you proceed 
with your command, now on board steamer Fulton, to Fortress 
Monroe, and report to Maj. Gen. B. F. Butler, commanding Depart- 
ment of Virginia and North Carolina, as being one of the regiments 
composing Brig. Gen. William Birney's brigade, now under orders 
for tliat point. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your' most obedient 
servant, 

THOMAS J. ROBINSON, 
First Lieut., 21st U. S. Colored Troops, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 4, 1864. 
Maj. Gen.- H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff, Washington, D. C. : 
General : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
letter of the 12th [ultimo], authorizing me to exchange the prisoners 
of war now in my hands, and to report that I made such exchange 
yesterday in Charleston Harbor, and that our released officers, com- 
prising 5 general and 45 field officers, will proceed North on the 
steamer Fnltou, under command of Brigadier-General Wessells, 



Chap. XLVU] COERESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 213 

who has orders to report to the Adjutant-General of the Ariay 
from Fort Monroe, and also from New York, if no orders are re- 
ceived before their arrival in the latter city. Three line officers that 
escaped from the railroad train en route to Charleston are sent 
with tlie other officers. . 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 4, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff, Washington, D. C. : 

General : The information given by oar prisoners of war, now 
liberated, and by deserters, also by the late rebel papers, represent 
that our soldiers now prisoners at Andersonville, Ga., are destitute 
of comforts and necessaries, and are rapidly dying. The number of 
deaths per day varies, according to reports, from 30 to 70. 1 do not 
know what the wishes of the Government may be, but if it desire 
that our imprisoned soldiers may be exchanged, so as to relieve them 
from their distress, I can easily have the matter arranged with the 
Confederate authorities so as to effect an exchange here. The ex- 
change can be made by way of the Savannah River, and we can 
easily arrange to guard any numberof prisoners on our islands here, 
and to supply them at least as bountifully as our men are supplied 
that are in the hands of the enemy. 

I think the Confederate authorities are very desirous to have an 
exchange effected, both of officers and of men. The insecure posi- 
tion in which our prisoners have been confined probably causes this 
desire. They have already been obliged to remove our officers from 
Macon, and (JOG of them have already arrived in Charleston and the 
others are to follow ; this from its being the only secure place aild 
the hope that it may induce to a still further exchange. 

I shall notify Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones that no more exchanges will 
be made through Charleston Harbor, and that if any are authorized 
by the Government they will be made by the Savannah River. The 
effect of this is to induce them to remove our officers from Charles- 
ton to Savannah, so that our fire may be continiied on the city with- 
out the risk of hurting our friends. I have, however, taken pains 
to ascertain wliere our prisoners were confined so as to direct the 
fire to the other parts. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

J. G. FOSTilR, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 4, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, 

Comdg. Dept. S. C, Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C. : 
General : I have received your letter of the 2(1 instant, desiring 
that a permit to pass through our lines be given to Miss Mary A. 
Sparks. As a general rule all persons passing our lines into the 



214 8. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVIl. 

Confederate lines are required to pass with proper permits at Fort 
Monroe, but I will give the permit to Miss Sparks as a matter of 
courtesy to yourself and General Ripley. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

• J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 4, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. L. McLaws, 

Commanding District of Savannah, Ga. : 
General : I have received your letter of the 39th ultimo. The 
transfer of individuals by flag of truce through this department is 
not allowed except in special cases. The special cases include the 
wives of deserters within our lines. All other transfer of individ- 
uals through the lines of the United- States have to be made by the 
way of Fort Monroe after proper permits have been obtained for 
that purpose. No persons upon the list, you inclose to me, except 
the wives of deserters, will be allowed to come through our lines 
here, and these persons even cannot be admitted until we have satis- 
factorily ascertained from our records that they are what they pur- 
port to be. 

An answer upon this point will be made in a few days through 
Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, commanding your department. In future 
I beg that all communications of this kind requiring my action may 
be made by Major-General Jones. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Flag-Steamer Philadelphia, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C, August 4, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Hdqrs. Hilton Head: 
General : Yours of the 1st has been received in relation to a pass 
for leave to certain contrabands. I avoid complications as much as 
possible, and had I been apprised in time, the leave and pass would 
not have been given, though it was nearly certain that 91 very good 
men would h§,ve been lost to the naval depot here. Captain Rey- 
nolds, however, was under the impression that a leave for so limited 
a period would not conflict with the arrangement between us and the 
subsequent orders, and finding he was likely to lose these men un^ 
less he granted their conditions, did so. Under the circumstances, 
it might be well, perhaps, that the leave thus granted should stand, 
and if any of the men fail to return and re-enlist afloat they might 
be conscripted for shore duty. The pass defines the condition very 
clearly.' I will direct Captain Reynolds to adhere in future to our 
agreement. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Bear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Chap. XLVII.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 215 

Headquarters District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, Fla., August 4, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Commanding Department of the South: 

General : I arrived here last night, having changed at the bar 
onto the Mary Benton. The Delaware got aground coming up the 
river. I sent down the Canonicus to ligliten her. She took off the 
troops but could not draw her off. The troops were brought up and 
the boat sent back to take out the cargo. I hope she will get off and 
up here to-night. The Eighth U. S. Colored Troops had been sent 
to Palatka, where they arrived just in time to save a detachment of 
25 cavalry left at that place. They were driven into the intrench- 
ments with a loss of 1 officer and 2 privates prisoners. All are now 
withdrawn. I have sent out to Baldwin the Thirty-fourth and One 
hundred and second U. S. Colored Troops, and ordered in the Seventh 
U. S. Colored Troops. They will be in and embark to-morrow for 
the Head. 

And now about the campaign. General Birney is very sanguine, 
and I do not doubt that had the movement been made in force we 
could have occupied the country to the Suwannee. ' To do it there 
will be required three or four more regiments and another battery. 
I think Birney's plans are good, but a large force will be required. 

I have had to-day a conversation with a Colonel Wilson, a refugee, 
just in from Alachua County. He appears a very strong Union 
man, and has the reputation of having been one throughout the 
war. He is very desirous of having us occupy the country, but says 
do not attempt it with an insufficient force. Seymour's defeat he 
says hurt the cause very much. About 500 Union men, deserters, 
and negroes are in the vicinity of Cedar Keys, and are now raiding 
toward Gainesville. The people confidently expect re-enforcements 
will be sent to Florida. It is thought none have yet arrived. The 
present force is variously estimated at from 1,000 to 2,000 men. The 
infantry are mostly the "new issue." I shall advance the force at 
Baldwin to Barber's and take up the rails of the road from that point 
to Baldwin. If you think I had better try the raid through Alachua 
and Marion I will by that time be re-enforced and will try the thing. 
You will yourself be better able to learn than I can do what chance 
there is of the enemy sending troops here. The locomotive met with 
an accident yesterday ; it was thrown from the track and somewhat 
injured ; how much, I cannot learn, as it has not yet been got on the 
track. The rails had been loosened by the rebels. General Birney 
\^as in the car. No one was injured. 

Can you not persuade somfe of the submarine fellows to come here 
and get the Saint Mary's up ? She is a fine vessel and is not injured. 
The navy will never do it and are not trying. 

I shall immediately occupy Magnolia and build a small work there. 
I will not complete the work at Baldwin, which, by the way, was not 
commenced until General Birney's return from Hilton Head. 

If Sherman has thoroughly beaten Hood it is not probable that 
any troops can be spared by the rebels for Florida. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

^ JNO. P. HATCH, 

Brigadier- Oenerdl. 

One section of artillery additional would be sufficient. 



216 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVII. 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 5, 1864. 

Rear- Admiral John A. Dahlgren, ' 

Comdg. S. Atlantic Block. Squad. , Port Royal Harbor, S. C. : 

Admiral : I have tlie honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
communication of the 4th instant in relation to passes given by Cap- 
tain Reynolds, U. S. Navy, to a number of contrabands to remain 
on shore one week or be subject to the action of the military author- 
ities. In reply I have to state that while I do not object to men from 
the Navy receiving permission to come ashore and remain for a few 
days, while actually in the service, I most certainly do object to men 
i-eceiving such permission after having been virtually discharged 
from the Navy, and their return being optional with the men them- 
selves. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 5, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. A. Schimmelfennig, 

Comdg. Northern District, Department of the South: 

General : Admiral Dahlgren has declared his willingness to lend 
six 11-inch guns, with carriages, implements, and the requisite ofiS- 
cers, crew, and ammunition. The guns are to be landed by the 
navy at Light-House Inlet, and will be transported to their positions 
by the army. It is recommended, however, that at high tide the 
scows used for carrying the shells be run up as high as possible on 
the beach near tlie battery and the shells be thrown overboard, so 
that they can be i:)icked up at low tide by the wagons and taken 
into the battery. Four ]00-pounder Parrott guns will be sent up 
also as soon as transportation can be had. I will borrow from the 
navy some 100 and 300 and 300 pounder ammunition, and send it up 
at the same time, if possible. 

Inclosed you will find a certified coj)y of a letter* just received 
from Colonel Hoyt, Fifty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers, which 
reached these headquarters through one of our released officers. 
You will have a tliorough investigation made, as desired by Colonel 
Hoyt, and ascertain upon whom the i-esponsibility rests. 

I likewise inclose an official coi)y of the oi-dnance reportf from 
your command, with indorsements thereon, and your attention is 
invited to indorsement from Lieut. John R. McGinness, chief of- 
ordiiance, who states that there is a good supply of lacquer on hand,"^ 
and that he even used some himself when up there, instructing the 
men how to lay it on. 

The report of the chief of artillerj'^ for the Northern District states 
that the suggestions of R. P. Parrott have not as yet been put into 
practice. You will cause an investigation to be had in this matter 
at once, and ascertain with whom the fault of this negligence lies, 
and have orders issued immediately to lacquer the shells, as per in- 

»See Part I, p. 86. fSee p. lOoT 



Chap. XLVII.] COERESPONDEKCE, ETC. UNION. 217 

struction given by Lieutenant McGinness, chief of ordnance, Depart- 
ment of the South, when in j'-our district. The officer who is respon- 
sible for this negligence should be punished. 

I wish, in the firing on the city, that the aim be to the right of 
the circular church, and that b, greater range, of 300 to 500 yards, 
be given to the shells. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, Fla., August 5, 18G4. 

Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster : 

General : The Delaware being still aground 1 have not yet sent 
any troops up to the Head. Since writing last night I have had an 
opportunity of conversing with the citizens and feel that if there is 
any authority given you to retain Birney's brigade here it should be 
done. I believe with the assistance of the troops the State- can be 
immediately brought back to the Union. Raids will distress the 
rebels, but Avill not give confidence enough to the people to make 
them rise en masse. I shall immediately occupy Magnolia and 
land the troops from Hilton Head directly at that point. The raid 
tlirougli Marion will be made from there, whilst the force at Bald- 
win will hold in check the troops at the Little Saint Mary's. The 
locomotive is not yet on the track, but it is lioped will be got on 
to-day. We have here no transportation except the railroad. We 
should have a few ambulances, and if three or four of the wagons 
from Beaufort (with teams) could be sent us they would be very 
useful. 

1 hope your orders will allow you to retain Birney's brigade. I 
am told to-day that the force at Cedar Keys mentioned in my other 
letter has some U. S. troops with them and that they are furnished 
with arms and provisions by Woodbury from Key West. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

HilUm Head, S. C, August 6, 18G4. 

Rear-Admiral John A. Dahloren, 

Comdg. S. Atlantic. Block. Sqtiad., Port Royal Harbor S. C. : 

Admiral : From information received this morning from two of 
our officers, escaped prisoners of war, 1 learn that there are about 
sixty more of these officers who have effected their escape, and will 
probably be looking for an opportunity to get into our lines. I would 
respectfully request that you send a boat up Broad River as far as 
possible, to remain there and have a sharp lookout for four or five 
days ; also that boats be sent -to Morgan and Coosaw and Edisto 
Rivers for the same purpose. I have instructed Brigadier-General 
Potter, commanding Hilton Head and Beaufort Districts, to send 



218 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap- XLVn. 

out scouting parties as frequently as possible to assist any of these 
officers they may meet or find any trace of. I would also request 
that some of your boats be ordered for a few days to co-operate with 
our scouting parties in the vicinity of Mucklin's Creek and May 
River. They should be ordered up these creeks and rivers as far as 
possible, as our officers know we are informed of their escape and 
will be expecting some assistance. 

I have the honor to be, admiral, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Flag-Steamer Philadelphia, 
Port Royal Harbor, August 6, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Hdqrs. Hilton Head: 

General : I inclose herewith a report which has just reached me,, 
to the effect that a provost guard yesterday arrested certain laborers 
at Bay Point. These men were in the naval employ and in a purely 
naval jurisdiction. If there were any claims to them or to their 
services it should have been made directly to me, and would have 
received that attention which I yield to all communications from 
your branch of the public service. 

I consider this to be one of the grossest outrages that has come to 
my knowledge, and I have to request that the persons thus removed 
from Bay Point shall be returned to the naval commanding officer 
at that place, and the officer who ordered the guard to be sent to Bay 
Point to seize these persons shall be brought to trial before a court- 
martial. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant. 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. Soidh Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[First indorsement.] 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August G, 1864. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Hall, provost-marshal, will report as soon as 
possible all the facts in this case. 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 

[Second indorsement.] 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Office Provost-Marshal-General, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August G, 1864. 

Respectfully referred to Captain Hennessy, district provost- 
marshal, for report. 

JAMES F. HALL, 
Lieutenant-Colonel and Provost-Marshal-General. 



Chap. XLVH] COKRESPONDENCE, ETC. — tNlON. ^19 

[Third indorsement.! 

Office Provost-Marshal, 
Hilion Head, S. C, August 7, 1864. 
Respectfully rettirned. 

There is no provost guard nor has been at Bay Point by my orders. 
There were some men sent there by Colonel Littlefield, to whom I 
gave papers and instructions to the effect to arrest all men, deserters 
from the Second U. S. Colored Battery or any other deserters, that 
might be found belonging to colored troops. 

JOHN A. HENNESSY, 
Captain, 53d Pennsylvania Volunteers, Provost-Marshal. 

[Fourth indorsement.] 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 7, 1864. 
Respectfully referred to Col. M. S. Littlefield, general superin- 
tendent recruiting service, Department of the South, for investiga- 
tion and report. 

• These papers to be returned with the report called for. 
By command of Mai. Gen. J. G. Foster : 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant-Oeneral. 

[Fifth indorsement.] 

Office Provost-Marshal-Gen., Dept. op the South, 

Hilton Head, 8. C, August 7, 1864. 
Respectfully returned, with indorsement from Captain Hennessy, 
district provost-marshal. 

The guard sent by Colonel Littlefield have either misunderstood 
or exceeded their instructions in exercising an authority Avithin the 
jurisdiction of the naval department. I had no knowledge of this 
party going to Bay Point. I am very certain that no discourtesy 
was intended, and if I had been aware that the party was ordered 
on this duty, I would have given them such instructions as would 
have prevented the cause of the present complaint. 

JAMES F. HALL, 
Lieutenant-Colonel and Provost-Marshal-General. 

[Inclosure.] . 

Bay Point, S. C, August C, 1864. 
Rear- Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron : 
Sir : I have to report that last evening a provost guard from Hil- 
ton Head arrested 19 laborers employed by Mr. Murphy, also 4 men 
employed on the wharf by Acting Master Rhoades, by orders of 
Commander William Reynolds, all of them being contrabands. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. S. GARDNER, 
Acting Master in Charge. 

AH Mr. -Murphy's work in cutting piles, and all his other work, is 
suspended by the arrest of these men. 

WM. REYNOLDS, 
Commander, Commanding Naval Depot. 



220 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVII. 

August 6, 1864. 

Statement of Capt. B. C. G. Reed, Third Ohio Infantry (captured 
3d May, 1863, near Rome, Ga.), and T. B. Stevenson, first lieuten- 
ant. Third Ohio Infantry (captured same place and time) : 

Escaped from Charleston on the way from the cars to the prison. 
Went to negro quarters. Staid in the yard until dark, then made 
ourselves known to the negroes, who hid us away and took us to the 
wharf. We could not get away that night. The negroes then kept 
us Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday, and Monday until Monday 
night, "when we got a boat at Clark's Wharf. The wind was so high 
that we could not make way against it, and at 3 a. m. we were left 
on the flats. We then went back to the tower, and some negro fish- 
ermen kept us till night (Tuesday, 2d). While there two shots from 
Gregg came within 400 yards of us. The negroes took us off at 10 
o'clock, having prepared a boat, and we started for Morris Island. 
Met our picket-boat at 10 o'clock between Gregg and Sumter. 

The negroes gave us good and reliable information. Although 
they are almost starving themselves, yet they would always give us 
enough. An old negro woman got us something to eat. I told hei* 
we had no money. She said, "The Lord God will pay me, massa, if 
you only get through." Those who will depend on the darkies will 
be safe in attempting to escape. Heard that one train of our offi- 
cers (prisoners) was captured by our forces. There had been a cav- 
alry fight ]^ miles from Macon. The roads are cut in every direc- 
tion. The South is now waiting for the election, in hopes of a 
peace candidate being elected. Vallandigham or McClellan they 
wish for, so long as they can defeat Lincoln. 

Hood has a large army, and will do some hard fighting. Their 
army is in good discipline. We found lots of Union men in the 
army, but they are afraid of punishments. We think the crop in 
South Carolina is light, though every acre is planted. They have 
plenty of labor. The railroads are poor, except Macon to Savannah, 
which is good. The rolling-stock is very poor. 

These officers are vouched for by Major Kovacs, Fifty-fourth New 
York Volunteers. A negro man came from Petersburg and says 
that Grant exploded a mine, blowing up the whole city and killing 
75,000 men. Six hundred of our officers are in the jail at Charles- 
ton, directly under the fire from Morris Island. The excitement 
at Charleston on account of the news from Petersburg was intense. 

There was a fight at Atlanta on the 29th. They say that we had 
attacked Cheatham's division and were repulsed. Generals Stewart, 
Dearing, and Wheeler were wounded. A general engagement was 
expected. 

General J. H. Winder has been in command of the prisoners in 
Georgia. He is a regular brute. His treatment of the men is in- 
famous. They are robbed, have no shelter, and die hundreds in a ■ 
day. When told that the Yankee prisoners were dying at Ander- 
sonville 100 a day, he said, "God damn them, let them die. They 
don't die half fast enougli ; that's just what we want." 

Junius Brown and A. D. Richardson are prisoners at Salisbury, 
N. C. Cai)tain Tabb, of General Winder's staff, now a prisonor m 
our lines, captured by General Wilson near Danville, has treated our 
prisoners brutally and infamously. He struck Major Pasco, Six- 
teenth Connecticut Volunteers, over the head because he would not 
get up at night and dig out an old tunnel. 



SAP. XLVn.] C0UEE3P0NDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 321 

[IndorsemeDt.J 

* 

AUGUST 6, 1864. 
Respectfully forwarded to commanding general. 

JAMES F. HALL, 
Lieutenant-Colonel and Provost-Marshal-General. 



Statement of Lieut. P. W. Houlihan, Sixteenth U. S. Infantry; 
Valter Clifford, Sixteenth U. S. Infantry, and James Butler, Sec- 
71(1 U. S. Infantry : 

Escaped from the rebels on the 38th ultimo where the railroad 
rosses the Combahee on the road from Macon. Lieutenant Houli- 
an was captured on J 9th of September, ]8()3, at Chickamauga ; Mr. 
Clifford at same time and place. James Butler captured at Catlett's 
tation, Va., on 11th of April. All were taken to Richmond. Left 
lichmond on 10th of May; taken to Danville. Left Danville on 
4th of May to Macon. Escaped from near Danville and were gone 
ive days and were captured near Madison, Ga., and arrived at 
lacon on 3;*d May. Left Macon on 37th July; 1,680 officers there at 
hat time. We were being removed on account of a reported . raid 
if Stoiiemau, supposed to be at Milledgeville, 30 miles from Macon. 
lix hundred and forty-two were taken on the traiji toward Charles- 
on. When crossing the Combalioe we jumped off the train while 
he guards were aslee]), kept down the river, were lost in a rice 
wamp, got a boat after two days, kej)t down the river at night, 
net pickets 10 miles from mouth of river, passed the obstructions 
in night 31st, arrived at Saint Helena Sound on morning of 1st, 
vewi out to the Ethan Allen, and arrived at this post yesterday 
.. m., 3d instant. 

These officers were recognized by Colonel Slidell, One hundred and 
orty-fourth New York Volunteers. The mass of the i)eople are 
ory dissatisfied so far as we can tell. We were treated badly. No 
ledding, not enough to eat, only 3 quarts corn meal for five days, with 
pounds bacon and ^ pint of sirup, V; pounds salt, and i gill rice, 
,nd same quantity of wormy beans. We built our own sheds from 
umber given to ns. We had to do our policing. We hear from 3 
urgeons, who attended the men at Andersonville, that there are 
iver 37,000 men at Andersonville in an inclosure of twenty-five acres; 
> portion is swamp. That 75 to 100 die per day. Saw 160 taken out 
md buried in one day. They have no shelter of any kind. They 
ake away their blankets, overcoats, &c. One corner of the open 
ield is the hospital with about 600 men in it. At present they have 
10 medical attendance. In exchange they gave us $4.50 for $1 green- 
)acks. This was done officially. The railroad was good. The 
ebel soldiers are disheartened. They evidently have every man 
hey can raise from sixteen to sixty years of age. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 6, 1864. 
3rig. Gen. A. Schimmelfennig, 

Commanding Northern District, Department of the South : 
General. : By direction of the major-general commanding I have 
he honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 
!d instant, inclosing the report of Capt. Richard Allison, One hun- 



222 S. C, FhA., AND ON TKE GA. COAST. ttSAP. XLVII.' 

dred'and twenty-seventh New York Volunteers, the officer in com- 
mand of the boat infantry. The major-general commanding desires 
to express his thanks to the officers and men who made the recon- 
naissance of Fort Sumter on the night of the 2d of August, and is 
much pleased with their energy in the enterprise. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

THOMAS J. ROBINSON, 
First Lieut., U. S. Colored Troojjs, A. A. A. G. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Morris Island, S. C. , August 6, 1864. 

Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Assistant Adjutant- General, Department of the South: 

Sir : I have the honor to report that on the 2d of this month a 
deserter from the enemy came into our lines by way of John's and 
Kiawah Islands. The said deserter was lately conscripted into the 
engineer department, where he has been employed for the last two 
years as a civilian in building bridges and laying platforms. He is 
well informed, and has a general knowledge of the works on James 
Island and in the city. For the last three or four months he was 
engaged on the bridge thrown across the Stono River near Fort 
Pringle. His knowledge with regard to affairs at the North and 
West is unimportant and anticipated by former news. In a few 
words, the principal information gained through him may be 
summed up as follows : 

The bridge across Stono was completed within the last week. The 
enemy is short of laborers. Among the work to be done after the 
recent call for 2,500 negroes who are to be employed on the fortifica- 
tions is filled, a causeway about 700 yards long is to be carried 
across from Pringle bridge, through the marsh, to an inlet or some 
high ground. A battery is to be erected at the same place, and from 
thence a bridge to run in a line directly south across the marsh, and 
over a creek to the mainland on John's Island. 

It has long been my opinion, and it is corroborated by the statements 
of this deserter, that the enemy intends to extend his lines on John's 
Island, protecting himself as he advances by new works which he 
throws up in his rear. Elliott's Cut, which is laid down on the 
Coast Survey charts of 1825, but which does not appear except as a 
creek on the sketches of late years, the entrance to Stono River hav- 
ing been closed by a sand bank, has been re-opened, a mud machine 
having worked on it for nine months. The bridge that lay across 
this cut has also been taken apart, and it is now passable by vessels..! 
40 feet broad and of 7 feet draught. Wappoo Cut has been obstructed 
near Stono River by the sinking of a schooner and driving in of 
spiles on each side of it, and by a bridge thrown across just above 
the schooner, and where the ferry used to be. 

Since the recent attack on the 2d of July the enemy has closed 
Fort Pringle in the rear by a breast- work six feet high. He has also 
erected a new battery a few hundred yards to the east of Pringle, 
which mounts two mortars and two guns. 

I shall retain this deserter for the purpose of obtaining such 
information from him as I may require from time to time, hig 



Chav. XLVn.l CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 223- 

information being valuable on account of the sjjecific knowledge 
which he possesses with regard to the works on James Island and in 
the city. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding District. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 6, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. E. E. Potter, 

Comdg. Dist. of Beaufort, Hilton Head, &c. , Beaufort, S. C. : 
General : By direction of the major-general commanding, I have 
tlie honor to forward herewith extracts from a letter from Brigadier- 
General Schimmelfennig, commanding Northern District, Depart- 
ment of the South, dated headquarters Northern District, Depart- 
ment of the South, Morris Island, S. C, August 3, 1864 ; 

Last night two persons in a boat coming out from Charleston were picked up 
by our picket-boats. They represented themselves as officers of the Third Ohio 
Volunteers, lately brought to Cfcarleston and now escaped. They give thfeir names 
as B. C. G. Reed, captain. Third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and T. B. Stevenson, 
first lieutenant, Third Ohio Volunteer Infantry. They relate that there are 650 
U. S. officers now confined in the jail at Charleston, lately brought there from 
Macon, Ga. Two other parties of prisoners of about 1,000 were started for Charles- 
ton, but v^^ere, for some reasons, not sent through. The officers report that com- 
munication between Charleston and Atlanta has been interrupted since the 39th 
ultimo. They also state that a party of 60 U. S. officers effected their escape some- 
where near Charleston, and will try to get through our lines. I shall do everything 
possible on my front to meet and assist them, sending out parties on Kiawah, Sea- 
brook, and John's Islands. 

The major-general commanding directs that parties be sent out 
immediately to their assistance, if possible, on a reconnaissance for 
that purpose. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

THOMAS J. ROBINSON, 
First Lieut., Tiventy-first U. S. Colored Troops, A. A. A. G. 



Headquarters District of West Florida, 

Barrancas, August 6, 1864. 
Maj. George B. Drake, 

Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Gulf: 

Major : I have the honor to report that Captain Jouett, U. S. 
Navy, commanding gun-boat Metacomet, arrived at the Pensacola 
navy-yard this noon. He left Mobile Bay under flag of truce, with 
the wounded of both sides on board of his vessel, and gives verbally 
the following glorious news : 

Admiral Farragut passed the bar y;esterday, the 5th instant, at 8 
a. m. , with his gigantic fleet, comprising four monitors and fourteen 
additional armed vessels. The admiral directed the movements of 
his numerous vessels from the maintop of his flag-ship Hartford. 
When abreast of Fort Morgan, the monitor Tecumseh, Captain 
Craven, commanding, was blown up with a torpedo and sunk within 
a minute. The rest of the fleet passed the fort about 9 o'clock, well 
cut up, and captured, after a most sanguinary fight, the rebel ram 
Tennessee, with Admiral Buchanan and all the officers and crew. 



224 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVII. 

The gun-boat Selma was cliased up the bay 4 miles by the Meta- 
comet and captu^d, the gun-boat Gaines disabled and run ashore 
at Fort Morgan. The Phillipp, a small dispatch steamer of ours, 
attempting to follow the fleet, was burned by the enemy's shells. 

From the monitor Tecumseh only 2 officers and 13 men were saved; 
the gallant Captain Craven lost with all the rest. In addition to 
this loss, the casualties in our fleet were about GO killed and wounded. 
Admiral Buchanan, with his right leg badly shattered at the knee, 
was brought in, with 55 other wounded from botli sides, to the 
navy-yard hospital ; tlie brave Captain Mullany, commanding the 
Oneida, among them, with his right arm shot off. The rebel gun- 
boat Morgan escaped and put to sea. 

Captain Jouett delivered to the commander of Fort Morgan this 
morning the written demand of Admiral Farragut to surrender the 
fort, and will call for the answer to-morrow morning. 

By this brilliant victory our gallant navy have obtained great ad- 
vantages, and, separating Forts Morgan, Gaines, and Powell, secured 
for themselves a safe anchorage, with full control of the forts and 
bay up to the city. The chartered steam transport Merrimac, Capt. 
Frederick A. Sampson commanding, arrived this morning with one 
battalion of the Second Maine Cavalry, Colonel Woodman com- 
manding, and is disembarking at the navy-yard. The steam trans- 
port Mississippi, with the Second Battalion on board, was left behind 
yesterday evening, aground at the Southwest Pass of the Mississippi 
B,iver. I exiiect her in to-night, and as soon as the Second Battalion 
is disembarked will start to cross the Perdido and control the east 
shore of Mobile Bay. The horses of the Second Maine Cavalry are 
in poor condition and the men very sickly, but there is no time at 
I^resent for recuperation ; they will have to move at once. 

I am, major, very resijectfuUy, your obedient servant, 

ASBOTH, 
Brigadier- General. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hiltoii Head, S. C, August 8, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Hai.leck, 

Chief of Staff of Armies of United States, Washington, D. C. : 
General : The balance of Brig. Gen. William Birney's brigade 
leaves here to-night and to-morrow morning, having just arrived 
from Florida. It is stronger than I thought, looking at the returns, 
for now that the extra-duty men are in it numbers 3,000 effectives. 
It is a good brigade. I shall do whatever can be done in the way of 
small raids with the troops that remain. The enemy is strengthened 
by the arrival of the battalions of militia which have been called out 
in South Carolina by General Samuel Jones and in Georgia by Gov- • 
ernor Brown. This body of militia, or at least that portion of it 
that is now daily reporting at Savannah and Charleston, is reported 
by deserters as being considerable in point of numbers, 500 arriving 
daily, but very inferior in all that goes to make good soldiers. I 
have no fears of anything they can do against us. They are fearing 
an attack from us. The health of the <lepartment continues good. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding, 



Chap. XLVU.] CORBESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 225 

Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, A C, August 8, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. M. C. Meigs, 

Qiuirtermaster-General, U. S. Army : 

General : I have received your letter of the 28th ultimo. The 
Delaware has arrived. The Rescue, Island City, and Planter have 
not arrived yet. The Philadelphia is thought to he a mistake, as 
the only boat of that name belonging to this department is nowhere 
iindergoing repairs. 

With respect to the Ben De Ford, I can only say that we want such 
a vessel, as she would be the only really seaworthy vessel in rough 
weather suitable to carry freight to Morris and Folly Islands or to 
Florida, or to carry troops or dispatches to the North. As to what 
you say of her cost as a yacht for the commanding general, I beg 
leave to enter my protest in all respects as referring to me. I do 
not Want, neither do I use, nor have I used, any vessel for my ex- 
clusive use. When I go to any place I take the first vessel that is 
ready. If she is without freight, I have all that is to go to the 
place put on board. 

On my last trip to Morris Island I had 500 barrels of powder piled 
against my stateroom. I have, of course, no choice in the matter 
of vessels, and am only glad to get anything that will serve us. 
I am satisfied as long as the vessels perform their work and do 
not suffer shipwreck with a load of troops on board. I cannot, 
however, suffer it to be understood that I desire any vessel for my 
own use. 

Five propellers, the Verona, Beaufort, Collins, James Green, and 
Trade Wind, leave here to-night and to-morrow, with Brigadier- 
General Birney's brigade, for Fort Monroe. The Collins and James 
Green are then to proceed to New York for repairs. The Verona 
goes there on her regular trip from here. The Beaufort and Trade 
Wind are ordered back here. Two broken-down steamers, the 
Nantasket and Peconic, will be sent North for repairs as soon as fair 
weather sets in. The Alice Price is a wreck in the Saint John's 
River. 

I am now commencing the building of two "assaulting arks" at the 
yard here. These are to carry 1,000 men each, and are to be pro- 
pelled by oars. 

Requisitions for f-inch iron as musket-proof protection for the 
sides will be sent on, together with plans, as soon as they can be 
copied. I also propose to build a light-draught iron-clad, and 
plans are now preparing. This is absolutely required for a partic- 
ular service where the navy iron-clads cannot go, even if they 
were willing, on account of their draught of water. I shall ob- 
tain the iron from the Lake City railroad, in Florida. I wish to , 
know if you cannot have these rolled out into 2-inch plates for me, 
or exchange them for either 2 or 4 inch plates. Time is a considera- 
tion, and unless the exchange or the rolling out can be done without 
delay I will use the rails as they are. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
- Major-General, Comvi.xnding. 

15 R R— VOL XXXV, PT II 



226 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. IChap. XLVn. 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 8, 1864. 
Rear- Admiral J. A. Dahlgken, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron : 
Admiral: Ui)on the receipt of your letter of the 6th instant I 
caused a strict inquiry to be made into all the circumstances of 
arrest of the working party at Bay Point. The following is the re- 
sult, viz : 

First. Colonel Littlefield, superintendent of recruiting, ordered 
a party of men from the colored battery at this place to search for 
deserters, of which there are known to be several hundred on 
Saint Helena and Ladies Islands, and Captain Hennessy, provost- 
marshal, gave the requisite pass to Bay Point for this party under 
Sergeant Mitchell, who tried, but failed, to arrest 3 men whom they 
recognized as deserters from their own company. 

Second. After dark 13 men came ashore who, they were told, were 
deserters, and whom they arrested as such. The sergeant searched 
for an officer but could find none until the next morning, at which 
time he reported to him, when, finding the men to be claimed as in 
his service, the sergeant gave them up. I inclose a copy of the 
statements of Colonel Littlefield, Lieutenant-Colonel Hall, provost- 
marshal-general, and Captain Hennessy, also of the sergeant, and 
if this be not satisfactory to you, I respectfully request that you will 
forward to me the charges you have to make against any of the par- 
ties concerned, and I will order their trial immediately. 

Very respectfully and truly, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 8, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, 

Commanding Confederate Forces in 

Soidh Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, Charleston, S. C. : 
General : In reply to a communication from Maj. Gen. L. Mc- 
Laws, commanding at Savannah, dated July 29, inclosing list of 
names of females who desire to enter our lines, I have to state that 
I cannot permit any but the wives of deserters or refugees to come 
within our lines at this point. All the others will have to cross at 
Fort Monroe, after receiving the permit to do so. 

Inclosed you will find a list* of those whom I will allow to cross 
at Port Royal Ferry when convenient to yourself and I receive 
timely notice of the same. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Office of Chief of Arty. , Dept. of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 8, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Commaading Department of the South: 
General : I have the honor to inform you that I have so far com- 
plied with your letter of June 11 as relates to the Districts of Beau- 

* Omitted ' ' 



Chap. XI.vn.l CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 227 

fort and Hilton Head. I found the heavy artillerists at Beaufort 
well drilled in the manual of the piece, but ignorant of magazine 
duties, to the important points in which I called the attention of 
the battery commanders, and directed that immediate attention be 
given to this most important part of the drill. I found tliese garri- 
sons entirely unacquainted with the nomenclature of the piece, and 
devoted some time to instructing the men as to the names of the dif- 
ferent parts of the gun, carriage, and chassis. 

Company D, Twenty-sixth U. S. Colored Troops, garrisoning 
Battery Burnside, on the second line of intrenchments, was particu- 
larly well drilled in the manual of the piece. 

Fort Duane I found garrisoned by different detachments from dif- 
ferent companies, which from necessity made poor artillerists of all. 
I suggested to the district commander that one company be detailed 
for that special j)urpose. Targets were being erected for practice, 
tlie same having been authorized by the district commander. I am 
of opinion that the artillerists in this district are able to serve their 
guns with effect in case of an attack. 

The artillerists in the Hilton Head District, those who had drilled 
at all, were in fair drill. There had been no artillery drills at Bay 
Point, it being garrisoned by invalids of the second class, who are 
fit only for guard duty. General Potter sends an infantry company 
there to-day and drill will be commenced immediately under a com- 
petent instructor. 

The garrison of Fort Welles is well instructed in all the details of 
their duties. 

The garrisons at the intrenchments. One hundred and forty -fourth 
New York, have not drilled at all, as artillery fatigue work and 
guard duty consume their whole time, as I am toui by General 
Hatch. 

The garrison at Fort Pulaski is well instructed in the details of 
their duties. 

It is my opinion that neither the fort at Bay Point or the intrench- 
ments could be efficiently served. in case of an attack. I have fur- 
nished battery commanders with the necessary books for instruction 
and copies of General Orders, No. 43, from War Department, which 
prescribes the care of field-works and their armaments. I shall go 
to the Northern District by next boat on a tour of instruction. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

C. R. BRAYTON, 
Col. 3d E. I. AHy., Chief of Arty., Dept. of the South. 



Hdqks. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Morris Island, S. C, August 8, 1864. 
Col. William Gurney, Commanding, Morris Island: 

Colonel : The brigadier-general commanding directs that you 
cause the boat infantry to place buoys in the channels between Forts 
Strong, Putnam, Sumter, Johnson, Simkins' Point, and Paine's 
Dock, so that boats may be able to navigate those waters with con- 
fidence on a dark night, starting from Fort Strong or Putnam, 
Paine's Dock, or Light-House Creek. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. W. SCHAUFFLER, 
Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp. 



228 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 8, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. E. E. Potter, 

Beaufort, S. C. : 
Major-General Foster wislies the Twenty-ninth Connecticut Col- 
ored Volunteers to embark in time to reach Hilton Head at daylight 
to-morrow morning. 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Headquarters District op West Florida, 

Barrancas, August 8, 1864. 
Maj. George B. Drake, 

Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Department of the Gulf: 
Major : I have the honor to report that the Second Battalion of 
the Second Maine Cavalry has arrived on the steam army transport 
Mississippi, and the disembarkment has just been completed at the 
navy-yard. I will endeavor to cross the Perdido to-morrow with a 
combined force not over 1,000 strong, to control, as far as possible, 
the east shore of Mobile Bay, and deprive Fort Morgan also of its 
land communications. The steam transport Hudson is under orders 
to take the Seventh Vermont Regiment north, and will leave to- 
morrow. And the quartermaster steamer Lizzie Davis is declared 
by its captain and engineer entirely unsafe (please see Captain Hau- 
na's inclosed report). Thus I am left at the present critical moment 
entirely without steamers ; yet I made arrangements to cross the 
Perdido near its mouth on a variety of boats, scows, and other small 
vessels. 

I would here respectfully request that two small steamers be or- 
dered here as soon as possible to transport the troops more promptly 
across and up the Perdido, and to supply them, as no wagon train 
can follow them. 

Very respectfully, maior, your obedient servant, 

ASBOTH, 
Brigadier- General. 



Hdqrs. Dept. of S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 

Charleston, S. C, August 9, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Commanding U. S. Forces, Hilton Head : 
General : I have the honor to communicate to you that Maj. J. 
F. Lay, assistant adjutant-general of my staff, will meet any officer 
of your staff whom you may designate, at Port Royal Ferry, on 
Tuesday morning next (16th instant), at 8 a. m. Major Lay will 
deliver to him the equivalent of 26 privates, reported bj'^ him as due 
to your Government upon the recent exchange, and will also take 
down a number of privates in exchange for those now held by you 
a willingness to exchange whom was expressed by Major Anderson, 
of your staff. There has been an unavoidable delay in bringing, to 
this place the officers desired for exchange. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

SAM. JONES, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Cbap. XLVn.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 229 

Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. op the South, 

Morris Island, S. C, August 9, 1864. 
Col. William Gurney, Commanding, Morris Island: 

Colonel -. The general commanding directs that in employing the 
fatigue details from Folly Island they be allowed to do any work 
there is at the dock or elsewhere at the rear and not be invariably 
sent to the extreme front. The regiments that give these details 
have had tlie opportunity lately to get their fair proportion of 
killed and wounded, such as has not been had by the One hundred 
and twenty-seventh New York Volunteers, Fifty-second Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteers, and Thirty-second U. S. Colored Troops, on this 
island, the former of which has not had a man killed during its two 
years of service. These regiments should as far as practicable do 
the work at the front. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ED. W. SCHAUFFLER, 
Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. op the South, 

Morris Island, S. C. , August 9, '1864. 
Col. William Gurney, Commanding, Morris Island: 

Colonel : The brigadier-general commanding directs that you 
send a reliable and intelligent man during this night onto the isl- 
and between Light-House Creek and Simkins. This man will re- 
main there during the day to-morrow and closely observe Fort 
Sumter and its \^arf. He should have a small boat hidden in 
Light-House Creek and should take some brush along with him to 
make a shade. There must be a guard kept at Light-House Creek 
while he is out. 

I have the honor to be, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ED. W. SCHAUFFLER,' 
Lieut-enant and Aide-de-Camp. 



Headquarters District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, Fla., August 9, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Commanding Department of the South : 

General : I have visited Baldwin, where there are now three 
regiments of infantry, a battery, and the Seventy-fifth Ohio. Scouts 
are made from there daily, and the thorough destruction of the rail- 
road toward Lake City is being completed. We find the job of de- 
stroying a railroad a much more difficult one than the accounts of 
the raids in Virginia would lead one to suppose. We will be thorough 
with this one. 

I yesterday reoccupied Magnolia, intending it as a point from 
which to start raids ; also as a point for refugees and negroes to 
reach the river. As soon as the troops arrive I shall commence the 
movement. With the force at Baldwin I will threaten Lake City 
to cover the raid, which will sweep through Alachua and Marion 
and come out at Palatka. I will occu^iy that point temporarily, 
after the movement commences. The force that threatens Lake 
City will fall back to Magnolia, when no longer needed to cover the 
movement south, and will occupy a line near the river to prevent 



230 S. C, PLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. ICbap. XLVII, 

torpedoes being laid down and to assist refugees. The troops 
guarding the railroad to Baldwin will fall hack to Camp Finegan 
when the movement has fairly commenced. I shall not injure the 
road this side of Baldwin, but will cut that to Cedar Keys in a few 
places. 

A great many refugees are coming in or crossing the river above 
here. To this time over 700 men have taken the oath at this place. 

I do not despair of raising a regiment of cavalry if I can get the 
horses to mount them. So far only 15 men are actually enlisted, but 
if any of the State agents will come here with the bounty money I 
will have four companies immediately. The men need the money 
for their families, who come in perfectly destitute. General Birney 
made a requisition for Spencer carbines to arm them. I hope that 
description of arm will be furnished, as it is found well adapted to 
this damp climate. 

If you can, please spare me for temporary service the remainder 
of the Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry. We must depend very much 
on our cavalry here. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 

The weather here is horrible ; rain half the time, and the sun in- 
tensely hot in the interval. If the thing had not gone so far I would 
not recommend attempting it for a month or more. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Morris Island, S. C, August 10, 1864. 
Col. William Gurney, 

Commanding, Morris Island: 

Colonel : The general commanding directs that you cause all the 
row-boats in your command requiring repairs to be put in good 
order and serviceable condition as soon as possible, and that you re- 
port within what time that can be done. I am instructed to inform 
you that, Captain Edwards having reported tlie Swamp Angel Bat- 
tery ready. Captain Grace has received orders to mount a 30-pounder 
Parrott gun there to-night. 

The general desires that you will, personally and through your 
staff, (Jb everything in your power to facilitate and expedite the 
transportation of ammunitif)n to the front, making sure that all the 
teams are engaged in it and kept to their work. The general expects 
to be able to furnish you with more teams soon. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ED. W. SCHAUFFLER, 
Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp. .v 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 10, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. John P. Hatch, 

Comdg. District of Florida, Jacksonville, Fla. : 
General : I am instructed by the -major-general commanding to 
acknowledge the receipt of your communications of the 4th and 5th 
instant, and state that your plan of operating from Magnolia as a 



Chap. XlVII] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 231 

base seems to him not to be quite so desirable as to strike out from 
Baldwin, and then push down the country, as he thinks the latter plan 
would not require as many ti'oops as the one you propose ; still, he 
defers the matter to your judgment, as being upon the ground and 
therefore possessed of full information, and expects you to act ac- 
cordingly. 

The major-general commanding directs* me to inform you that you 
must not expect any furtJier re-enforcements at present, but on the 
contrary to state that you have one regiment, the One hundred and 
second U. S. Colored Troops, that is only temporarily assigned to 
you for your present expedition. This regiment belongs in Beau- 
fort, and will have to be sent back as soon as practicable, as the gar- 
rison of that place has lately been reduced two regiments, and the 
force there at present is entirely inadequate for a proper defense of 
that point. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Captain and Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Hdqrs. Military Division of West Mississippi, 

New Orleans, La., August 10, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. A. Asboth, 

Comdg. District of West Florida, Barrancas, Ma.: 
Sir : The operations in the vicinity of Mobile may determine the 
rebels to make some demonstrations against Pensacola, and the 
commanding general desires that you be on your guard against any 
enterprise of this kind. Keep your troops so well in hand that your 
position will be entirely secure. At the same time he wishes such 
demonstrations made with your cavalry force as will deter the- en- 
emy from any attempt to re-enforce Foit Morgan from' the eastward 
of the Mobile Bay. He desires also that you keep General Granger 
advised of any movement of the enemy that you may be able to dis- 
cover. 

I am sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

C. T. CHRISTENSEN, 
Major and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Washington, August 11, 1864. 
Major-General Foster, 

Commanding Department of the South : 
General : Lieutenant-General Grant directs that you will send 
to Washington all the troops you can possibly spare, remaining 
yourself purely on the defensive. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. W. HALLECK, 
Major-General, Chief of Staff. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 11, 1864. 
Brigadier-General Hatch, C&mdg. District of Florida: 

General : I have just received your letter of the 9th. I have 
already written to you in regard to the movement, which I hope 



232 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVH. 

will prove a success. I intend to make a movement up Broad River, 
landmg at Hog's Neck or Boyd's Neck, to keep the enemy on the 
qui vive while you are engaged in your operation. I shall require 
for this all the cavalry now here, which is only 100 in number. 
There is one thing that I wish done particularly. It is to secure 
enough railroad iron at Jacksonville or Fernandina to cover an iron- 
clad that I am about building here. Get all the iron that you can 
from the Lake City road beyond Baldwin. Do not, however, let 
this interfere with your raid. If you think the season to be un- 
favorable for the raid, you can wait until a favorable time occurs. 
I am not particular that it should be done now ; I only want the 
best occasion to be seized for that purpose. 

General Birney and his brigade left yesterday. He is to have a 
division in the Tenth Corps. He regretted the change, however, as 
he preferred to command in Florida. The brigade was 3,500 strong 
and mostly effectives. It went off in good style and fine spirits. 
Yours, truly, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, August 12, 1864. 
Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Assistant Adjutant- General, Hilton Head, &c.: 
Captain : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
letter of the 10th instant, in which you inform me that no more 
troops can be sent here. I had supposed that it was the intention of 
the major-general commanding that I should carry out the plans 
submitted to him by General Birney. To do this a larger force than 
I have here will be necessary. I cannot say, however, that I approve 
the plan of fhe campaign laid down by him, and am not sure that I 
am forced to abandon it. The same thing attempted six weeks later 
would be much more complete. 

I go to-day to Baldwin to make arrangements to commence an 
extensive raid on Monday next ; it will occupy five days, and I con- 
fidently hope that it will bring into our lines a large number of con- 
trabands and considerable means of transportation. The loj'al 
citizens are apparently very zealous, and will be of considerable use 
during the expedition. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH. 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 

The One hundred and second will be returned to Hilton Head 
immediately on the return of the expedition. 



Headquarters District op West Florida, 

Barrancas, August 12, 1864. 
Maj. C. T. Christensen, 

Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Div. of West Mississippi: 
Major : I have the honor.to report that, having no Government 
steamer able to enter the Perdido, I engaged on the 9th instant Mr. 
Clapp's tug to take scows and other small vessels in tow for crossing 



Chap. XLVn.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — ITNION. 233 

the Perdido, with the promise that it would be ready to start the 
next day. I made all arrangements accordingly, but the tug is not 
yet at the Barrancas wharf on account of repairs required. The in- 
closed note just received gives me once more the assurance that the 
small steamer will be reported to-morrow morning ; if so, I will 
cross the Perdido at its mouth in the evening with 1,000 men, com- 
prising infantry, cavalry, and two pieces of artillery, and move along 
the beach toward Bonsecours Bay the following day. 

It is now. more than five months that I have been constantly ap- 
plying for two small steamers of 4 to 5 feet draught, so urgently 
required for entering the Perdido and all the tributaries of the 
Pensacola Bay, the Escambia, Blackwater, Yellow Water, and Choc- 
tawhatchee Rivers. At last one was sent, the Lizzie Davis, entirely 
unseaworthy and unserviceable, as the inclosed report of Captain 
Hanna, district quartermaster, shows. I would therefore most re- 
spectfully request the commanding general's orders for the exchange 
of the Lizzie Davis for another small steamer answering the require- 
ments above alluded to. 

Very respectfully, major, your obedient servant, 

ASBOTH, 
Brigadier- General. 



Flag-Steamer Philadelphia, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C, August 13, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Hdqrs. Hilton Head . 

General : Yours of the 8th instant, with its inclosures, was 
received here yesterday morning, immediately on my arrival from 
the south. After the occurrence complained of at Bay Point, I 
caused Acting Master Gardner to be arrested as a preliminary to a 
trial for neglect of duty, if upon examination such should appear 
necessary. Since that Acting Master Gardner has addressed me a 
further explanation of the whole matter. 

With such consideration as the pressure of business permits my 
giving to the papers, which you were so good as to send me, it ap- 
pears to me that no order was given, or intention existed, to violate 
the naval jurisdiction at Bay Point, either by the provost-marshal- 
general or the provost-marshal at this place, nor by Colonel Littlefield. 
Still, it is a fact that the guard from Hilton Head did arrest a number 
of men at Bay Point within the naval jurisdiction ; that these men were 
in naval employ, and had just returned from their work when they 
were arrested, and that they were not deserters from the army, as the 
sergeant of the guard was himself satisfied of before giving them up. 
Under these circumstances I think you will concur with me that it 
is eminently proper to prevent the recurrence of such proceedings, 
because they are prejudical to good order, to the interests of the 
public service, and are likely to lead to collision, and even to blood- 
shed, between the subordinate officers and men of the two services. 
I would therefore request that you would, by general order, make 
known that the arrests made at Bay Point, within the naval juris- 
diction, were unauthorized and were unintentional ; secondly, that 
no officer under your command shall attempt to exercise airy author- 
ity within the naval jurisdiction, or shall send parties of men within 
said jurisdiction to make any arrests whatever, but that of deserters 



234 S. C., PLA.. AND ON THE GA. COAST. (Chap. XLVII. 



from the army or persons not in naval employ who have violated a 
military law, and shall be within the naval jurisdiction. Applica- 
tion shall be made to the senior naval officer i)resent, afloat, and lie 
will be instructed by me to use every means in his power for the 
apprehension and delivery of said person. My belief is that such 
an order will remove all misapprehension of the arrests made at 
Bay Point having been sanctioned by yourself, or by those in au- 
thority under you, and will prevent the possibility of a repetition. 

The naval jurisdiction now includes the following localities : 
Beginning at Land's End, all south of aiine marked "C D" on the 
survey of the Fox commissioners, and defining the soiithern limit 
of the military reservation. Secondly, all that part of Phillip's 
Island known as Bay Point, with the exception of the ground defined 
by the site of the fort, and confined strictly to that line, which I 
would request may particularly be made known to the commanding- 
officer of the fort, inasmuch as Acting Master Gardner reports tome 
that the commanding officer at the fort told him that he had no in- 
structions as to any naval jurisdiction at Bay Point, and that he was 
the commander of Bay Point, Thirdly, all the firm groimd and 
marsh between Land's End and Bay Point, together with the inter- 
secting creeks, are occupied for naval purposes, and are within the 
naval jurisdiction. 

I think you will admit that this is an extremely moderate extent 
occupied for naval purposes, when it is considei'ed that the whole 
of this harbor with the adjoining territory, Beaufort included, 
was fir.st occupied and held by the navy, and that at no time during 
the last twelve months have I been able to obtain a house for the 
accommodation of the sick of the squadron in the whole town of 
Beaufort, but have been compelled to rely entirely oh the courtesy 
of the army medical authorities for the accommodation of 4 or 5 
officers, the nature of whose sickness made it desirable that they 
should reside ashore until cured. I trust, therefore, that you will 
use this opportunity to make known to your command that they 
must not trespass upon the limits of the naval jurisdiction, as they 
are only occupied for the most necessary purpose of keeping the 
numerous vessels of this command in a condition to meet the exigen- 
cies of the public service in this squadron. 

I am much obliged to you, general, for the pains you have taken 
to have this matter properly examined into, and am, with miich 
respect, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Headquakters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 15, 18C4. 

Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff, Washington, D. C. : 
General : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
telegram of the 11th, conveying the order of Lieutenant-General 
Grant, directing me to send to Washington all the troops that I 
could possibly spare. I had already sent Brigadier-General Birney's 
brigade, which I thought was all that I could safely spare, but being 
desirous to carry out my orders to the very letter, and to meet the 



Cbap XtVll] CORnESfONBKNCE, HTC. — tJNiON. 235 

wishes of the commanding, general, I liave so arranged, since the re- 
ceipt of your telegram, as to send three or four white regiments in 
addition. Although this will leave me too weak in some points, 
especially as I have to provide for the security of the prisoners of 
war that are to be sent here, yet I believe I can so arrange, by the 
rapid transfer of troops from one point to another in case of 
attack, as to meet any emergency that is likely to occur. I trust it 
will not be longer than the return of cold weather before a sufficient 
force can be given me to enable me to operate successfully against 
the enemy in this department. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, . 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Flag-Steamer Philadelphia, 
Port Royal Harbor, August 15, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Headquarters Hilton Head: 
General : I have received your note inclosing extracts from the 
Hew York Herald, purporting to be from a naval correspondent. I 
know of no regular correspondent on board of any of the vessels of 
this squadron. 1 should regret very much that any person under 
my command should so far forget what was due to the public inter- 
est as to write for publication any disparaging remarks on the army 
or its operations. I will endeavor to prevent anything of the kind 
being done, so far as lies in ray power; at the same time it is a matter 
of notoriety that during the ojjerations against Morris Island, and 
for some months afterward, the most outrageous lies were penned 
respecting myself by persons residing within a military jurisdic- 
tion, and I am not aware that any effort was ever made to suppress 
them or punish the perpetrators by any of the army authorities. I 
shall be happy now to extend that measure of justice and courtesy 
which has been denied to myself. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 15, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, 

Comdg. Conf. Forces in S. C, Go., and Fla., Charleston, S. C: 
General : I have the honor to inform you that I have received 
information from the headquarters U. S. Army that 600 Confederate 
officers, prisoners of war, are to be sent Jiere to be placed under the 
fire of your guns, the same as those of our officers now in the city of 
Charleston. I respectfully request to be informed as to the number 
of U. S. officers now confined in the city of Charleston, S. C. 
Very respectfully, your o"bedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



236 S. C, PLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. 3a.vn. 

Office of Chief Engineer, Dept. of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 15, 1864. 
[General J. G. Foster ;] 

General : In compliance with your instructions I have the honor 
to submit the following extract from a report which I made to Gen- 
eral Gillmore last fall relative to placing a battery on Paine's Wharf. 
The report was made after a careful inspection of the locality : 

I found it (Paine's Wharf) to consist essentially of a floor of heavy planking rest- 
ing on some foundation of which I could not ascertain the nature, and inclosed by 
a crib- work of heavy square timbers about 4 feet high, except on the side toward 
Moultrie and Gregg, where it has been burned away down to the flooring. About 
13 feet inside the crib-work is another inclosed space about 1^ feet high, also com- 
posed of square timbers. Its sides are' parallel to those of the exterior crib-work. 
This inclosed space is filled up flush with oyster shells. 

In shape it (the wharf) is a hexagon equilateral, but not equiangular. The sides 
are about 70 feet long ; those of the interior polygon about 54 feet long. It lies on 
the left side of the mouth of the creek and detached about 30 feet from shore, ^i, 
high tide the water overflows the flooring in those places where the parapet was 
burned. Spring tides probably overflow the greater part of the area flUed with 
shells. 

In conclusion, I beg leave to state that in my opinion the results 
to be attained by placing a battery in this location are entirely in- 
commensurate with the time and labor required for its construction. 
Besides, when completed, it will be often open to a surprise party, 
as it cannot be supported. 

In addition I will state that the distance to Sumter from Paine's 
Wharf is If miles ; from the Marsh Battery to Sumter 2J miles. 
The line of fire from the Marsh Batters'^ is nearly perpendicular to 
the gorge wall of Sumter. 

Paine's Wharf lies considerably to the right of this line of fire. 
The line of communication to Paine's Wharf is about one-third 
longer than to the Marsh Battery, and being by water is often 
impassable at low tide. 

The space available on this wharf would be mostly occupied by 
the battery, as will be seen by the accompanying sketch. The 
direction indicated for the battery is necessary, otherwise the work 
would be seen in reverse from James Island. There will be little 
or no room for building bomb-proof shelters for the supports, hence 
the diificulty of holding the work. 

The shore of the harbor to the left of this point is good and firm, 
so that a surprise party might easily creep along there and surprise 
the work. 

Finally, I am afraid the foundation would not be reliable for 
firing heavy guns. It would probably settle unequally and necessi- 
tate continual alterations. I think the Marsh Battery decidedly the 
best location. A 100-pounder woiild compensate sufificiently the 
increased range (two-thirds of a mile). 

The battery may be increased in area by pulling Paine's Dock to 
pieces and towing the timbers to the Marsh Battery ; also by using 
marsh mud in making parapets. I think a magazine and bomb- 
proof could be constructed there. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

CHAS. R. SUTER, 
Chief Engineer, Department of the South. 



Chap. XL^^I.] 



COnUESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 



237 




238 



S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVII. 




Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 15, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. A. Schimmelfennig, 

Northern Dist., Dept. of the South, Morris Island, S. C. : 
General : I am instructed by the major-general commanding to 
direct that you send to this post the Thirty-second U. S. Colored 
Troops, with all their camp and garrison equipage, as soon as pos- 
sible. 

The major-general commanding further directs that you send here 
one white regiment from your command, to be selected by yourself, 
with all camp and garrison equipage. They are to go north. All 
details of officers and men from the above regiments will be imme- 
diately called in. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, August 15, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Commanding Department of the South: 
General : Your letters of the 11th and 12th came to hand last 
evening. All arrangements are completed, and this morning two 
parties start on a raid. Colonel Noble, with three small regiments 



Chap, xlvu.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 239 

of infantry, three pieces of artillery, and 30 cavalry, threatens 
the enemy at the Little Saint Mary's. The Seventy-fifth Ohio burns 
the bridges over New River, and then marches south. The Fourth 
Massachusetts Cavalry, moving from Magnolia, make a junction 
with the Seventy-fifth at Starke to-night. When Colonel Noble has 
completed his part of the operations h5 will retire upon Magnolia. 
The cavalry will sweep the country as far as that lying immediately 
south of Orange Lake, and will come in to Palatka. I expect both 
commands to be in at the river on Friday. I will send a force to 
Palatka, covered by a gun-boat, the day before the troops are ex- 
pected there. Baldwin I do not think it is best to attempt to hold. 
If the enemy occupy it we can turn them from Magnolia. It is a 
very unhealthy position, and as the road from there to the Little 
Saint Mary's is thoroughly destroyed, I see no importance in it as a 
military position. 

We were very unfortunate here with our locomotives. The old 
one ran off the track the day I arrived here, and was so much in- 
jured that it has not yet been repaired. The one captured by Gen- 
eral Birney was deficient in certain parts. We got from Fernandina 
pieces to replace them, but it has never worked well. As there was 
no means of bringing in the iron I directed it to be destroyed by 
burning and twisting. As soon as the locomotive was repaired I 
brought down all it could haul each day. I will send some up by 
the Cosmopolitan to-day, and the remainder as soon as possible. 
The iron is very heavy ; I fear too heavy for your purpose. I think 
four bars make a ton. I suppose I can send up a couple of hundred 
bars ; perhaps more. 

The enemy in my front have not been re-enforced except by new 
levies made up of old men and boys. They undoubtedly expect 
us to advance, and are prepared to fall back to the Suwannee. The 
people believe we have 8,000 men at Baldwin, but their officers, of 
course, know better. General Jackson, in command, has moved all 
his heavy artillery to the Suwannee except one piece at Lake City. 
I hope to remount my cavalry by this raid. The horses are very 
much broken down. Although the weather is so warm that cam- 
paigning comes very hard on the infantry it is necessary to move at 
once, aS the people, alarmed, are sending their negroes and horses 
out of the country. There has been a kind of depot kept at Fernan- 
dina ; it would be best to break it up, and make the depot either 
here or at Saint Augustine. This is the proper place, in my opinion. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier- General. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 15, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. John P. Hatch, 

Comdg. District of Florida, Jacksonville, Fla. : 
General : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
letter of the 12tli instant. I am directed by the major-general com- 
manding to state that he understood that the extent of your expe- 
dition would depend entirely on the number of troops you had, and 
what you thought you could do with them, and thought that it was 
generally understood that no more troops could be sent to Florida. 



240 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. K'hap. XLVII. 

The commanding general is perfectly satisfied not to have the move- 
ment take place in full force with the infantry at this time. This 
inaction is rendered almost necessary by recent orders received f rotn 
Lieut enant-General Grant, who obliges the general to send more 
troops to Washington. (This is to be kept a secret. ) The major- 
general commanding therefore directs that you send here, with 
the utmost dispatch, one white regiment, with all their camp and 
garrison equipage, to be transferred out of this department. The 
One hundred and second U. S. ("olored Troops will also be re- 
turned to this place as soon as practicable. The major-general 
commanding directs me to say that he expects you to do all you 
can with your remaining force, particularly raiding with the cav- 
alry. Beyond this, of course, you can do but little, and will have 
to remain on the defensive, as will also the other districts in this 
department. You will please be particular to call in all details of 
officers and men belongmg to the white regiment that is to be sent 
north. 

The major-general commanding expects you to carry out the 
original intention of enlisting and organizing the Florida regi- 
ments, as far as you can, and to keep up a loyal feeling amongst 
the inhabitants. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Flag-Steamek Philadelphia, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C, August 16, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Conidg. Dept. of the South, Hdqrs. Hilton Head : 
General : I inclose you a copy of a communication recently re- 
ceived from the Navy Department. It will give me pleasure to 
forward any expression of opinion which you may choose to offer. 
I am, general, very respectfullv, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Bear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron: 

[Inclosure.] 

Navy Department, 
Washington, July 20, 1864. 

Rear- Admiral John A. Dahlgren, 

Comdg. S. A. Blockading Squadron, Port Royal, S. C. : 
, Sir : You will please inform the Department whether any of 
the monitors attached to your fleet can be withdrawn, having due 
regard to the exigencies of the public service within the limits of 
your command ; whether they are absolutely essential to the holding 
possession of the Southern coast ; whether the blockade of Charles- 
ton could be maintained without them, and whether Morris Island 
could be held by the military forces, protected by wooden vessels, in 
case all or a part of the monitors should be withdrawn. This and 
such other information bearing upon the subject as your judgment 
dictates will be furnished to the Department at your leisure. The 



Chap. XLVU.J CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 241 

opinion of the commanding general, an officer of the U. S. En- 
gineers, and of great experience would be valuable and the Depart- 
ment would be gratified if he would address you a letter in answer 
to these inquiries. 

Very respectfully, &c. , 

GIDEON WELLES, 
Secretary of the Navy. 



Office Chief of Aktillert, Northern District, 

Department of the South, 
Morris Island, S. C, August 16, 1864. 
Lieut. W. B. Dean, 

A. A. A. G., Hdqrs. North. Dist., Dept. of the South: 
Sir : I have the honor to report the following number of projec- 
tiles and guns as expended in the bombardment of Fort Sumter from 
August 3 to August 14, inclusive : Three 200-pounder Parrott guns ; 
304 30-pounder Parrott shells, 299 200-pounder Parrott shells, 772 
200-pounder Parrott shells, 13 300-pounder Parrott shells, 219 10-inch 
columbiad shells, 1,465 10-inch mortar shells, 108 13-inch mortar 
shells ; total, 3,180. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

' WM. AMES, 
Lieut. Col. Third M. I. Artillery, 
Chief of Arty., North. Dist., Dept. of the South. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Morris Island, S. C, August 16, 1864. 
Col. A. S. Hartwell, 

Commanding Post, Folly Island: 
Colonel : You will have the Seventy-fourth Pennsylvania Vol- 
unteers relieved and prepared at once to proceed north via Hilton 
Head. Shelter-tents will be taken, the others turned in. The Eocket 
Battery company will be sent to join the regiment. The Cosmo- 
politan will take them to the Head. 
By order of Brigadier-General Schimmelfennig : 

W. B. DEAN, 
Lieut., 127th New York Vols., Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 16, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. John P. Hatch, 

Commanding District of Florida: 
General : I received your letter of the 15th and think your dis- 
positions are very good, and I have no doubt that you will make a 
good haul of horses, mules, &;c. You have by this time received 
the order to send one white regiment to go to Washington and the 
One hundred and second [colored] to this place. Of course the pres- 
ent movements will interfere with the promptitude otherwise attain- 
able in sending them forward, and I shall be content if you send 
them as soon as they come in from the raid. The orders are to rest 
on the defensive, but this does not prohibit all the raids being made 
that promise any adequate results, and I think your safety in Florida 

16 R R — VOL XXXV, PT II 



242 S. C, FLA.; AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVU. 

on the defensive will be to be constantly on the offensive in the way 
of raids, rapid moves, &c. In the rest of the department the quiet 
defensive will be observed. 

General S. , on Morris Island, will have his hands full to guard 
the 600 rebel officers. Please to give the State agents all the facilities 
practicable. They have money in hand, and all that they enlist 
can, as I understand it, be credited to their respective States, while 
the recruits themselves can remain in Florida. 

You are right about the supplies. The basis should be at Fort 
Clinch and Saint Augustine. Very few supplies should be kept at 
Fernandina or Jacksonville, and at other points only sufficient for 
the wants of the troops temporarily at those points. No permanent 
post must be established. The occupation of the country must be 
made by movable columns, never stationary for more than a week 
or two at a time. The reverse policy will surely ensue in one. post 
after another being surprised and captured by the enemy. The 
posts of Yellow Bluff and Picolata are, of course, regarded as neces- 
sary, and have to be garrisoned by a small force, but the least pos- 
sible amount of supplies should be kept eveu at those places. The 
Treasury has shut dowu on all trade at present. I will, however, 
have it reopened as soon as possible, and shall in all ways favor the 
getting the products out of Florida, so as to stimulate the industry 
of the people. 

Yours, respectfully and truly, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Military District of Florida, 

Lahe City, August 16, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. John P. Hatch, 

Comdg. Federal Forces, Jacksonville, East Fla. : 
Sir : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt by ilag of 
truce of your commiinication of the 13th instant, with letters for 
persons within our lines ; and also the arrival of Mrs. Sarah A. Hous- 
ton, and to thank you for courtesy to her. She will at once be 
permitted to join her friends. The letters will be forwarded to 
their address. I send some letters for Confederate prisoners and 
others within your lines, and ask that they may be forwarded ; also 
a small parcel containing some clothes for Sergeant Denham, cap- 
tured in your lines, now reported to be at Hilton Head, to which I 
hope you will give such direction that it may reach him ; also a pack- 
age for Surgeon Wilson, captured by your scouts. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOHN K. JACKSON, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 17, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff, Washington, D. C. : 
General : I have the honior to inclose herewith copy of a letter 
received from Mr. Hy. Meyer, acting consul of Prussia at Charles- 
ton, S. C, requesting permission to allow several hundred aliens to 



Chap. XLVU.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 243 

come within my lines from the State of Georgia, in order to avoid 
the draft recently ordered by the Governor of that State ; also a 
copy of my letter in reply to the same. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTEE, 
Major-General, Commanding. 

[Inclosure No. 1.1 

Prussian Consulate, 
Charleston, S. C, August 11, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Commanding U. S. Forces, Hilton Head, S. C. : 

Sir : In consequence of a proclamation issued by the Governor of 
Georgia, notifying aliens either to perform military duty or to leave 
the State within ten days, a majority of them — probably several 
hundred, if not more — have determined to leave this country at 
once, and have arrived here, waiting for an opportunity to proceed 
on their voyage. The military authorities here are willing to permit 
their departure, provided you consent to receive them within your 
lines. They are mostly mechanics, and amongst them several fami- 
lies without the proper means to make a long stay here or to under- 
take a voyage to the North by the way of Richmond. As an act of 
liumanity you will, I hope, allow them to enter your lines uncondi- 
tionally, and thus forward their views as to their further destina- 
tion. 

Requesting the favor of an early answer, I remain, respectfully, 
general, your obedient servant, the acting consul of Prussia, 

HY. MEYER. 

[Inclosure No. 2.] 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 17, 1864. 
Mr. Hy. Meyer, 

Acting Consul for Prussia, Charleston, S. C. : 
Sir : Your communication of the 11th instant, stating that a con- 
siderable number of aliens, who had arrived in Charleston from the 
State of Georgia, desired to leave the country, and requesting that 
they might be allowed to pass through our lines, has been received. 
As the limitation of time does not allow the reference of your letter 
to the War Department, whence all permissions to cross the lines 
have, as a general rule, to be obtained, I take the responsibility of 
admitting all those who are included in the conscription for military 
service by the Governor of Georgia. For other persons a pass will 
have to be obtained from the honorable Secretary of War at Wash- 
ington. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Judge- Advocate's Office, Dept. of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 17, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. John G. Foster, U..S. Army, 

Commanding Department of the South; 
General : I have the honor to report that ii^ obedience to your 
instructions of August 6, instant, directing me to accompany Maj. 



244 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVII. 

J. F. Anderson, aide-de-camp, to Port Royal Ferry, for the purpose 
of being introduced to Major Lay, of the Confederate forces, as the 
oiBcer who would in future conduct all exchange of prisoners 
at this point, I proceeded on the 16th instant with Major Anderson 
to the designated point, and met Major Lay. In conformity with an 
arrangement previously made between Majors Anderson and Lay, I 
took with me 8 Confederate privates and duly exchanged them for 
the same number of U. S. soldiers. I also delivered to Major Lay 
Dr. William Wilson, an assistant surgeon of Villepigue's battery 
(Confederate), who was captured recently in Florida, and had been 
held as a hostage for surgeons of our army, prisoners in the hands 
of the Confederate authorities. Major Lay delivei'ed to me Dr. 
William T, Robinson, surgeon One hundred and fourth Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteers, and Dr. H. S. Turrill, assistant surgeon Seven- 
teenth Connecticut Volunteers, who had been held by them as pris- 
oners. It was then agreed between Major Lay and myself that all 
surgeons and chaplains who might be captured by either army in 
this department should be released as soon as their profession should ' 
be ascertained. 

In obedience to your verbal instructions, given me on the 14th 
instant, I asked Major Lay what authority he had in regard to the 
future exchange of prisoners, and he replied that he was empowered 
to exchange, man for man and rank for rank, as many prisoners of 
war as we would deliver to him in this department. He further 
stated that he was able to exchange a large number of private sol- 
diers, and was directed to facilitate such exchange by all proper 
means. 

I replied that you were personally desirous of exchanging all 
the prisoners of war whom you properly could, and that you had 
written to the War Department at Washington, asking instructions 
upon the entire subject of a further exchange in this department. I 
also promised that should you receive any instructions authorizing 
either a partial or general exchange, you would immediately notify 
Major-General Jones by flag of truce. 

Major Lay informed me that he had with him about 12 officers 
and 20 privates whom he was ready to deliver to me upon the con- 
dition that I would sign a stipulation, in your behalf, to return an 
equal number of officers and men. Under your instructions to close 
up the exchanges already agreed upon, and not to make any arrange- 
ments for future ones until you should receive definite authority 
from Washington, I was compelled, although with regret, to decline 
Major Lay's oiter. 

In conclusion, I would respectfully state that I am fully satisfied 
that an exchange of our officers now confined at Charleston, Savan- 
nah, and Macon can be effected, as also of many of our soldiers who 
are confined and suffering at Andersonville, Ga. The privates re-^ 
ceived by me yesterday unite in describing the condition of their 
late comrades at Andersonville as being pitiful in the extreme. 
They state that they are but half fed, that they are naked, suffering, 
sick, and dying. They beg the Government to at least exchange as 
many of their number as possible, and thus save them from further 
agony. In their prayer 1 respectfully concur. 

I am, general, with great respect, your obedient servant, 

STEWART L. WOODFORD, 
Lieut. Col. 127th N. Y. Vols., Acting Judge-Advocate. 



Chap. XLVn.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 245 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 17, 1864, 
Captain Suter : 

As soon as convenient I desire the fort at Beaufort to be staked 
out and profiled. The quartermaster is ordered to furnish 100 men, 
carpenters and laborers, to do the work of constructing the fort. 
Also, Captain Moore will furnish the laborers for the fort at Spanish 
Wells, which work should be constructed at once. He will also 
furnish 100 laborers and the carpenters for the construction of the 
fort at Mitchelville. 
Yours, &c., 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-Oeneral, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

HiUon Head, S. C, August 17, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. A. Schimmelpennig, 

.Comdg. North. Dist., Dept. of the South, Morris Island, S. C. : 
General : I am instructed by the major-general commanding to 
direct that the investigation into the cause of the failure to support 
Colonel Hoyt, Fifty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers, in his attack 
on Port Johnson, if suspended, be resumed at once, and be continued 
without delay until completed. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Headquarters District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, Fla., August 17, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Commanding Department of the South : 

General : Your instructions to send up a regiment immediately 
for the north will be carried out as soon as they can possibly be 
spared. I propose sending the One hundred and fourth [Pennsyl- 
vania] Regiment, which has but a short time to serve. I cannot 
get them off until the expedition gets in, say on Sunday next. I 
go to-morrow with four companies of that regiment to Palatka to 
await the arrival of the cavalry portion of the scout. To bring 
down the contrabands, &c., I take with me all the steamers ve 
have here, and detain the Island City for the same purpose. If no 
steamer has been sent to take up the regiment, I would suggest that 
the Delaware or Canonicus come down for that purpose. The 
Houghton was formerly assigned to this district. Can the Island 
City be sent to me to remain permanently ? She would be a very 
useful boat, as it is very easy to land cavalry from her. We must 
make up for want of cavalry with steamers, which can land them at 
diilerent points on the river. The prospect for a Florida regiment 
appears good. 

If you could get about 10,000 of the 100-days' men to garrison the 
islands you have enough old troops to completely take possession of 



246 S. C, FLA,, AND ON THE GA, COAST. [Chap. XI.VII 

this State and to destroy the railroad to Savannah. That road once 
destroyed, I think the State wouSd return to its allegiance. I have 
directed Mr. Yulee to be arrested and brought here if possible. He 
is one of those beyond the pale of proclamation, but is said to be 
hostile to Davis, and might be induced to head a movement for 
a reconstruction if the President would pardon him. I thought it 
worth trying for. Refugees continue to flock in. We will soon have 
a large portion of the people of Florida east of the Saint John's 
River. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, August 17, 1864. 
Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Assistant Adjutant-Oeneral, Department of the South : 
Captain : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of yours 
of the 15th instant. The One hundred and fourth Pennsylvania 
Regiment is the one assigned by me to be sent north. It will leave 
here on Sunday if the movement now being made is at that time 
completed. I intend to hold Magnolia as a point from which to 
start out cavalry raids, as it turns Baldwin. I think its occupation 
will prevent any movement on this place, and also the occupation of 
Baldwin by any small force. The cavalry will be used as fully as 
tlieir horses will allow of. I hope to organize one company of Flor- 
idians immediately on the return of the present raid. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters District op Florida, 

Jacksonville, August 17, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. John K. Jackson, 

Commanding Confederate Forces, East Florida: 
General : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
letter of the 14th instant in regard to a Mrs. Price and another lady, 
supposed by you to have been murdered. If troops of this com- 
mand are charged with the ofllenses mentioned by you, it will be my 
duty to my Government to investigate the circumstances and bring 
the guilty to punishment. How the matter can officially interest 
you or your predecessor in command I am unable to say. Mrs. Price 
was the wife of a loyal American citizen ; she and her friend visited 
this town and were admitted in it as loyal citizens. The case is 
therefore one solely connected with this command, and cannot be 
made the subject of official correspondence with you. Believing, 
however, that you, equally with myself, will endeavor to prevent 
outrages of this character being committed by our respective forces; 
I feel it my duty to inform you that facts developed during the in- 
vestigation lead to the supposition that if the^e women were out- 
raged and murdered it was probably done by a Confederate scouting 



Chap. XLVn.] CORBESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 247 

party. This is strengthened by the circumstance that, although 
search has been carefully made in the vicinity of the picket-line for 
the bodies of the women, they cannot be found. 
Very respectfully, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 18, 18G4. 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff, Washington, D. C. : 

General : I am sending every man that can possibly be spared. 
This will leave me very weak, but I can take care of the department 
with what remains, and if the rebels attack us, -which I consider out 
of the question, I will show them a revised edition of Little Wash- 
ington. I have thought it my duty to send good and tried regiments. 
Those sent in this second brigade are all whites and old, well-tried 
troops, most of them veterans. I hope my active efforts to meet 
General Grant's wishes at this time may be effective in securing me, 
as soon as cold and healthy weather sets in, a sufficient f orc6 to take 
Charleston and Savannah. I am sure that this can be done at any 
time that the Governnient orders it. 

The regiments sent now — four in number — report as follows, very 
nearly, viz : 



Command. 


Men. 

400 
500 
500 


Effectives. 


41,st New York Volunteers .. .'. 


300 


103d New York Volunteers 


370 




350 


White regiment from Florida 


(') 










Total 




1,300 







About the exchanges I have sent on full documents. The rebels 
ai'e anxious to exchange. They say that their desire is that two old 
regular officers like Jones and myself may have charge of the matter, 
so that it may be fairly done without any political jars and inter- 
ruptions. They desire to have all exchanged, both officers (1,800) 
and men (37,000). Although the men are not'now in General Jones' 
command, lie can have them sent forward at any time. Jones seems 
well disposed, so our released prisoners say. He sent an apology to 
General Wessells for placing the 600 officers unde^r fire in Charleston. 
He stated that he did not place them there to be under fire, but that 
they were merely en route. The truth is they ai'e so short of men as 
guards that they have no place to put their prisoners in except 
Charleston and Savannah. If an exchange is authorized I shall 
specify tliat those in Charleston be first exchanged, and that no others 
be placed there. As far as injury to them goes there can be none, 
for I know their exact position and direct the shells accordingly. 
As soon as the rebel officers arrive I shall place them immediately 
on Morris Island between Wagner and Gregg. 

I wish to say one word about the administration of this depart- 
ment. I find many glaring abuses which have been in existence 
for a long time. They are in all the departments, and the United 
States has been systematically swindled. I am trying to remedy 



248 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. . [Chap. XLVn. 

these evils as rapidly as possible, and the smallness of the force will 
make this easy. I only want a regular officer at the head of each 
of the three departments, the quartermaster's, the commissary, and 
the medical. I have written private letters to ask for such officers. 

We have so knocked Fort Sumter that it is almost insupportable to, 
the small garrison. The closeness of their bomb-proofs, the breach 
which the sea makes at high tides into the fort, and the abundance 
of rats and other vermin make the garrison often come out on the 
open ramparts, exposed to our fire, in preference to remaining in 
their casemates. We shall soon render the fort an easy prey. 

The health of the command is quite good, considering the ex- 
tremely hot weather. Many officers give out from the heat and 
sickness, and have to be furloughed. I have full information of 
the enemy's strength and intentions. They are afraid of us, and 
the brigade brought- from Atlanta at the John's Island raid is still 
retained at Charleston, so that our movement resulted in a small 
permanent reduction of the enemy's force at Atlanta. The defenses 
of Charleston and Savannah are mainly garrisoned by the militia, 
of which considerable numbers have come in in obedience to the 
calls of the Governor of Georgia and Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones. 

There is a growing discontent and misery in the enemy's lines. 
Every one is trying to get out through our lines. I refuse all except 
refiigees and deserters and their immediate families. I have also 
permitted the arms-bearing aliens to come over the lines, at the 
request of the acting Prussian consul at Savannah. 

Very respectfully and truly, yours, ' 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 18, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff, Washington, D. C. : 
General : I sent this day, per steamers Arago and Cosmopolitan, 
two old regiments, the One hundred and third New York Volun 
teers and the Seventy-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers, with orders 
to the commanding officers to stop at Fort Monroe, Va., and tele- 
graph from that place their arrival en route to Washington. These 
regiments number in the aggregate some 1,100 men, but in the 
effective about 680. Still they are old and well-seasoned troops 
and well officered. I feel confident that they will accomplish as 
much as new regiments of much larger size. The Forty-first New 
York Volunteers left here last night in steamer John Rice, with 
orders similar to those given to Colonel Heine. I have been obliged , 
to take the Arago off her usual route, as I have at present no other-- 
tiansportation suitable for the purpose of conveying troops outside. 
I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 

P. S. — I find that I cannot get the Seventy -fourth Pennsylvania 
Volunteers upon the Arago, owing to the number of discharged 
convalescent men on board. The Seventy-fourth will be sent on the 
steamer Cosmopolitan to-night. 



Chap. XLvn.] COEEESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 249 

Flag-Steamer Harvest Moon, 
PoH Royal Harbor, S. C, August 18, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. Q. Foster, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Headquarters Hilton Head: 
General : Conformably to the understanding between us, I have 
caused some 11-inch guns to be landed on Morris Island, and I am 
told that the platforms and appliances are nearly in readiness to 
receive the guns, so that it may be possible to open fire next week. 
Please to inform me whether you still desire that I should send men 
and officers to work the guns. If so, I will cause a detail to be made 
for that purpose. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 18, 1864. 
Rear-Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Present: 
Admiral : I have received your letter of the 18th in relation to 
the 11 -inch guns for Morris Island. I certainly desire, in accord- 
ance with our understanding, that you shall furnish men, officers, 
and ammunition for this battery, and I shall be pleased to know 
that you can do so. I have given orders to General Schimmelfennig 
to this effect, and also that the ammunition, &c., shall be transported 
to the battery from the landing, whether at Light-House Inlet or on 
the beach. I respectfully suggest that the senior officer ordered to 
the battery have orders to consult with General Schimmelfennig as 
to the point to be fired at, general rate of firing, precautions against 
surprise, &c. In all matters pertaining to the immediate command 
of his men and guns he will, of course, be upon his own responsi- 
bility. Being a joint labor it will be better to be in perfect accord, 
so that the army and naval batteries side by side may only compete 
in excellence of firing and discipline. 

Very respectfully and truly, yours, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. op the South, 

Morris Island, S. C, August 18, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Commanding Department of the South: 
General : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
letter of the 16th instant, containing orders in regard to the transfer 
of two regiments from here north and one regiment to Hilton Head, 
and in regard to the laying out of a prisoner's camp north of Fort 
Strong. In accordance with your order I have spoken fully on the 
subject with Lieutenant Robinson, of your staff, and hope that my 
arrangements will meet your wishes and the necessities of the case. 
I have ordered to Hilton Head, in order to go north, the Seventy- 
fourth Pennsylvania Volunteere and the One hundred and third 
New York Volunteers, both brave regiments and experienced sol- 
diers, the greater part of whose men, however, the department would 



250 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVU. 

have lost in the fall by reason of expiration of term of service. 
The loss of these two regiments, the loss of the Thirty -second U. S. 
Colored Troops, and the employment of the Fifty -fourth Massachu- 
setts Volunteers for prisoners' guard will require considerable 
changes in my position, excludes all thoughts of even partial and 
occasional ofEensive movements, and precludes also the continuance 
of building new works, &c., as I have no soldiers left for fatigue 
duty. 

In regard to the prisoners' camp north of Fort Strong, I consider 
it my duty to state that, in my opinion, the measure is dangeroiis. 
Fifty men I could easily guard, but 600 constitutes a force which, 
even without arms, may by accident provfe disastrous when placed 
between forts and batteries which I cannot consider strictly secure 
against an assault. The enemy's pet project of a surprise and cap- 
ture of Fort Strong and our front batteries would have more appar- 
ent promise of success, especially now that he has a force nearly 
double our own opposed to us. Nevertheless, I shall proceed with 
all the preparations for a prisoners' camp, hoping, however, that it 
may, like our late plan of exposing their officers to fire, result in an 
arrangement satisfactory to both parties. 

I have the honor to be, with the highest respect, your obedient 



servant. 



A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 
Brigadier-General., Commanding District. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 19, 1864. 
Rear- Admiral John A. Dahlgeen, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron: 

Sir : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your commu- 
nication of the 16th instant, covering a copy of a letter from the 
honorable Secretary of the Navy to yourself, under date of July 
20th, ultimo. In this letter he does me the honor to state that the 
Navy Department would be pleased to have me address you a com- 
munication in reply to certain inqtiiries therein contained, which 
inquiries are as follows : 

First. Can "any of the monitors attached to your fleet be with- 
drawn, having due regard to the exigencies of the public service 
within the limits of your command ?" 

Second. Are they (the monitors) "absolutely essential to the hold- 
ing possession of the Southern coast?" 

Third. Can ' ' the blockade of Charleston be maintained without 
them?" 

Fourth. Can "Morris Island be held by the military forces, pro- 
tected by wooden vessels, in case all or part of the monitors shall •■ 
be withdrawn ?" 

Permit me to express to the Navy Department, through yourself, 
my sense of the compliment which the h morable Secretary has thus 
been pleased to pay me. In all considerations of the amount of force, 
whether military or naval, necessary to be kept upon this coast, it 
should be steadily held in view that the foothold already won must 
be retained. Charleston and Savannah should always be regarded 
as being sooner or later necessary objects of attack. Their value 
as bases from which to strike at the interior lines of the Confederacy 



f 



Chap. XLVll.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 251 

is self-evident. I believe that both or either of these places can be 
taken whenever as large an army can again be sent here from points 
which are just now more vital as Major-General Gillmore had when 
he left this department. But of course our present depots and land- 
ing points must be maintained, hence I earnestly advise the reten- 
tion, under all circumstances, of siich a naval force as will insure 
our present occupancy of the coast. The land force now under my 
command is inadequate to make any aggressive movement. I do 
not even regard it as sufiBcient to make a successful joint advance 
should the navy attack Charleston at the present time. Under exist- 
ing circumstances, therefore, I believe that nothing aggressive can 
be successfully attempted at this point without an increase of the 
land forces. Until such additional troops can be sent here, without 
irejudice to the more important operations now going on elsewhere, 

am inclined to the opinion that the naval force can be judiciously 
reduced to whatever point is consistent with a sure maintenance of 
the blockade and the undisturbed occupancy of our present position 
on the coast. 

The determination of that exact point is, of course, a purely naval 
question ; so important, however, are the positions now held by us, 
and so great is the value of Government property accumulated, at 
these points, that, in answer to the first inquiry of the honorable 
Secretary, I would respectfully suggest that should you advise 'any 
reduction of the monitors in your squadron at least four iron-clads 
should be retained. This number would allow two for Charleston 
Harbor and one for Ossabaw Sound, with an extra one to relieve 
either of the others in case of any accident. 

In reply to the second question I would state that, in my judg- 
ment, serviceable iron-clads are in the present reduced condition of 
my army essential to holding possession of the Southern coast. 

Third. I think it doubtful whether the blockade of Charleston can 
be maintained without iron-clads ; but in this connection I beg to 
refer to my answer to the next and last inquiry. 

Fourth. In case of the removal of all the monitors Morris Island 
can certainly be held by the military forces, protected by wooden 
vessels, provided that such wooden vessels are numerous and strong 
enough to prevent the rebel iron-clads from coming outside of 
Charleston bar. Should the wooden vessels be unable to prevent 
the rebel iron-clads from proceeding to sea I still think that my 
forces could occupy Morris Island until re-enforcements could be 
obtained, but I should apprehend the danger of a successful attack 
upon such of our positions as are undefended by regular and strong 
fortifications, as, for example, Beaufort and the naval and army 
store-houses and shops at Saint Helena, as I do not regard the forti- 
fications at the entrance of this harbor as sufficient to prevent the 
passage of iron-clads. 

I am, with great respect, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General. Commanding. 



Jacksonville, Fla., August 19, 1864. 
Major-General Foster, 

Commanding Department .of the South : 
General: If you have not already sent north the troops you 
intended to send, you will perhaps make some change as to the 



252 e. C, PLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Cbap. XLVO. 

number when I inform you the Seventy-fifth Ohio will be mustered 
out of service next month ; I think on the 5th of the month. This 
will leave us without any cavalry in Florida. The two companies 
of the Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry being now killed or prisoners, 
a white regiment should be mounted as soon as possible and sent 
here. Without cavalry we will be unable to hold even the country 
between the Saint John's and the sea. 

The number of refugees is constantly increasing. The late procla- 
mation of the Governor calling all to arms is bringing them in rap- 
idly. Boys fourteen years of age are called out. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier- General. 

Headquartees Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 20, 1864. 
Brigadier-General Schimmelfennig, 

Commanding Northern District: 
General : I am much gratified to find that you were able to spare 
two of the regiments from your command. The admiral has in- 
formed me that he will provide ofl&cers and men from the navy to 
take charge of the naval battery now being moiinted on Morris 
Island. This battery, of course, will be subject to your general 
orders and directions. I have informed the admiral that all trans- 
portation of guns, iinplements, ordnance, and commissary stores for 
the battery will be furnished by the army. I desire you to give them 
all proper facilities for this purpose. Arrangements for completing 
the inclosure for the prisoners are all made, and the lumber will be 
shipped at once. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-Oeneral, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Morris Island, S. C, August 20, 1864. 
Capt. J. F. Green, U. S. Navy : 

Sir : I have the honor to herewith return the sextant you so kindly 
loaned me, with my best thanks. Allow me at the same time to con- 
vey to you the expression of my thanks and appreciation for the 
various facilities that you have always so readily furnished me. The 
submarine fuse obtained from you I have found to work admirably. 
The clock-work torpedoes have in all my experiments proved a fail- 
ure. I attribute the main cause of this to the fact that the spring 
which brings down the hammer on tlie nipple does not exercise force 
enough to explode the cap. This was proved to be the case in a 
large number of experiments. Otherwise I think those torpedoes 
may be made to worir, and that some of the mechanics here may so 
change the machinery as to effect this purpose. If possible, I should 
like to obtain from you 25 yards more of the submarine fuse and 
three torpedoes. 

I have the honor to be, with the highest respect, your obedient 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding District. 



Chip. ILVn.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 253 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 20, 1864. 
Capt. George R. Hurlbut, 

Comdg. Bait. Fov/rth Mass. Cav., Hilton Head, 8. C: 
Captain : The major-general commanding directs that you use 
every facility in your power to arrange matters so that your battal- 
ion can move at the earliest possible notice. You will take all your 
horses, arms, and equipments and camp and garrison equipage with 
you. The major-general commanding further directs that you leave 
behind at this post 1 commissioned officer and 25 enlisted men with 
the necessary non-commissioned officers for the same. On arriving 
at Jacksonville, you will immediately report to Brig. Gen. J. P. 
Hatch, in person. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

THOMAS J. ROBINSON, 
First Lieut. , Twenty-first U. S. Colored Troops, A. A. A. G. 



Headquarters District of West Florida^ 

Barrancas, August 20, 1864. 
Maj. C. T. Christensen, 

Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Div. of West Mississippi : 

Major : I have the honor to submit, in connection with my report 
of August 12, No. 846, the following additional information received 
from refugees and deserters : 

There is a force of from 8,000 to 9,000 men at Mobile, mostly con- 
scripts, boys and old men, enlisted and armed as infantry, but 
ordered for duty on the fortifications around the city as heavy artil- 
1 ery. They are constructing new obstructions in Mobile Bay, starting 
at the lower part of the city above Choctaw Point and bringing 
them in half circle up to the mouth of the Tensaw River, placing 
new batteries behind them in the marshy ground. They have also 
two new batteries above the forking of the Apalache and Blakely 
Rivers, one battery with seven guns and the other with five ; one 
.■i2-pounder rifled gun in each. It takes one hour to run with steam 
from the new batteries to the Tensaw Railroad Station, where 350 of 
a Mississippi infantry regiment and 100 militia are stationed. Colonel 
Withers commanding. Along the railroad to Pollard every trestle- 
work is well guarded. General Maury is in command at Pollard, 
with 3,000 troops and eight pieces of artillery at his disposal. His 
advanced guard, 400 to 500 strong, all cavalry, is encamped this side 
Silver Spring with commissary stores at Widow Lawson's place and 
at Pine Barren Bridge. 

The rebel camps this side Fort Morgan are deserted, all the cav- 
alry having been ordered from Camp Withers and Powell, partly 
to Perdido Mill, west side of the river, and partly to Pine Barren 
Bridge, this side of the Perdido. At Milton there is one company 
of cavalry scouting down to the Blackwater River. Torpedoes are 
placed in the Escambia from Cotton Ferry upward and in the Black- 
water River below and above Milton. The torpedoes were made at 
Mobile. 

General Page, in command at "Fort Morgan, reported to General 
Dabney H. Maury that he would hold the fort to the last man, and 
that it was not with his consent that Fort Powell was evacuated and 



254 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVH. 

Fort Gaines surrendered. Lieutenant-Colonel Williams, Twenty- 
first Alabama Infantry, late commander at Fort Powell, is under 
arrest for evacuating the fort. 

Very respectfully, major, your obedient servant, 

ASBOTH, 
Brigadier- General. 



City Point. August 21, 1864—5 p. m. 
Secretary op War, 

Washington : 
Please inform Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster that in no circiimstances 
will he be authorized to make exchange of prisoners of war. Ex- 
changes simply re-enforce the enemy at once, whilst we do not get 
the benefit of those received for two or three months, and lose the 
majority entirely. I telegraph this from just hearing that some 500 
or 600 more prisoners had been sent to Major-General Foster. - 

U. S. GRANT, 
Lieutenant- General. 



Washington, August 23, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Department of the South : 
General : The Secretary of War approves of your course in per- 
mitting aliens, who are bona fide leaving the rebel States to avoid 
conscription, to pass through your lines. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. W. HALLECK, 
Major-General and Chief of Staff, 



Hdqrs. District op Florida, Dept. op the South, 

Jacksonville, August 22, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Commanding Department of the South : 
General : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
letter of August 11, 1864. The One hundred and fourth [Pennsyl- 
vania] Regiment is sent with the steamer that takes this. The One 
hundred and second [colored] will be sent by first opportunity. 
The recent capture of our cavalry will render it necessary that 
more be furnished me from without the district until I can raise a 
Florida regiment. You direct that I shall establish no new post. 
I am now building a post at Magnolia, a small but strong fort. It^' 
was my intention to put Colonel Montgomery's regiment there and 
have him bushwhack. He understands the business, and, assisted 
by a company of Floridians, would do more to keep the enemy from 
taking the offensive than any other course I can suggest. If, how- 
ever, you think it best, I will destroy the work and abandon the 
Elace. It is completely under the fire of the gun-boats, and one is 
ept there by the commander of the squadron. 
Picolata I intend to strengthen materially, and your instructions 
not to place large amounts of stores at either place will be complied 
with. It is my intention to strengthen the works at this place ma- 



Chap. XLVD.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 255 

terially, and I hardly think it probable that the enemy will ever 
think the place of sufficient importance to besiege it regularly. You 
speak of making Fort Clinch a port of entry. As all the business 
would be done at Jacksonville, it appears to me that this should be 
the place. I am inclined to believe that the agents of the Treasury, 
here and elsewhere in this department, are more desirous of making 
money for themselves than they are to assist the loyal people of the 
State. Without sharing in the profits of those who work, they will 
not assist them. I will address you a letter on the recruiting the 
raw regiment. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 

[Indorsement.] 

All the cavalry that can possibly be spared from the other dis- 
tricts, in fact almost all in the department, is now in Florida. I 
have even dismounted officers and clerks to send 30 extra horses. 
No further losses of animals can be replaced. 

My opinion of the establishment of posts has been given in letters. 
I defer to any difference of opinion in the commander of the dis- 
trict, but he must regard himself as responsible for any unfortu- 
nate losses arising from variation from my order. 

As to port of entry, this, wh,en once established, has to be main- 
tained by the Government for the benefit of all nations. Jackson- 
ville is not a good defensible point, and the Government will not 
undertake to hold it as a port of entry. Fort Clinch is a fortified 
point intended to be held always by the United States. It is the 
only really proper point for a port of entry in Florida. It has am. 
interior water communication to Jacksonville, which will allow the 
exit of produce. I am willing to recommend Fort Clinch, but no 
other port in Florida, as port of entry. 

J. G. F. 



General Orders, ) Hdqbs. Department of the South, 

No. 123. J Hilton Head, S. C, August 33, 1864. 

The number of idle persons, of both sexes, found loitering around 
the camps and posts of the Districts of Beaufort and Hilton Head is 
subversive of good order and military discipline, and is a fruitful 
source of vice and disease. 

The provost-marshals of these districts are therefore directed to 
arrest all such persons, either white or black, within the military 
lines of" their respective districts, and to place them on police, sani- 
tary, or such other duty as the commanding officer of the district 
may direct. The provost-marshals will also report all colored per- 
sons arrested under this order to the superintendent of contrabands, 
and will hold them subject to his orders. 

The provost-marshal-general of the department will see this order 
promptly and rigidly enforced. 

Bv command of Mai. Gen. J. G'. Foster : 

/ W. L. M. BURGEE, 

Assistant Adjutant-General. 



256 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XUVU. 

Headquaetbes Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 23, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff, Washington, D. C. : 
General : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
letter of the 11th instant directing me, by order of Lieut. Gen. tj. S. 
Grant, to send forward all the troops I could possibly spare. In reply 
I have to state that I have already sent to Washington, in com- 
pliance with these instructions, the Forty-first and One hundred 
and third Regiments New York Volunteers and the Seventy-fourth 
Pennsylvania Volunteers. The One hundred and fourth Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteers will be sent forward as soon as it arrives from 
the Florida District ; it is hourly expected. These are old and well- 
tried regiments and will do good service. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 23, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. A. Schimmelpennig, 

Comdg. Northern District, Department of the South : 

General : I am directed by the major-general commanding to 
state he has ordered Captain Suter, chief engineer. Department of 
the South, to proceed to Morris Island for the purjjose of consulting 
with you in regard to the location of the camp for the prisoners of 
war daily expected in this department from the North. The major- 
general commanding desires that this camp be placed between Fort 
Strong and Battery Putnam. If this position is considered too dan- 
gerous you are authorized to locate the camp wherever yourself and 
Captain Suter shall deem the best and safest from any attack of the 
enemy. Should it be necessary to have mure troops to guard these 
prisoners (600), another regiment can be sent from this place. Still, 
it is desired that they may be guarded by the force at present in the 
Northern District, if it is possible, as we want all the troops at this 
place that we now have here. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 
Morris Island, S. C, August 24, 1864. 

Col. A. S. Hartwell, 

Commanding, Folly Island: 

The general commanding directs that you select 2 commissioned 

officers and 50 men for a special duty. They will proceed as soon as 

practicable to Long Island and encamp near the fort, where they 

will receive further orders. They will probably be absent from 



Chap. XLVn.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 257 

camp a week and should take rations, &c., accordingly. This party 
will doubtless be called upon to meet the enemy in boats, and the 
general wishes you to select them with that view. 
Very respectfully, 

W. B. DEAN, 
Lieut., 127th New York Volunteers, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen. 



Headquarters District of West Florida, 

Barrancas, August 24, 1864. 
Maj. C. T. Christensen, 

Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Mil. Div. of West Mississippi : 
Major : I have the honor to submit, in connection with my report 
of 20th instant. No. 876, the following additional information re- 
ceived from refugees and deserters relative to the movements of the 
enemy : 

All of the Fifteenth Confederate and Seventh Alabama Cavalry 
at Pine Barren Bridge and this side of the Escambia River, as well 
as the two companies at Milton, have been ordered to the Tensaw 
River—partially replaced by new militia companies of boys and old 
men. The news from Atlanta was discouraging to the rebels, and 
they had given up all hopes of holding the place. Rumors were also 
prevalent that Grant had been successful at Petersburg. This in- 
formation dates to the 16th instant. 

Very respectfully, major, your obedient servant, 

ASBOTH, 
Brigadier- General. 



Special Orders, ) War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 279. [ Washington, August 24, 1864. 

* * * * * * * 

3. On being relieved from his duties as depot quartermaster at 
Memphis, Tenn., Col. A. R. Eddy will proceed without delay to 
Hilton Head, S. C, and report in person to Major-General Foster, 
commanding, and enter upon his duties as chief quartermaster of 
the Department of the South, under his appointment of August 6, 

1864. 

« ****** 

By order of the Secretary of War : 
•^ E. D. TOWNSEND, 

Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Hdqrs. Dept. of S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 

Charleston, S. C, August 25, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Commanding Department of the South, Hilton Head : 

General : I received your letter of the 21st instant yesterday. 

The U. S. soldiers, prisoners of war at Andersonville, Ga., are in no 

way whatever under my control, and I therefore cannot undertake 

to deliver them the sanitary stores you desire to send without the 

17 R R— VOL XXXV, FT II 



258 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

sanction of the officer having charge of the prisoners. I have re- - 
ferred the matter to him, and feel quite sure that he will not hesi- 
tate to allow the stores to be sent to them. I cannot permit any 
prisoner to take charge of the stores and act as quartermaster to 
distribute them, but if the officer having charge of the prisoners 
will permit them to be delivered I will designate an officer to re- 
ceive and receipt to the proper officer of your command for them, 
and hold him to as strict an accountability for their proper delivery 
as though they were stores belonging to my Government. 

I will communicate with you further on this subject when I re- 
ceive a reply from the officer to whom I have referred your reqviest. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

SAM. JONES, 
Major- General, Commanding. 

By an oversight on the part of some one in my office this letter 
was not forwarded as it should have been by the flag of truce the 
day after its date. It is now respectfully forwarded. 

SAM. JONES, 
Major- General. 



Headquarters District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, Fla. , August 25, 1864. 
Col. W. H. Noble, 

Commanding at Magnolia: 
Colonel : The brigadier-general commanding directs the follow- 
ing disposition to be made of the Seventeenth Connecticut Volun- 
teers : 

The regiment will form the garrison at Saint Augustine and Pico- 
lata. Six companies, including the smallest companies, to take post 
at Saint Augustine, under tlie command of the lieutenant-colonel of 
the regiment ; four companies to be stationed at Picolata, under 
the command of the major of the regiment. You will remain for 
the present in command of the forces at Magnolia. 
By order of Brig. Gen. John P. Hatch : 

EDWARD L. ROGERS, 
Major lOUh Pennsylvania Vols., A. A. A. G. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 26, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, ,; 

Chief of Staff, Washington, D. C. : 
General : I inclose some late rebel papers. The late little disas- 
ter in Florida seems to prove that it is doomed ever to be the land 
of military misfortune. The troops there will now remain strictly 
on the defensive. My force now is very small for the number of 
points to be guarded. I have literally obeyed the order to send evci-y 
man that I possibly could... I have no doubt but I can get along with 
what I have as long as the enemy's force in frOnt is also weak. The 
regiment sent on the Fulton is the One hundred and fourth Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteers, 900 men, just from Florida. Their time is nearly 



Chap. XLVII.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 259 

out, but this is the case with all tlio white regiments here. The 
Forty-first New York and Seventy-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers 
were mainly veterans. 

I have sent you the last letters from Jones. The rebels are anxious 
to exchange, probably to obtain men to re-enforce Hood. I have re- 
ceived no answer to my request to General Samuel Jones to be allowed 
to send comforts and necessaries to the prisoners at Andersonville.* 
I shall take the rebel prisoners to Morris Island to-morrow. ■ 
Very respectfully and truly, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Flag-Steamer Philadelphia, 
Port Royal Harbor, 8. C, August 26, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Comdg. Department of the South, Hdqrs. Hilton Head : 
General : In a recent expedition several citizens of Mcintosh 
County, Ga. , were brought away, who it appears were not engaged in 
any hostile operations against the Government, but were pursuing 
their ordinary vocations ; 2 of them were small farmers and 5 were 
engaged in making salt. From what 2 of iSiem tell me they have 
never taken an active part at any time. in defending the rebels, and 
the 2 farmers are men of over sixty yeal's of age. They were found 
at their homes and were probably brought away as a measure of pre- 
caution. Will you please inform me whether you have instructions 
from the Government in relation to persons so situated, and who 
may fall into your hands. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGEEN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Flag-Steamer Philadephia, 
Port Royal Harbor, August 26, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Comdg. Department of the South, Hdqrs. Hilton Head: 
Sir : In compliance with your request a gun-boat will be detailed 
to convoy to Charleston the vessel with the rebel prisoners. Will 
you please by signal give me an hour's notice, so that the movements 
of your steamer may not be delayed ? Captain Green will also be 
instructed to keep a vessel of war near the prisoners' vessel. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Quartermaster-General's Oppice, 

Washington CUy, August 27, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Comdg. Department of the South, Hilton Head, S. C. : 
General : Your letter of the 17th instant, inclosing drawings of 
an " assaulting galley" which you propose to build, and a requisi- 
tion from J. H. Moore, assistant quartermaster, for quartermaster's 

* See postscript to Jonea' letter of August 25, p. 358. 



260 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVII. 

stores (iron), were referred to Major-General Halleck, Chief of Staff, 
who returned them with the following indorsement : 

August 26, 1864. 
By direction of General Grant, General Foster has been repeatedly ordered to con- 
fine himself strictly to the defensive, and to send north all troops not required for 
holding his present position without offensive operations. 
Requisition disapproved. 

H. W. HALLECK, 
Major-General and Chief of Staff. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

M. C. MEIGS, 
Quartermaster -General and Brevet Major-General. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 28, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. John P. Hatch, 

Comdg. District of Florida, Jacksonville, Fla. : 

General : I am instructed by the major-general commanding to 
acknowledge the receipt of your letter * of the 19th instant giving 
the particulars, in part, of the unfortunate affair at Gainesville, 
Fla., in which we lost so many officers and men. Your letter* of 
the 23d instant was received same day, giving further particulars of 
the disastrous affair, and requesting that a further re-enforcement 
of cavalry be sent to you from without your district. 

The major-general commanding directs me to say that all the 
cavalry that can possibly be spared from the other districts, in fact 
almost all in the department, is now in Florida. Officers and clerks 
have been dismounted in order to send you 30 extra horses. No 
further loss of animals can be replaced. 

In regard to the establishment of new posts in your district the 
opinion of the commanding general has been fully given in former 
letters to you. The major-general commanding defers to any differ- 
ence of opinion with the commanding officer of the District of 
Florida, who must regard himself as responsible for any unfortunate 
losses arising from variation of orders from these headquarters. 

In regard to ports of entry, these, when once established, have to 
be maintained by the Government at all hazards for the benefit 
of all nations. Jacksonville is not considered a good defensible 
point, and the Government will not undertake to hold it as a port 
of entry. Fort Clinch is a fortified point intended to be held 
always by the U. S. Government. It is the only really proper point 
for a port of entry in Florida, except it might be Saint Augustine. 
Fort Clinch has an interior water communication to Jacksonville, 
which will allow the exit of produce. The major-general com- 
manding is willing to recommend Fort Clinch or Saint Augustinp 
as ports of entry, but no other ports in Florida. 

In regard to the retention of the Island City the major-general 
commanding directs me to say that -the Neptune and Wyoming are 
much better boats artd will be sent to replace her. The repeated 
losses of boats in Florida create a feeling adverse to sending other 
than the oldest and least valuable boats to that district. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. L: M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 

* See Part I, pp. 427, 429. 



Chap. XLVII.] CORRESPONDEKCE, ETC. UNION. 261 

Hdqrs. Dept. op S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 

Clifxrieston, 8. C, August 29, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Commanding U. S. Forces, Hilton Head, 8. C. : 
General : I have the honor to inclose the within letters for your 
consideration, at the request of the parties interested. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

SAM. JONES, 
Major-General, Com.manding. 

[Inclosure No. 1.] 

Columbia, S. C, August 12, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, 

Commanding 8outhern Army ; 

Sir : I am one of the unfortunate prisoners of war now confined 

at this place. I would ask you if there is a likelihood of an early 

exchange through your department, and, if so, you will cause my 

transfer to Charleston, so I may be exchanged as early as possible. 

Truly, 

E. G. MARSHALL, 
Col. Fourteenth New York Arty, and Capt. U. 8. Army. 

[Inclosure No. 3.] 

Charleston, S. C, August 29, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Commanding U. 8. Forces, Hilton Head: 

Sir : In Major Anderson's reply to my letter of the 1 1th instant, 
he says that permission to cross your lines must come from the hon- 
orable Secretary of War. I did not understand from this whether I 
was to make the application or you would do it for me. But sup- 
posing that I was to do it, I have written a letter to the Secretary of 
War which,- together with this line. General Jones kindly consents 
to forward to you. The urgency of my case compels me to trouble 
you the second time. When a man is conscious that not only the 
welfare of family friends, but the life of a dear daughter, an only 
child, is at stake, he must not be blamed for importunity. 

Do, my dear sir, permit my letter to the Secretary of War to be 
forwarded, and interpose your kind offices in my behalf, and speak 
any kind word you may have it in your power to do, to further my 
wishes to return home. It will be a word and a deed for humanity's 
sake, and will be remembered with lasting gratitude by one who has 
the honor to be, dear sir, your obedient servant,, 

THOMAS O. RICE. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, 8. C, August 30, 1864. 

Rear- Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, 

Comdg. 8. Atlantic Blockading 8quadron, Port Royal, 8. C. : 
Admiral : I have the honor to -request that a gun-boat from your 
squadron be detailed to escort the U. S. steam transport Crescent 
from her present anchorage in this harbor to Charleston. I wish to 



262 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE 6A. COAST. ICbap. XLVII. 

have this steamer, with the persons on board, moved as near to 
Fort Wagner as possible, so that she will be completely in range of 
the guns of that fort and your gun-boats. 

The camp which I am preparing for these prisoners is not finished 
as yet, but will be in the course of a few clays, when they will be 
removed. In the mean time I wish every possible precaution taken 
to prevent the escape of any of these prisoners. 

I have the honor to be, admiral, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

J. G. FOSTEE, 
Major-Oeneral, Commanding. 



Flag-Steamer Philadelphia, 

August 30, 1864. 
General Foster, 

Department of the South: 
General : As your reply by signal this morning led me to sup- 
pose that the convoy for prisoners would not be wanted for two or 
three days, I sent the steamer to her station that had been detained 
for the purpose, which leaves me without a suitable vessel. All 
here are more or less under repairs, and no one will be ready for a 
couple of days. Perhaps I may be able to get a vessel sooner from 
Charleston, of which I will inform you. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN. 



Headquarters District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, August 30, 1864. 
Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Assistant Adjutant-General : 

Captain : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
letter of the 28th instant. I will for the present retain a command 
at Magnolia. I have built a very strong work there. "If it should 
be necessary at any time to abandon it, the troops could be put 
across the river under cover of the guns of the Hale. I am gradu- 
ally strengthening the works at this place, and hope soon to have it 
in such a condition that no force of the enemy can take it. 

I have been informed that it is the intention of the enemy to take 
up part of the railroad west of the Little Saint Mary's, and with 
that iron to complete the branch to connect with the Savannah and 
Gulf road. This mjiy not be true ; if it is, it proves conclusively 
that no attack will be made on thisplace for a long time. 

With reference to making Fort Clinch a port of entry, it did not 
strike me favorably at first, but if it will enable the loyal citizens on 
the Saint John's River to get out the products of their labor, it would 
be a most excellent thing. The Wyoming is better adapted to the 
service here than the Island City, and I am glad that she was sent 
here to replace her. I intend mounting a 3-inch gun on her. A Lieu- 
tenant Gough has frightened a number of Floridians across the line, 
where we may soon expect to find them in arms against us. He is 
stationed at Saint Augustine, and issued a notice to all citizens to 



Chap. XLVIt.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.— tTNION. 263 

enroll themselves for a draft. I have directed him to discontinue 
the enrollment of Floridians, as they are entitled to be considered 
as refugees ; in fact, most of them are such in letter as well as in 
spirit. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 31, 1864. 

Col. C. E. Brayton, 

Tliird Rhode Island Artillery, Chief of Artillery: 
Colonel : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
communication of the 17th instant, giving a report of a tour of in- 
spection through the Northern District, Department of the South, 
and to state that it was referred to Brigadier-General Schimmel- 
fennig with your recommendation approved, and returned to these 
headquarters with the following indorsement : 

Hdqrs. Northern District, Department of the South, 

Morris Island, S. C, August 23, 1864. 
Respectfully forwarded to department headquarters. 
' Orders had already been given by me (General Orders, No. 48, August 16) that 
no garrison of a fort or battery should be changed without special authority from 
these headquarters, unless the troops composing it were ordered away from the 
district. The garrison at Fort Greene was changed through a mistake. The out- 
posts near the fort were ordered to be relieved, and the garrison of the fort was re- 
lieved instead. On discovering the mistake, Colonel Gumey promptly sent back 
the artillerists of the garrison. Some changes in the garrisons have recently taken 
place owing to troops being ordered away from the district. 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 
Brigadier-Oeneral, Commanding IHstrict. 

I have the honor to be, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient 

THOMAS J. ROBINSON, 

First Lieut., Ttvehty-first U. S. Colored Iroops, A. A. A. G. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, August 31, 1864. 

Lieut. John R. McGinness, 

Chief of Ordnance, Department of the South: 

Lieutenant : The verbal orders of the major-general command- 
ing, as issued to you this morning, are now submitted in writing, 
viz : 

Two guns are to be left in charge of the officer commanding the outposts at Jen- 
kins' Island, with the pi-oper supply of ammunition for same, to be used against the 
enemy whenever they show themselves at Chimney Point. 

By command of Mai. Gen. J. G. Foster : 

.. THOMAS J. ROBINSON, 
First Lieut , Twenty-first U. S. Colored Troops, A. A. A. G. 



264 8. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVII. 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 1, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff, Washington, D. C. : 
General : I have the honor to request that a general officer of 
experience may be ordered to this department to report to me for 
duty in the Northern District, to take the place of Brig. Gen. A. 
Schimmelf eniiig, who goes North on this steamer on leave of absence 
on account of severe indisposition, and who I fear will never suf- 
ficiently recover to be able to resume his duties. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 1, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, 

Comdg. Confederate Forces in S. C, Ga., and Fla.: 
General : I inclose herewith a letter for Mr. Hy. Meyer, p.cting 
consul of Prussia, in which you will see that authority has been 
granted me by the honorable Secretary of War to admit all bona- 
fide aliens that may wish to come into our lines to avoid your con- 
scription. I have to request that you will give me timely notice 
when there are any to cross, as I am willing to send a steamer for 
them up the Savannah River, where they will be received. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding, 

[Inclosure.] 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 1, 1864. 
Mr. Hy. Meyer, 

Acting Consul of Prussia at Charleston, S. C. : 

Sir : I have the honor to state that I have received authority from 
the honorable Secretary of War to receive into my lines all bona-tide 
aliens that wish to leave the Confederate States in order to avoid the 
conscription. I have informed General Samuel Jones of this fact, 
and requested him to give me timely notice of his sending them, as 
I will receive them on a steamer to be sent up the Savannah River 
for that purpose if there is a sufficient number to warrant me in so 
doing. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 

Major-General. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 1, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. A. Schimmelpennig, 

Comdg. Northern District, Dept. of the South : 
General : Having granted you a leave of absence for thirty days, 
in consequence of severe indisposition contracted in the line of your 
duties, I feel it incumbent upon me to express my sincere thanks to 



Chap. XLVn.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 265 

yoii for the able, energetic, and efficient manner in which yon have 
conducted the command of the Northern District of this depart- 
ment. I consider you a most excellent officer, of good judgment, 
and one to be intrusted at all times with the care and management 
of large bodies of troops and with the details of a campaign. Your 
opinions and suggestions I have always found to be well-timed and 
to the point. 

Hoping, general, to see you return to your duties again in a short 
time, with your health fully recovered, I remain, general, very 
respectfully, yours, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Special Orders, | Hdqrs. Department op the South, 

No. 319. f Hilton Head, S. C, September 1, 1864. 

******* 

III. Brig. Gen. R. Saxton, .U. S. Volunteers, will on receipt of 
this order proceed immediateljr to Morris Island, S. C, and' relieve 
Brig. Gen. A. Schimmelfennig, commanding Northern District, 
Department of the South, making his headquarters at Morris Island, 
and will in addition retain command of the District of Beaufort. 
Before leaving the District of Beaufort he will turn over the com- 
mand to the senior officer at that post, leaving with him all needful 
instructions as to the command of same. 

******* 
By command of Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster : 

W. L.M. BURGER, 
Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Morris Island, S. C, September 2, 1864. 

Capt. J. F. Green, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding Squadron off Charleston: 

Captain : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
communication of the 31st ultimo, relative to the firing upon a flag- 
of-truce, boat by my batteries. In reply allow me to respectfully 
inform you that my orders from Major-General Foster are to receive 
no flags of truce in this district, and that in compliance with these 
orders I have instructed my pickets and batteries, on the approach 
of a flag of truce, to warn its bearers back by firing twice over their 
heads and the third time to fire sharp. I must therefore beg that in 
case the naval forces wish to communicate by flag of truce they will 
notify me of the same beforehand; otherwise the occurrences of 
August 30 will certainly be repeated. 

I herewith have the honor to be, with the highest respect, your 
obedient servant, 

• A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



^^Q S. C, PLA., AOT) ON THE GA. COAST. (Chap. XLVII. 

Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Morris Island, S. C, September 2, 1864. 
Capt. J. F. Green, U. S. Navy : 

I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of this 
date, inclosing a communication from Admiral Dahlgren with re- 
gard to the rebel prisoners on board a transport off this island. I 
expect to have the camp for these prisoners finished and to be ready 
to receive them on shore within two or three days. 
I am, captain, with the highest respect, 

A. SOHIMMELFENNIG, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, September 2, 1864. 
Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of the South: 
Captain : I have little to report. I am bringing to this point the 
cavalry from Magnolia to refit. The garrison for the present at that 
point will consist of the Thirty-fourth U. S. Colored Troops and 
80 of the Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry. On the 5th instant the time 
of service of the Seventy-fifth Ohio will commence to expire, and 
continue until November, when the whole will be out of service. 

This morning a small body of the enemy's cavalry came within 
sight of the pickets on the King's road and proceeded in the direc- 
tion of Middleburg. Yellow Bluff has been re-enforced by two com- 
panies of the Thirty-fourth U. S. Colored Troops. Major Vignos, 
with two companies of the One hundred and seventh Ohio, has ar- 
rived here, being replaced at Fort Clinch by a good company of the 
Third U. S. Colored Troops, well drilled at artillery practice. The 
present commander at Fort Clinch has the reputation of being a 
good officer, and I hope tlie change will prove beneficial. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant. 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier- General, Com.manding. 

[Indorsement.] 

September 4, 1864. 
The Seventy-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry must be mustered out 
as their times of service expire. Notice must be given General 
Hatch that I desire the garrison of Fort Clinch to be of siich a char- 
acter as to make sure of its perfect safety under all circumstances. 

J. G. FOSTER. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, Sejitember 3, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. R. Delapield, 

Chief of Engineers, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C. : 
General : I have the hoiior to acknowledge the receipt of your 
indorsement of the 19tli of AugiLst, 1864, upon nly letter of the 19th 
ultimo, desiring me to give the particular defects to which I objected 



Chap. XLVn.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 267 

in the plan, &c., of Fort Clinch. In compliance therewith I sub- 
mit the following as the most important, &c. : 

First. Fort Clinch is not, in my opinion, located so as to command 
properly both the anchorage and the entrance channel. This will 
necessitate the erection of outer batteries to command the channel 
near the location of the rebel batteries and also of inner batteries 
to command the harbor. 

Second. The proximity of a range of sand hills to the fort will 
afford cover to an enemy s advance to erect batteries against the fort 
or to assault the fort after a breach has been effected. 

Third. The masonry bastionettes can easily be demolished by the 
rifled guns in use in the army and the flanking arrangements for 
the ditch be thus destroyed. 

Fourth. The chemin de ronde can also be easily knocked down 
with rifled guns, and the ascent of the scarp thus be rendered tolera- 
bly easy to an assaulting column. 

Fifth. The counter sloping glacis will afford greater facilities to 
an enemy's assaulting column than to the garrison. 

The above constitute the main defects, to which I thought it my 
duty to call the attention of the department. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. Dept. op S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 

Charleston, S. C, September 3, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, U. S. Army, 

Comdg. Department of the South, Hilton Head, S. C. : 
General : About 6 p. m. on the 30th ultimo, an officer of the C. 
S. Army left Sullivan's Island in a small boat under flag of truce to 
meet a flag-of -truce boat of the United States which was at anchor 
off Battery Marshall. Whilst passing through Beach Channel, three 
shots were fired from your Morris Island batteries on our flag of 
truce. I presume this was done under some misapprehension on the 
l)art of your subordinates on Morris Island. The matter is brought 
to your notice for such explanation or action as you may think 
proper. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

SAM. JONES, 
Major- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 3, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. R. Saxton, 

Commanding Northern District, Department of the South : 

General : By direction of the major-general commanding I have 
the honor to transmit herewith official copies of reports made to 
and by Rear- Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, commanding South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, in regard to the firing into a flag-of -truce boat 
by our batteries at Morris Island. 



268 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVII. 

The major-general commanding directs that a thorough investiga- 
tion be made in the matter, and that all these papers be returned to 
these headquarters with report in the matter. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 

THOMAS J. ROBINSON, 
First Lieut, Tiventy-first U. S. Colored Troops, A. A. A. G. 

[Inclosure No. 1.] 

Flag-Steamer Philadelphia, 
PoH Royal Harbor, S. C, September 1, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Fostek, 

Commanding Department of the South, Hdqrs. Hilton Head : 
General : I inclose herewith papers just received from the senior 
officer in Charleston Roads, by which it appears that while a flag-of- 
truce boat from the squadron was communicating with a boat bear- 
ing a flag of truce from Sullivan's Island the latter was fired at by 
our batteries on Morris Island. I trust you will at your earliest 
convenience enable me to say that this was a mistake. Please be so 
good as to return the papers. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Inclosure No. 2.] 

U. S. Steamer John Adams, 
Off Morris Island, S. C, August 31, 1864. 
Rear- Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron : 

Sir : I inclose herewith copies of communications from Captain 
De Camp and Acting Ensign McClure in relation to the batteries on 
Morris Island firing upon a rebel flag-of -truce boat while in transit 
to meet our flag-of-truce boat in charge of Acting Ensign McClure, 
anchored off Beach Inlet. I would state that it is unusual for the 
rebel flag of truce to come from Moultrie Point to meet ours off Beach 
Ii.let ; they generally come from the Inlet. 

I have sent a copy of Acting Ensign McClure's statement to Gen- 
eral Schimmelfennig, with a letter from myself stating simply that 
it had been forwarded for his information, and making no comment 
whatever on the proceeding. 

Very respectfully, your ftbedient servant, 

J. F. GREEN, 
Captain and Senior Officer, off Charleston. 

[Inclosure No. 3.] 

U. S. Frigate Wabash, 
Off Charleston, S. C, August 31, 1864. 

Capt. J. F. Green, U. S. Navy, 

Senior Officer, Present: 

Sir : I have the honor herewith to inclose you a communication 
from Acting Ensign McClure, of this ship, who, went yesterday in 
charge of a flag-of-truce boat, agreeably to your order, for the pur- 
pose of delivering a package of letters to the rebel authorities near 



Cbap. XLVII] correspondence, etc. — UNION. 269 

Beach Inlet. You will perceive by Mr. MoClure's report that the 
rebel boat bearing a flag of truce, sent from Sullivan's Island for 
the purpose of communicating with us, was fired upon by our bat- 
teries on Morris Island, a fragment of a shell falling into the rebel 
boat, and other shells bursting over and about her. Comment from 
me is unnecessary. I respectfully place the matter in your hands. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. DE CAMP, 
Captain, Commanding Outer Blockade, off Charleston. 

[Inclosure No. 4.] 

U. S. Frigate Wabash, 
Off Charleston, August 30, 1864. 
Sir : In obedience to your order I proceeded with a flag of truce 
in toward Beach Inlet. When within about 2i miles of the beach I 
cast off from the Winona and pulled in toward the fort at Beach 
Inlet. When within about 1^ miles a shot was fired across our 
bow from the fort, when I immediately anchored. After waiting 
about an hour I noticed a boat sailing around from Fort Moul- 
trie, and soon after steering toward us. It was, how^ever,- too far 
distant for me to distinguish whether it showed a flag of truce or 
not. It had not gone far before our forces on Morris Island com- 
menced firing at it, and I noticed 3 or 3 shells explode directly 
over the boat. I soon after distinguished a small flag of truce, when 
I got under way and stood toward it under sail. On communicating 
I found the boat in charge of Lieut. R. Jones, of General Higgins' 
staff. I delivered the packages to him. He complained very bit- 
terly of our forces on Morris Island firing at him while on his way 
out. I told him I was very sorry anything of the kind had occurred, 
and hoped that everything would soon be satisfactorily explained. 
Our communication here ended, and I returned aboard ship. 
Very respectfully, 

G. M. McCLURE, 

Acting Ensign. 

[Indorsement.] 

Respectfully subniitted to Capt. J. F. Green, senior officer off Mor- 
ris Island, S. C. 

J. DE CAMP, 

Captain, Commanding Outer Blockade. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. op the South, 

Morris Island, S. C, September 4, 1864. 

Col. William Gurney, 

Comrfiandtng Post, Morris Island : 
The general commanding directs that you have two Requa bat- 
teries placed near the camp for rebel prisoners in such a manner 
that they may be-used at once upon the prisoners in case they should 
be needed* Captain Grace, acting ordnance officer, will furnish 
them. 

Very respectfully, 

.W. B. DEAN, 
Lieutenant, 127th New York Volunteers, A. A. A. G. 



270 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVIL 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilion Head, S. C, September i, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. John P. Hatch, 

Comdg. District of Florida, Jacksonville, Fla. : 

General : I have the honor, to acknowledge the receipt of your 
communication of the 3(1 instant, giving report of operations, &c., 
in your district. I am instructed by the major-general command- 
ing to state that he desires the garrison of Fort Clinch to be of such 
, a character as to make sure of its perfect safety under all circum- 
stances. The Seventy -fifth Ohio v olunteers must be mustered out 
of service in accordance with instructions from the War Depart- 
ment sent to the commissary of musters of this department. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 5, 1864. 

Major-General Halleck, U. S. Army : 

General : I inclose you rebel papers of the 3d. I could get no 
others by flag of truce. I am informed by released surgeons, &c. , 
that the papers of the 2d contained news of severe fighting at 
Atlanta. A rebel reporter told Mr. Sawyer, of the Herald, that the 
reports were finally unfavorable to their cause (rebel). 

I have secret information that some of the officers in Charleston 
are to attempt to escape on Wednesday or Thursday night. I shall 
go up to-morrow and be ready to aid them if opportunity occurs. 
At any rate, I propose to attack and capture or drive off their picket- 
boats. 

I propose also to send a strong boat party to enter Dewees Inlet, 
and landing on the mainland in the rear of Mount Pleasant to search 
for any escaped prisoners that may have made their way across the 
Cooper River to Hobcaw Point. 

Very respectfully and trulv, yours, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Flag-Steamer Philadelphia, 

Septemher 5, 1864. 

Major-General Foster, 

Comrnanding Department of the South: 

General : In reply to your note of to-day, it is possible that boats 
might issue from Morris Island after dark and spread themselves in 
the lower harbor, unless the moon be too bright, so that if any of 
our friends got that far they might be helped. Whether any actual 
result could be obtained is rather problematical. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Bear-Admiral. 



Chap. XLVII.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 271 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 5, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, 

Comdg. Confederate Forces, Dept. of S. C, Ga., and Fla.: 
General : I am informed by an officer recently arrived from 
Charleston that James Pike, of the Fourth Ohio Cavalry, and Charles 
R. Gray, of Fifth Iowa Cavalry, are held by you in close confine- 
ment at the jail tower in Charleston, and kept upon a prison diet of 
mush and water. Also that these men have been informed that 
they are held and are to be tried as spies. I further learn that they 
were captured on or about June 5 last, near the Hiwassee River, in 
Southeastern Tennessee or the northwesjtern part of South Carolina, 
and that, when taken, they were wearing our uniform and had arms 
in their hands. If their claim in this respect is true, they are 
entitled to be treated as prisoners of war. I respectfully ask you 
to have their case investigated and extend to them the treatment 
usually accorded to prisoners of war among civilized nations. 
I am, very respectfully, yours, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Com7uanding. 



Office Chief op Artillery, Dept. of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 5, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Commanding Dejjartment of the South: 
General : I have the honor to make the following report of a 
tour of instruction through the District of Florida : 

The garrison of Fort Clinch consists of two cempanies of the One 
hundred and seventh Ohio Volunteers and one company of the Third 
U. S. Colored Troops, recently sent to that post to perform the artil- 
lery duty. This company has had some experience at Jacksonville 
in artillery, and will, in my opinion, make efficient artillerists, they 
having competent instructors. 

The garrisons of the different works at Jacksonville are all in 
excellent condition, being well drilled in the manual of the piece 
and well instructed in the nomenclature of pieces, carriages, imple- 
ments, equipments, ammunition, and ranges of the different objects 
in the vicinity of their respective batteries. The garrison of Fort 
Hatch, Company H, Third U. S. Colored Troops, Capt. S. Conant, 
is particularly conversant with the above points. I am of the opin- 
ion that these works are as efficiently garrisoned as any in the de- 
Eartment, the ranges of different points having been often verified 
y actual practice. 

"The garrison of Fort Marion, at Saint Augustine, I found in quite 
an indifferent condition. The recent raid and absence of a company 
that had been instructed as artillery left the fort without an efficient 
garrison. I would respectfully suggest that a company of the Sev- 
enteenth Connecticut Volunteers be designated to perform the artil- 
-lery duty in this work, and not to be removed unless the regiment 
leaves the post. The frequent change of garrisons and the substitu- 
tion of companies unacquainted with their duties at times when the 
best artillerists are needed for defense perils the safety of the town 
and fort, and renders impossible to maintain a well-instructed and 



272 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVH. 

efficient garrison. I would respectfully state that Company A, 
Third Rhode Island Artillery, has been on all the raids in Florida 
since the battle of Olustee, and its efl&oiency is impaired by a loss of 
horses and material and the addition of 60 new men. The battery 
has had but little opportunity for drill since it was mounted, and 
I am of the opinion that it needs an opportunity for drill not to 
be obtained at Jacksonville. I would therefore request, if it is 
deemed consistent with the good of the service, that Company A, 
Third Rhode Island Artillery, now at Jacksonville, be relieved by 
Battery F, Third New York Artillery, from Beaufort, and that 
Company A, on being relieved, be ordered to Beaufort. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

C. R. BRAYTON, 
Colonel, Third Rhode Island Artillery, Chief of Artillery. 

[Indorsement.] 

September b, 1864. 
Recommendations of Colonel Brayton are approved. 
General Hatch to be written to about the company for Fort 
Marion. The order for the relief of the battery (light) will be given 
at once. 

J. a. FOSTER, 
Major- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 5, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. R. Saxton, 

Comdg. North. Dist., Dept. of the South, Morris Island, S. C: 
General : Several of the medical officers lately released by the 
Confederate authorities state that our fire on the city of Charleston 
should be altered so that the shells will drop from 400 to 500 yards 
further to the east. They also state that the shells explode too short, 
and suggest the propriety of lengthening the fuse. 

The major-general commanding directs that this information be 
given to your battery commanders, with instructions that they gov- 
ern their fire accordingly until further orders. By complying with 
these directions, the quarters of our prisoners of war now confined in 
Charleston will not be exposed, and the shells will drop in the most 
populous portion of the city. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, 8. C, September 6, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff, Washington, D. C. : 
General : I have the holior to report that no military operations 
of importance have taken place since the date of my last report. 
The enemy have sent over the lines without exchange a large num- 



Chap. XLVn.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 273 

ber of surgeons and chaplains whom they had held in custody. 
This is the result of the correspondence which I had with General 
Samuel Jones, showing him that these persons were to be considered 
non-combatants. General Jones has also sent over the lines, with- 
out exchange, 2 enlisted men, a sergeant and a private, who were 
captured at Port Royal Ferry under the following circumstances : 

The rebel pickets at that point called to our pickets to send over a 
boat for them, as they wanted to desert. The sergeant in command 
of our pickets, crediilously believing them, went in a boat with 1 
man, and upon their arrival on the opposite shore were taken pris- 
oners and the boat seized. 

General Jones returns them without exchange, with the remark 
that " they were captured under circumstances which he cannot ap- 
prove. " General Jones refuses to allow our officers, prisoners of 
war, to take charge of supplies for our prisoners at Charleston and 
Savannah, but says he will insure their faithful delivery. He has 
no jurisdiction over the prisoners at Anderson ville, and therefore 
declines to entertain that part of the proposition. I inclose a copy 
of the letter. * 

The health of the department is growing rapidly worse. The 
number of sick in hospital is increasing, and a large number of the 
officers have to be furnished with sick leave to prevent permanent 
disability. I have no idea, however, that it is more than the usual 
malarious epidemic and disease peculiar to the climate this season of 
the year. It will not enfeeble the strength of the command beyond 
a proper limit of strength. I can get along very well with the 
force I now have until the enemy's strength is very much increased. 

I have been forced to almost entirely stop the fire upon Fort Sum- 
ter for want of ammunition, the requisitions upon the ordnance de- 
partment having been entirely unfilled, and, on the contrary, large 
orders having been received to send ammunition from this depart- 
ment to Fort. Monroe. We had reached a point in the demolition 
of the fort beyond which the enemy could not have held out many 
weeks in their occupancy. Since the gradual cessation of fire they 
have exerted every effort to pile earth upon the parts which were 
being laid bare by the force of our fire. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



General Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department of the Socth, 

No. 130. 5 Hilton Head, S. C, September 6, 1864. 

It having been officially reported to these headquarters that quite 
a number of small boats and dugouts are now in the hands of, and 
used by, both white persons and negroes in this department, there- 
fore, in order to carry out more fully the provisions of General Or- 
ders, 132, current series, from these headquarters, and to prevent 
the possibility of said boats and dugouts from being used for the 

Surpose of carrying deserters or smuggling goods to the enemy, it is 
ereby ordered : 

I. That all small boats, of whatever description, now in the hands 
of any person in this department ; not used for military purposes by 

' *See p. 357. 

18 R R — VOL XXXV, PT II 



274 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XhYJI. 

the provost-marslial of any post or district, shall be immediately 
taken charge of and guarded in a secure place by the provost-mar- 
shal of the district or post in which the boats are found. ^ 

II. All sailing boats, such as are now used between Hilton Head 
and Beaufort, shall be registered at the office of the provost-marshal 
of each district or post where said sail-boats ply. These boats must 
also have the regular permit to trade between those points. Said 
permit must contain the names of the crew and the purpose for 
which such boat is used. All boats of this description that have not 
been properly registered, in accordance with the provisions of this 
section of the order, within ten days after the date of the same, shall 
be immediately seized and confiscated to the U. S. Government. 

III. The practice of allowing negro women to wander about from 
one plantation to another and from one post or district to another, 
on Government transports, for no other purpose than to while away 
their time or visit their husbands serving in the ranks of the army, 
is not only objectionable in every point of view, both to the soldiers 
and to themselves, but is generally siibversive of moial restraint, 
and must be discontinued at once. All negro women in future 
found wandering in this manner will be immediately arrested and 
compelled to work at some steady employment on the plantations. 

By command of Mai. Gen. J. G. Foster : 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 6, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, 

Comdg. Confederate Forces, Dept. of S. C, Ga., and Ma. : 

General : I have carefully examined the list of 39 prisoners 
who were released by you as non-combatants on the 3d instant, and 
can officially assure you thai they occupy the position recognized by 
you on their discharge, with the following exceptions. I refer to 
these exceptions by the numbers given on the rolls exchanged be- 
tween the officers who respectively represent us : 

No. 2. Bates, H. B. , First Massachusetts Cavalry. 

No. 8. Grossman, J. J. H., McLaughlin's Squadron Ohio Cavalry. 

No. 21. Russell, G. H., Fifth Indiana Cavalry. 

No. 23. Sackett, L. M., Ninety-third Indiana Infantry. 

No. 32. Whitney, B., One hundred and fourth Ohio Infantry. 

No. 39. Higgins, J. D., One hundred and twenty-third Ohio In- 
fantry. 

Of these, Messrs. Bates, Grossman, Russell, and Sackett were act- 
ing assistant surgeons when captured, although they are mustered 
as hospital stewards in their respective commands. Hospital stent- 
ards are, however, recognized as non-combatants, and as these men 
were, besides, doing actual duty as surgeons, I have decided that 
their claim to be released is clear, although needing this explanation. 

Rev. Mr. B. Whitney was, for several months before his capture, 
acting as chaplain of his regiment, in which he was, however, an 
enlisted man. He holds an appointment as chaplain, but has never 
been mustered as such. I, retain him at this pomt until I can ascer- 
tain from you whether you still regard him as a non-combatant and 
entitled to release. If you do not, and require an equivalent for 
him, I will send you a private in his stead. 



Chap. XLVH.] COERESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 2^5 

Mr. J. D. Higgins, of the One hundred and twenty-third Ohio 
Infantry, is not an assistant surgeon, but a lieutenant. He states 
that his being regarded as a medical officer is not the result of any 
active deception on his part, but arose from an accidental error com- 
mitted by one of your officers in making out the prisoners' roll, of 
which error the lieutenant, in his desire to escape, silently took ad- 
vantage. I have also detained him at this place. I will, according 
to our previous agreement, in case you so elect, return him, upon 
the understanding that he shall not be submitted to punishment for 
his apparent deception, which seems, as I have explained, to have 
been unpremeditated. I prefer, however, to give you his equivalent 
in privates under the cartel. 

Awaiting your decision upon these two cases, I am, very respect- 
fully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the Sout^, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 6, 1864. 

Capt. C. R. SuTER, 

Chief Engineer, Department of the South: 

Captain : You will conduct a reconnaissance into Dewees Inlet 
and to the mainland at or near Fuller's Station. Reaching this 
point you will throw out scouts, as far as safety will admit, toward 
Hobcaw Point, on the Cooper River, and endeavor to aid any Union 
officers that may have tried to escape in that direction. Continuing 
the reconnaissance at this place as long as is safe, you will then 
reconnoiter in succession all the inland bays as far as Bull's Bay, 
keeping a sharp lookout on the mainland for refugees and escaped 
prisoners. The reconnaissance should continue until Saturday 
morning. One company, at least, of good marksmen will be taken 
on each boat, the Plato and the Island City, and each boat will tow 
a naval launch with howitzer. Show these orders to General Sax- 
ton and to the senior naval officer on the station. 
Very respectfully, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. op the South, 

Morris Island, September 8, 1864. 

General J. G. Foster : 

General : I have the honor to report that on yesterday the rebel 
prisoners were all safely landed and placed in the stockade m front 
of Fort Strong. I found on my arrival here that General Schim- 
melfennig had already detailed the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Regi- 
ment, Colonel Hallowell, to guard the prisoners, and as I was ex- 
pected as far as possible to carry out his plans I have not changed 
the detail. I believe that no better officer than Colonel Hallowell 
can be found in whose hands to place their safe-keepmg, and thus 
far the duty has been well performed. Last night was so dark and 



276 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVII. 

the weather so stormy that the navy boats did not report for duty 
at Paine's Dock. My boat brigade was out, but saw nothing unusual. 
The navy detail have reported this morning, and no exertions will 
be spared to carry out successfully the objects of the expedition. 
I am, very respectfully, 

R. SAXTON, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



Morris Island, September 8, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Commanding Department of the South : 

General : In accordance with your directions, I have since my 
arrival here been endeavoring to make myself master of my posi- 
tion. I find there is a great deal of work to be done to place the works 
here and this command in the condition they should be, even for 
- tolerable defense. When this is accomplished there is, with a little 
extra work, an excellent opportunity for offensive operations even 
with a small force. 1 have passed considerable time each day since 
my arrival in experimenting with the fire on Charleston, and not- 
withstanding the poor materials at hand for working the one gun 
(a 100-pounder Parrott), which is the only one available for operating 
on the city, I am convinced that Charleston can be destroyed. With 
a sufficient number of Parrott guns, 30, 100, and "200 pounders, well 
sighted, with good iron carriages capable of giving an elevation of 40 
degrees, with time-fuses of fifty-three seconds, or good percussion- 
shells, with plenty of grease for the projectiles and a careful super- 
intendence of the firing, and Charleston is at your mercy. I would 
recommend the- putting of twenty, or better thirty, 100-pounder Par- 
rott guns in position on our most advanced works, providing 600 or 
700 rounds of ammunition for each gun, and when the naval battery 
is ready to operate, let, our forces open on Charleston and fire until 
ordered to cease. If then the navy could be induced to sail in, I am 
confident the city would be completely destroyed or surrendered to 
our arms. 

I have no faith in the impregnability of Charleston, and I trust 
that our Government will determine ere the fall campaign is over 
the headquarters of the Department of the South shall be in Charles- 
ton, or where it was. 

I am, general, very truly, yours, 

R. SAXTON, 
« Brigadier-General. 

P. S. — The enemy fired 2 shots at Fort Putnam from Charleston; 
yesterday. They fell short. 

R. S. 

[Indorsement.] 

Write letter approving the idea. Instructions just received direct 
us to remain strictly on the defeiisive, hence the fire on Sumter arid 
the city cannot be increased at this time. The batteries can be en- 
larged and more guns mounted, ready for future work. 

J. G. F. 



Chap. XLVn.) COEEESPONDENCE, ETC. UNIOIT. 277 

Engineer Department, 
Washington, September 9, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Hilton Head, S. C. : 
General: Understanding from the chief of staif that you will 
have no present use for the two bridge trains recently ordered by 
you for Hilton Head, Mr. Trowbridge has been directed to retain 
them in New York, subject to the wants of the general service. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

RICHARD DELAFIELD, 
Brigadier-Oeneral and Chief of Engineers. 



[Indorsement.] 

Acknowledge receipt. 



J. G. F. 



Engineer Department, 

Washington, September 9, 1864.. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Hdqrs. Dept. of the South, Hilton Head, S. C. : 
General : There is at New York a bridge of ten corrugated 
iron pontoons, just completed and ordered by General Woodbury 
for use in a Southern climate. In consequence of the death of Gen- 
eral Woodbury and the resulting derangement of his special plans 
in connection with this bridge, there seems now no necessity for its 
being sent to Key West. I desire to learn whether you can receive 
these pontoons and have them tested, as to the comparative advan- 
tages of wooden and metallic boats, in Ihe climate in which you are 
operating. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

RICHARD DELAFIELD, 
Brigadier-General and Chief of Engineers. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Morris Island, S. C, September 9, 1864. 
Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Assistant Adjutant-General. Dept. of the South: 
Captain : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your let- 
ter of September 5 with regard to the fire "of our gun on Charleston. 
In reply I have to report that I fully appreciate the importance of 
the suggestions therein contained and hope that you will call the 
attention of the major-general commanding to the fact that we have 
no fuses longer than forty seconds, while we require forty-three 
seconds, and when we splice them they do not answer. Thus far I 
have not found the perciission-shells reliable. There is needed here 
immediately a large number of 43-second fuses and grease for the 
projectiles, as I am informed there is none at the post, and it is very 
bad to fire without lubricating the shell or shot. There is a great 
deal needed here to make the ordnance department efficient, and as 
it is our main dependence for present operations, I beg that you will 
call the commanding general's. early attention to the subject. 
I am, captain, very respectfully, 

R. SAXTON, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



278 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVH. 

Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Morris Island, S. C, September 9, 1864. 
Col. William Gurnet, 

127th N. Y. Vols., Comdg. Post, Morris Island, S. C. : 
Colonel : I have the honor to inform you that the brigadier-gen- 
eral commanding has given his consent that blankets be issued to 
the destitute rebel officers, prisoners of war. You are authorized to 
make demand upon the post quartermaster for them, the blankets 
to be turned over to the quartermaster by the provost-marshal 
"when the prisoners are removed from the island. 

I am, colonel, with great respect, your obedient servant, 

STUART M. TAYLOR, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



U. S. Bark Houghton, 

September 10, 1864. 
Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron : 
Sir : I have the honor to report that the firing from this ship last 
night was occasioned by trying to bring a sloop to, in the act of 
violating the quarantine regulations of this port. He paid no atten- 
tion to us until r fired the second shot ; he then lowered his sail. I 
then dispatched the Larkspur (sent here to condense water for the 
ship) to bring her under our guns, but in the darkness she escaped. 
The Larkspur searched for her nearly an hour. She is not in sight 
this morning. I also report that Acting Master E. G. Furber is still 
sick and unable to attend to duty. 
Very respectfully, 

GEORGE R. BAILEY, 
Acting Ensign, U. S. N., Executive Officer. 

[Indorsement.] 

September 10, 1864. 
Forwarded for the perusal qf General Foster, the vessel referred 
to not being known to be within naval Jurisdiction. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear-Admiral. 



Hdqrs. Dept. of S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 

Charleston, S. C, September 10, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, U. S. Volunteers, 

Commanding Department of the South, Hilton Head: 
General : In reply to your letter of the 5th instant in regard to 
James Pike and Charles R. Gray, I have to say that they were 
arrested in Edgefield District of this State. They were not in U. S. 
uniform when captured, and had about their persons certain papers 
which warranted the belief that they were spies. They are confined, 
as is usual in such cases, and will be accorded a fair trial. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

SAM. JONES, 
Major -General, Commanding. 



Chap. XLVII.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 279 



Hdqrs. Dept. op S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 

Charleston, S. C, September 10, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, U. S. Volunteers, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Hilton Head, S. C. : 
General : I concur with you in the opinion that Hospital Stewards 
Bates, Grossman, Russell, and Sackett, of the U. S. service, men- 
tioned in your letter of the 6th instant, who when captured were 
acting assistant surgeons, are entitled to their discharge from con- 
finement as prisoners of war. I do not think B. Whitney, of the 
One hundred and fourth Ohio Infantry, can be regarded as a non- 
combatant. His military status should be determined by the 
muster-rolls. He was discharged under the belief that he was a 
chaplain, but you tell me he was not mustered as such, but was 
acting as chaplain of the regiment in which he was an enlisted 
man. I will, however, accept a private in exchange for him. If 
you will accept an officer who could be guilty of such conduct as 
that by which Lieut. J. D. Higgins, of the One hundred and twenty- 
third Ohio Infantry, procured his release, and will give in exchange 
for him the number of privates stipulated in the cartel as the 
equivalent of a lieutenant, I will very willingly make that exchange. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

SAM. JONES, 
Major- General, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. Dept. of S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 

Charleston, S. C, September 10, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, U. S. Volunteers, 

Commanding Department of the South : 
General : I have reason to believe that a number of C. S. officers, 
prisoners of war, are at present confined in a stockade on Morris 
Island, between and very near Batteries Gregg and Wagner. I 
have respectfully to ask if such is the case, and, if so, what shelter 
is provided for them, and if they receive in all respects, save loca- 
tion, the treatment accorded to prisoners of war among civilized 
nations ? 

I make this inquiry because I believe you are retaliating on those 
officers for a supposed disregard of the usages of civilized warfare 
in the treatment extended to U. S. officers, prisoners of war, now in 
this city. Those officers are comfortably housed and receive the 
treatment due prisoners of war, and I will repeat what I have before 
had occasion to say to you, that I shall greatly deplore any necessity 
you may force on me to direct any change in their treatment. If by 
the 15th instant I receive no reply, I shall be justified in the conclu- 
sion that my supposition is correct and act accordingly. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

SAM. JONES, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Office op Agent op Exchange, Dept. of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 10, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. John G. Foster, 

Commanding Department : 
General : I have the honor to report that on the 3d instant I 
met Maj. John F. Lay, Confederate agent of exchange, under a 



280 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVII. 

flag of truce, at Charleston Harbor. He delivered to me 39 sur- 
geons, assistant surgeons, chaplains, and hospital stewards, whom 
General Jones released as non-combatants ; also 2 soldiers recently- 
captured at Port Eoyal Ferry, S. C, whom General Jones released 
without equivalent, stating through Major Lay that they were cap- 
tured by a deception which he disavowed. "These released officers 
proved on examination to be of the rank accepted by General Jones, 
except in seven instances. Five of these were mustered as hospital 
stewards, but were acting when captured as assistant surgeons. 
Since, however, hospital stewards are non-combatants and as such 
entitled to their discharge, the error is unimportant. The sixth, 
Rev. Mr. B. Whitney, One hundred and fourth Ohio Volunteers, 
was released as a chaplain, but was in fact a private, who had been 
acting as chaplain for several months previous to his capture. The 
seventh, Lieut. J. D. Higgins, One hundred and twenty-third Ohio 
Volunteers, is a line officer, but by an error of the Confederate 
prison officer in making out his rolls was put down as an assistant 
surgeon. Of this error he silently took advantage. 

When the exchanges were effected at Port Royal Ferry on August 
16, to close up the balance of the exchange at Charleston Harbor 
of August 3, we supposed that we had delivered all the Confederate 
prisoners then in our hands, except a few who had been captured by 
our colored troops in Florida and who were held for exchange for 
colored prisoners. Major Lay, however, then stated that some of 
the prisoners held by us as having been captured by colored troops 
were in fact captured by the Seventy-fifth Ohio Mounted Infantry 
(white). He asked whether, should his statement on examination 
prove correct, we would exchange them. Supposing that you had 
authority under General Halleck's letter of July 19 to do so, and 
believing that an assent to Major Lay's request would, as it did, 
assist the negotiations in regard to surgeons, chaplains, &c., then 
progressing between us, I agreed to it. I omitted to refer to this in 
my written report to you of August 17. An examination subse- 
quently ordered by you and made by Lieutenant- Colonel Hall, pro- 
vost-marshal-general of this department, showed that Major Lay's 
statement was correct in the case of Lieutenant Packard, Second 
Florida Cavalry ; Quartermaster Sergeant Carroll, Villepigue's bat- 
tery, and 4 privates. At our interview of September 3, I in- 
formed Major Lay of the result of the investigation, and he imme- 
diately tendered me Lieutenant Lay, One hundred and seventeenth 
New York Volunteers ; Mr. Parkman, captain's clerk, U. S. Navy, 
and Sergeant Burkhardt, Fourth Michigan Cavalry, offering to re- 
ceive the Confederate officer and men above referred to on Septem- 
ber 8, at Port Royal Ferry. He stated that Mr. Parkman was 
offered in fulfillment of a former promise of his to Major Anderson, 
of your staff. I did not feel at liberty to decline to carry out my; 
promise made, as above stated, on August 16, and accord.ingly ac- 
cepted the proffered officers and sergeant, agreeing to deliver to 
him Lieutenant Packard and the other Confederate prisoners on 
September 8. 

On my return to Hilton Head Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, at Mr. 
Parkman's request, sent 4 Confederate privates to the provost- 
marshal-general of the department to be delivered to the Confeder- 
ate authorities in exchange for Mr. Parkman, thus relieving you 
from furnishing equivalents for a naval officer. 



Cbap. XLVn.] CORRESPONDENCE. ETC. — UNION. 281 

On September 8, 1 took Lieutenant Packard, Sergeant Carroll, and 
the 4 privates so furnislied by Admiral Dahlgren to Port Royal 
Ferry and delivered tbem to Capt. A. L. Campbell, Third South 
Carolina Cavalry, who represented General Jones on the occasion. 

The matter of exchange in this department is now closed, with the 
exception of Rev. Mr. Whitney, One hundred and fourth Ohio Vol- 
iinteers, and Lieut. J. D. Higgins, One hundred and twenty-third 
Ohio Volunteers, of whose cases I have already made a full explana- 
tion. If I'have in this last matter of exchanging Lieutenant Pack- 
ard, &c., violated your orders or those of the department, it has 
been done unintentionally. Whatever of blame there is herein is 
mine, and should in no respect affect yourself. I could neither 
break my word as given on August 16, nor permit Lieutenant Lay, 
Mr. Parkman, and Sergeant Burkhardt to return to their bondage 
after they had been brought down by Major Lay on the assurance 
that they should be exchanged if your investigation of Lieutenant 
Packard's case proved the major's statement as to their capture 
correct. 

Major Lay, at the close of our interview on September 3, instant, 
stated that the Confederate authorities were still ready to exchange, 
rank for rank and man for man, all the prisoners whom they held 
in General Jones' department. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

STEWART L. WOODFORD, 
Lieut. Col. 127th New York Vols., Agent for Exchange. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 11, 1864. 
Rear-Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, 

Comdg. S. Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Port Royal, S. C. : 

Admiral : In my letter of the 2d instant, in answer to your 
favor of the 1st instant, concerning the batteries on Morris Island 
firing into the flag-of-truce boat sent to communicate with the 
navy, I informed you that I had referred your letter to Brigadier- 
General Saxton, commanding Northern District, for investigation 
and a report. I have just received the report, and find that the 
officer in command of the battery was acting under orders which 
I gave some time since to the officers commanding the different dis- 
tricts of the department, viz, to allow no communication with the 
enemy at any other point than Port Royal Ferry. I informed 
Major-General Jones of this order, and there has been no attempt 
on his part to communicate with the army forces at other points. 

It seems from Captain Green's report that the enemy's flag-of- 
truce boat came from an unusual place, which undoubtedly caused 
the officers of the batteries to be suspicious of it, as they did not 
know that it was the intention of the senior naval officer to commu- 
nicate by flag of truce. I would respectfully suggest that in future, 
when you desire to send a flag-of-truce boat to the enemy at such 
points as are covered by our batteries, that j^ou will notify the com- 
manding officer of the district of your intention in time for him to 
give the necessary orders. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-Qeneral, Commanding. 



282 S. C, FLA., AND OK THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

HiUQn Head, S. C, September 11, 1864. 
MaJ. Gen. Samuel Jones, 

Comdg. Confederate Forces in S. C, Ga., and Fla. : 
General : I would respectfully call your attention to the follow- 
ing-named medical officers and non-combatants who ^are confined 
within your department, and request that they be releas'ed in accord- 
ance with the cartel and by the precedents established between 
ourselves : 

Dr. Nickerson, assistant surgeon. Sixteenth Connecticut Volun- 
teers; captured at Plymouth, N. C, April 30, 1864. 

Dr. Denny, Second Massachusetts Artillery, assistant surgeon. 
John I. Wilkins, assistant surgeon. Fourteenth Illinois Cavalry. 
John A. Mendenhall, hospital steward. Second Indiana Cavalry. 
Joseph Albert Doane, sutler, Sixteenth Connecticut Volunteers. 
Edward C. Johnson, assistant sutler. Sixteenth Connecticut Vol- 
unteers. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-Oeneral, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 11, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. R. Saxton, 

Comdg. North. Dist. , Dept. South, Morris Island, S. C. : 
General : I am directed by the major-general commanding to 
acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 8th instant, making 
suggestions for offensive operations against Charleston, &c. The 
major-general commanding directs me to state that your suggestions 
are approved by him, but as instructions have just been received 
here from the War Department directing him to remain strictly on 
the defensive, the fire on Charleston and Sumter cannot be increased 
at this time. The batteries, however, may be enlarged and more 
guns mounted, ready for future work. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters District of West Florida, 

Barrancas, September 11, 1864. 
Maj. C. T. Christensen, 

A. A. O., Hdqrs. Mil. Division of West Mississippi: 
Major : I have the honor to submit, in connection with my report 
of August 24, No. 892, the following additional information re- 
ceived from refugees and deserters relative to the movements of the 
enemy : 

There are about 12,000 troops at Mobile, and about 10,000 contra- 
bands working on the fortifications. General Prank Gardner is in 
command of the troops and General Higgins in charge of the forti- 
fications. Colonel Maury, Fifteenth Confederate Cavalry, is concen- 
trating a force between the Perdido and Mobile Bay. The camps 



Chap. XLVH.] COEEESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 283 

are at Greenwood's and H. Sibley's, and number 2,000 to 3,000 in- 
fantry, 700 cavalry, and four pieces of artillery. They are expect- 
ing re-enforcements from Blue Mountain, Ala. The railroad from 
Mobile to Pollard is well guarded by an additional force of 5,000, 
with headquarters at Pollard, and a small force at Pine Barren 
Bridge with an advanced post at Gonzales. Between the Yellow 
and Red Rivers there is one company of cavalry. Dr. Brady com- 
manding, and one company of infantry, collecting deserters and 
driving negroes northward. At Montgomery there was, on 1st in- 
stant, but one company of infantry. The city is intrenched all 
around from river to river and several hundred negroes were work- 
ing on the fortifications. There are sixteen heavy guns on the arsenal 
and twelve field pieces, 6 and 12 pounders, in an open block on 
Washington street. The height and thickness of ramparts is 5 to 6 
feet, the depth of the ditch 4 feet, and 6 feet wide. The magazines 
are near the Alabama River, made of brick, guarded, and believed 
to be full of ammunition, but not bomb-proof. There is a large 
amount of quartermaster and commissary stores collected and de- 
posited in store-houses in the middle of the city. Major Calhoun is 
in command of the works and Major Wagner in command of the 
arsenal. The Alabama River is navigable at present for small boats 
only of 5 or 6 feet draught, while in the winter it will admit boats 
of 12 to 15 feet draught. There are no armed boats of any kind 
near the city. The Montgomery, Opelika and West Point Railroad 
was repaired but again partially destroyed by Sherman's force. 

When my informant left on the 1st instant. Hood's army num- 
bered not more than 30,000, the larger portion of which had already 
retreated to Macon, leaving only two brigades as rear guard at At- 
lanta, which place was shortly after his departure entered by Sher- 
man's army. It is the general impression among the people that 
the South will shortly succumb and the militia forced lately to take 
arms will not fight. The veteran troops are also much demoralize<i. 

On the northern portion of my district there are in and around 
Marianna the following troops, in charge of Colonel Montgomery, 
commanding district : 300 infantry (militia) and 100 cavalry. Captain 
Poe in the city; one small company of cavalry at Chipola Spring, 
Captain Chissen ; one company below Hickory Hill, Captain Gida ; 
one at Vernon, Captain Jones, and one at Sweetwater, on the Saint 
Andrew's road, Capt. William H. Milton. Their strength averages 
80 men. • 

At Marianna there are several hundred prisoners confined. They 
have commenced to fortify Marianna and expect artillery. The ne- 
groes of the neighborhood are placed at work on the fortifications. 
Very respectfully, major, your obedient servant, 

ASBOTH, 
Brigadier- General. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 13, 1864. 

Rear-Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron .; 
Admiral : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a com- 
munication from George R. Bailey, acting ensign and executive 



284 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVU. 

officer of the U. S. bark Houghton, which was forwarded by you 
for my information. A previous report had reached these head- 
quarters and I caused an immediate investigation in the matter. 

A copy of the letter,* with the indorsements thereon, is respect- 
fully furnished for your information. There does not appear to be 
any knowledge whatever of this sloop on this side of the harbor. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTEE, 
Major- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 12, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, 

Commanding. Confederate Forces : 
General : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
communication of the 3d instant, complaining that the batteries on 
Morris Island on August 30 fired upon your nag-of -truce boat while 
passing through Beach Channel. In reply I beg to state that this 
liring was caused by a misapprehension on the part of the officer 
commanding our advance batteries at Cumming's Point. Having 
received my orders to allow no communication by flags of truce at 
other points than Port Royal Ferry, except upon my special direc- 
tion, and not having been informed of the intended communication 
with you by senior naval officer, the commandant of the fort thought 
it his duty to attempt to cause your boat to turn back by firing over 
it. I have desired the admiral commanding our naval forces to 
notify the commanding officer at Morris Island of any future at- 
tempt to communicate with you under a flag in time to prevent any 
repetition of this occurrence. 

Regretting that it should have happened, I am, very respectfully, 
your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 12, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. R. Saxton, 

Comdg. Northern District, Department of the South: 
General : I send you a recapitulation of the verbal orders you 
received when I was at Morris Island, with a few additions. You 
will cause a shot to be fired into the city of Charleston every fifteen 
minutes, each one carefully pointed so as not to endanger our pris- 
oners, say at the middle steeple, and elevated and charged so as to 
range to the upper part of the city. An occasional shot will be fireet 
at Sumter from our batteries on Cumming's Point. The Swamp 
Angel will be fired at night in order to prevent the discharge of 
supply vessels or steamers at Sumter. The other batteries will regu- 
late their fire by the enemy, generally answering all their shots, 
gun for gun. Carpenters will be sent at once, with all the engineers 
that oan be spared, to complete the palisading and stockade about 
the front batteries. I find by careful inquiry that the steamer 
Philadelphia cannot be used to advantage through the inland 

»See p. 278. 



Chap. ILVn.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 285 

passages and shoal water of your district, and have therefore 
ordered the Houghton and General Hooker to be assigned for the 
present to your department. These boats are small, but owing to 
their light draught of water will be of more service to you than the 
Philadelphia, as they can go either outside or inside. The colum- 
biads should be removed from Cole's Island to Fort Delafield, and 
the 30-pounder Parrotts from Long Island to Morris or Folly Island. 
Light guns should be substituted for the columbiads on Cole's 
Island and for those taken from Long Island. Your particular 
attention will be given to the care of the prisoners of war on 
Morris Island, and the utmost vigilance exercised on the part of the 
guards. 

I desire that detailed orders may be given to every regiment and 
detachment in your command as to their rallying points and their 
duties, in case of an attack by a party of the enemy in boats with 
the design of liberating the rebel prisoners. These detailed orders 
should be concise and clear, and be thoroughly understood by every 
officer and man. Very little dependence must be placed upon the 
firing from Fort Strong on parties of men whileon the island ; all 
such must be attended to by infantry and light artillery. The 
rations of our officers, prisoners of war in Charleston, have been 
ascertained to be as follows : Fresh meat, three-quarters of a pound, 
or one-half pound of salt meat ; rice, one-fifth pint ; one-half pound 
liard-bread or one-half pint of meal ; beans, one-fifth pint. I de- 
sire that in rationing the prisoners of war now in your hands you 
be governed accordingly, making sure that they receive no more 
than the above except what salt or vinegar may be necessary for 
them. You may, whenever it is deemed advisable, issue molasses 
to them in lieu of any of the articles mentioned. Our officers con- 
fined in Charleston are obliged to cook their own food, and I desire 
that the prisoners in our hands be made to do the same, unless you 
consider it more convenient or safe to do their cooking by soldiers 
detailed for the purpose. If you conclude to have the prisoners do 
their own cooking, details must be made from each detachment for 
the purpose, and the cooking must be done within the limits of the 
prison camp, and care must be taken to see that the cooking places 
are thoroughly cleansed after each meal. The printed orders 
issued by Colonel Guruey for the government of the camp must be 
modified accordingly. 

I have the honor to be, general, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters District of West Florida, 

Barrancas, September 12, 1864. 
Maj. George B. Drake, 

Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Department of the Gulf: 
Major : I have the honor to report that owing to information re- 
ceived and forwarded yesterday, under No. 1045, I am to start on a 
cavalry raid into the northeastern portion of West Florida. Going 
up the Santa Rosa Island and swimming the horses across the East 
Pass to the mainland, I will proceed to Point Washington and from 
thence to Marianna and vicinity,- returning via Saint Andrew's Salt- 
Works. My object is to capture the isolated rebel cavalry and 
infantry in Washington and Jackson Counties, and to liberate the 



286 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVU. 

Union prisoners confined at Marianna, to collect white and colored 
recruits, and secure as many horses and mules as possible. All the 
infantry will remain here for the safety of Barrancas and surround- 
ings. 

Very respectfully, major, your obedient servant, 

ASBOTH, 
Brigadier-General. 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 13, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, 

Oontdg. Confederate Forces, Dept. of S. C, Ga., and Fla. : 
General : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
letter of the 10th instant, in reply to mine of the 5th, in regard to 
James Pike and Charles R. Gray, now confined in the jail tower at 
Charleston. You state therein that they were arrested in Edgefield 
District, S. C. ; that they were not in U. S. uniform when captured, 
and had about them certain papers which, in your judgment, war- 
ranted the belief that they were spies. These statements are at vari- 
ance with information in my hands. I desire to acknowledge your 
assurance that they shall have a fair trial, and have the honor to 
request that when they are tried you will furnish me with a copy of 
the proceedings, and also of their sentence in case they are convicted. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 13, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones,. 

Comdg. Confederate Forces, Dept. of S. C, Ga., and Fla. : 
GENER.4.L : I would respectfully invite your attention to the incon- 
venience of exchanging nags of truce at either Port Royal Ferrjr or 
at Charleston Harbor. The position of the ferry makes it unsuita- 
ble for the delivery or the reception of persons or of packages de- 
signed for the prisoners on either side, while in rough weather boats 
cannot safely meet in Charleston Harbor. I would suggest the 
Savannah River, off Jones' Island, as a suitable place for all future 
exchange of flags of truce between us. It is alike easy of access to 
both of us, and is slieltered from all but the most violent storms. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. . 



Hdqrs. Dept. of S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 

Charleston, S. C, September 13, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, U. S. Volunteers, 

Commanding Department of the South, Hilton Head: 

General : The officer to whom I referred your letter of the 2ist 
ultimo, concerning sanitar-y and clothing stores for prisoners of war, 
has replied that the prisoners will be allowed to receive them. It 
will be more convenient for me to receive them in this harbor than 



Chap. XLVII.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 287 

ill the Savannah River, and thej^ will be received at the point in the 
outer harbor agreed upon by Major Lay, of my staff, and Lieutenant- 
Colonel Woodford, of yours, for the meeting of flag-of -truce boats, 
on any day you may designate. If this arrangement suits you, my 
boat will take position at the designated hour, when the stores will 
be received. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

SAM. JONES, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters District op Florida, 

Jacksonville, Fla., September 13, 1864. 
Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Assistant Adjutant- General, Department of the South: 
Captain : On the 11th ii\stant a flag of truce came to our advanced 
pickets under a Maj. H. Goldthwaite, assistant inspector-general. 
It covered a number of women and children whose husbands and 
fathers were within our lines. All who desired to remain perma- 
nently within our lines and who were willing to take the oath of 
allegiance to the Government were allowed to enter. Two "women 
who desired to return were informed 'that under such circumstances 
persons were not allowed to enter the lines. They returned. Refu- 
gees coming in inform me that the rebels are engaged in rebuilding 
the railroad, having quite a strong force engaged on the work. 
Negroes are being sent out of the State in large numbers. 

I neglected to say that Surg. John Ingram, of the Seventy-fifth 
Ohio Volunteers, taken prisoner at Gainesville, returned by the 
flag. He states that he was well treated by the rebel authorities. 
I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant. 

JNO. P. hatch; 
Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 15, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. H. W. Hallbck, U. S. Army, 

Chief of StafF, Armies of the United States : 
General : I have the honor to transmit herewith a true copy of 
the statement of Charles Harris, a deserter from the C. S. Navy at 
Charleston, and who belonged to the gun -boat Chicora, T. T. Hunter 
commanding, now stationed in Cooper River. I respectfully re- 
quest that the matter may be brought to the notice of the Navy 
Department at Washington. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 

[Inclosure.] 

Examination of Charles Harris. 

Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. op the South, 

Morris Island, S. C, September 7, 1864. 
I belonged to the gun-boat Chicora. There are about 60 men and 
officers on board ; T. T. Hunter is commander. There are four guns, 
two 9-inch Dahlgren and two 7-inch Brooke rifles. The men are armed 



288 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVII. 

with rifles, pistols, revolvers, swords, &c. There are four row-boats 
on board the Chicora. We lay up in the Cooper River not quite as 
high as the receiving ship. 

The Palmetto State, Charleston, and the Columbia are in the 
Charleston Harbor ; they are all iron-olads. The Palmetto State has 
four guns, two 9-inch Dahlgren and two 7-inch Brooke rifles. The 
Charleston has six guns. I do not know their caliber ; the two pivot 
guns are 7-inch. The Columbia is pierced for eight guns ; she is not 
yet ready for sea. She is built so long that her bow and stern settle in 
the water and leave her middle high up. I do not think they will ever 
use her. These boats all lay up the Cooper River nearly opposite 
the Northeastern Railroad depot. One of these boats goes on picket 
every night between the city and Fort Johnson. The Charleston is 
the flag-ship. She is the fastest ; she can steam about 4 miles an 
hour. The Palmetto State's boilers are out of order. She goes very 
slowly. The Chicora will sail about 3 miles an hour. On board the 
receiving-ship there are about 150 North Carolina conscripts. The 
blockade-runners are the Stag (she went in night before last). Fox, 
Druid, Syren. I heard that the General Whiting was sunk. There 
are, I think, about eight torpedo-boats, 8 feet in diameter and 50 feet 
long ; they come to a point at either end and propelled by steam. 
These boats all have torpedoes, some 15 or 16 feet in front of the 
bow. The iron-clads all have torpedoes, with between 60 and 150 
pounds of powder in each, placed in front of their bows. They 
carry four or five to each boat and keep them in their magazines, 
which is forward near the bow. The plating is of 2-inch plates all over 
except the deck, which is one-half inch. I heard on board my boat 
that they were going to fit out all the blockade-runners as privateers 
with two or three guns on each, and run the blockade and prey wpon 
our commerce. The captain of the Chicora will have command of 
the Stag. Some nine or ten days ago the Tallahassee ran into Wil- 
mington, N. C. They are fitting up all the blockade-runners there 
also. Captain Brown, of the Charleston, is going with several other 
officers to Wilmington, N. C. , to take command of some of the ves- 
sels ; if they get out, I think they will do something desperate. They 
also talk of making a raid to Point Lookout for the purpose of lib- 
erating their prisoners at that place. 

Our rations are 14 ounces hard bread and 1^ pounds fresh beef, 
sometimes salt beef. This last week we received 6 sacks each coffee 
and sugar. We have passes into the city once in awhile. I was 
there two weeks ago. I landed at Calhoun street wharf. There are 
no guns upon it ; there was one, biit it has been removed. The 
Blakely gun is on Frazer's wharf. On the battery or parade 
ground there are some six or eight guns. The shells from Cum- 
ming's Point are doing a good deal of damage. 

I was born in Ireland ; am twenty -five years of age ; have been in 
this country fourteen years. I resided nine years in New York, f 
was on board a steam-boat on the Mississippi till all the boats 
stopped running, and then I came to Charleston and tried to run the 
blockade on the steamer Macaroni, but could not get out and they 
compelled me to enlist in the Navy about two years ago. I was 
never paid, but got a little money now and then. They think tliat 
if Lincoln is re-elected there will be a revolution in the West ; if Mc- 
Clellan is elected they think he will recognize, the Confederacy and 
there will be peace ; that is their only hope. There is a gun-boat up 
near Columbus, Ga,, which they are trying to fit out. 1 think they 



Chap. XLVII.] CORRESPONDEKCE, ETC. UNION. 289 

are determined to do something desperate if these boats get out. I 
do not know anything of Fort Sumter. I heard that some 600 or 
700 prisoners were confined in Charleston. I jumped off the boat 
last night and s^am to Morris Island. They heard me and sent a 
boat after me, but I eluded them. 



Engineer Department, 
Washington, September 15, 1864, 
Maj. Gen. John G. Foster, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Hilton Head, S. C. : 
General : Your letter of the 3d instant, particularizing the most 
important defects to which you object in the plan, &c., of Fort 
Clinch, has been received and I am greatly obliged therefor. If 
your time will permit you to furnish an oiitline sketch or written 
description of the corrections for these defects, it will be very ac- 
ceptable to the department. Captain Sears (in charge of the fort) 
will furnish any plan of the grounds that you may require. The 
plans in this office indicate no favorable gi'ound for establishing 
batteries that will command the terre-plein of the work or its scarp. 
A new survey will be ordered. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

RICHARD DELAFIELD, 
Brigadier-General and Chief of Engineers. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Morris Island, S. C, September 15, 1864. 
Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron: 
Admiral : I have the honor very respectfully to request that, 
if consistent with the interest of the service, a navy launch, 
manned and armed with a rifled 13-pounder howitzer, may be 
placed on picket service in the creeks opposite Long Island and 
in Stono and Folly Rivers. Such a boat will be of very great 
service there. 

I am, admiral, with great respect, your obedient servant, 

RUFUS SAXTON, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



General Orders, ) Headquarters Northern District, 
|- Department op the South, 

No. 56. ) Morris Island, S. C, September 15, 1864. 

General instructions for the guidance of this command in case 
of an alarm : 

In case of an alarm at this post, a rocket will be sent up from 
Fort Shaw and one gun fired from the same place. At this signal 
the long- roll will be sounded, and th^ entire command will be formed 
under arms at once. 

Two rockets and two guns from Fort Shaw will be the signal 
for the command to assemble at the place of rendezvous, which 
is on the beach, in rear of Fort, Shaw, fronting the water. 

The regiments will move to"'the place of rendezvous at double- 
quick step, and will form in line of battle in the following order : 

19 R R— V.OL XXXV, PT II 



290 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVU. 

First, on the right, the Fifty-sixth New York Volunteers ; second, 
the One hundred and twenty -seventh New York Volunteers ; third, 
the Fifty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers ; fourth, the Twenty-first 
U. S. Colored Troops. 

The One hundred and twenty-seventh New York Volunteers 
will act as a reserve and hold Fort Shaw. 

The Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Volunteers will join that por- 
tion of the regiment guarding the rebel prisoners. 

The light battery will form in rear of the line of battle. 

Each regimental commander will send an otEcer to report his 
command in line to the post commander, who will at once pro- 
ceed to the place of rendezvous with his staff, to superintend the 
formation of the line. 

At the first signal every officer and enlisted man in this com- 
mand, except the sick excused by the surgeon, will turn out under 
arms, and, if mounted, with his horse. 

District staff officers will repair at once to the district headquar- 
ters and report to the brigadier-general commanding. 

Post staff officers will, in like manner, report to the post com- 
mander. All mounted orderlies will report mounted. The quar- 
termaster will see that all his means of transportation by land and 
water are ready to move at a moment's notice, and the medical 
department will have its ambulances and other appliances for the 
sicK in readiness. 

The most prompt and thorough compliance with these instruc- 
tions will be required, and no negligence or failure to respond to 
the above-mentioned signal call will be overlooked. 

R. SAXTON, 
Brigadier-General, Comw,anding. 



Hbadquaktees Depaktment op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 15, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. John P. Hatch, 

Comdg. District of Florida, Jacksonville, Fla. : 
General : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
communication of the 13th instant, stating that certain persons had 
been allowed by you to pass into our lines under a flag of truce. In 
reply, I have to state, by direction of the major-general command- 
ing, that no women will be admitted within our lines who have no 
relatives on this side to take proper care of them. Generally only 
the wives and families of deserters and refugees are admitted ; and 
they cannot return over the lines again, under any circumstances. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Hdqrs. Dept. op S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 

Charleston, S. C, September 16, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Commanding U. S. Forces, Hilton Head, S. C. : 
General : In reply to your communication of the 10th instant, I 
have the honor to say that it will not be convenient to me to receive 
the 5 privates you mention in the Savannah River off Jones' Island. 



Chap. XLVn.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 291 

I would receive them at Port Royal Ferry at the day and hour 
named, but as you have given permits to some ten families to enter 
your lines, and as in your communication of the 11th instant you 
express a desire to send boxes of supplies, &c., to the Federal pris- 
oners of war, I will send a boat to the appointed place of meeting in 
the outer harbor of Charleston on Friday, the iiSd of September, at 
10 a. m., if notified by you, upon receipt of this communication, that 
this arrangement meets your approbation. Should the day ap- 
pointed prove too rough for the meeting, the following day at the 
same hour can be understood as appointed for the meeting. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

SAM. JONES, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. Dept. of S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 

Charleston, S. C, September 16, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Commanding U. S. Forces, Hilton Head, S. C. : 
General : In reply to your communication of the 11th instant, I 
have the honor to say that by the next flag of truce I will return to 
you all medical officers confined in this department, in accordance 
with the cartel and the precedents established between ourselves, 
but I do not understand that sutlers and assistant sutlers are com- 
prehended in this arrangement (see article 3, Cartel, General Orders, 
142, War Department, Washington, September 25, 1862). I will, 
however, exchange them for citizens captured recently in Mcintosh 
County, Ga., by your naval forces. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

SAM. JONES, 
Major- General, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. Dept. of S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 

Charleston, S. C, September 16, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Commanding U. S. Forces, Hilton Head: 
General : In reply to your communication of the 13th instant, I 
have the honor to say that it will not be convenient to substitute the 
Savannah River oflP Jones' Island as a place of meeting for flag of 
truce between us. For ordinary purposes of communication Port 
Royal Ferry is convenient, and where transportation is required the 
appointed place in Charleston Harbor, although liable to some inter- 
ruption from rough weather, seems to me equally convenient and 
eligible to both parties. 

Verv respectfully, your obedient servant, 

SAM. JONES, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Engineer Office, Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 16, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Commanding Department, of the South : 
General : In accordance with your instructions, I started froiji 
this post with the armed transport Island City about 2 a. m. of the 



292 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. ILVn. 

7th of September, arriving at Light-House Inlet ahout 9 a. m. _ A 
heavy gale from the northeast set in about 4 a. m., and blew steadily 
for three days, keeping me shut up in the inlet. On the morning of 
the 8th, the armed transport Golden Gate arrived at Light-House 
Inlet and reported to me. From her I learned that the Plato had 
attempted to join us, but had been obliged to put back. 

At 3 p. m. , September 10, I took on board my two steamers two 
companies of the One hundred and twenty -seventh New York Vol- 
unteers, numbering in the aggregate 120 men, with 6 officers. Cap- 
tains Little and Weston were in command. I also took on board 
some cask buoys. The hay bales on board the steamer were arranged 
on the promenade deck, to serve as a breast-height for infantry and 
to protect the pilot-house. Having got everything on board, I left 
the inlet and communicated with Captain Green, U. S; Navy,_ com- 
manding in Charleston Harbor. He referred me to Captain De 
Camp, of the Wabash, which ship I reached about sundown. Cap- 
tain De Camp gave me two large launches, which we took in toAv. 
About an hour afterward two armed launches reported to me, one 
from the U. S. steamer Nipsic, and the other from the U. S. steamer 
Winona. They were also taken in tow. At early daylight we sailed 
for Dewees Inlet. It being dead low water when we arrived, the 
steamers were afraid to go in. I therefore put all the men I could 
into the two boats of the Wabash and into the two ship's boats, and 
rowed over the bar. The channel was easily found, and we got in 
without any trouble. One company, under Captain Weston, landed 
on Long Island, and explored it for about a mile and a quarter. 
They found the tracks of a cavalry picket who had made oS at our 
approach. There were no roads, nor any signs of the island being 
inhabited. It is heavily wooded. The other company landed on 
Dewees Island, and explored for about a quarter of a mile back from 
the beach. There are three houses on the shore of Dewees Inlet. 
They were all deserted, and had been so apparently for some time. 
Some men's tracks were seen, but we could not find any one. 

In the meanwhile the two steamers had entered the inlet, but I 
sent them out again, as I did not wish to be hampered with them or 
run the risk of losing them. They were ordered to buoy out the 
channel and wait off the bar until 5 p. m., and then proceed to 
Capers' Inlet and wait for us to join them. Having in view the 
rescue of escaped prisoners and refugees, I did not think it advisable 
to approach the mainland with any show of force. I therefore 
directed the lieutenant commanding the boat from the Island City 
to proceed cautiously in the direction of Fuller's house, concealing 
his movements as well as he could. His orders were to approach 
near enough to examine the landing and ascertain whether there 
were any troops there. In case it was unoccupied he was to land, 
but not to venture into the country. He was also directed to take., 
soundings as he went along. I desired him if possible to come back 
by the channel laid down on the map as running from Fuller's 
toward Capers' Inlet. If this could not be done he was to return by 
way of Dewees Inlet. The boat from the Golden Gate was left on 
picket in Dewees Inlet to warn him of danger on his return. In 
case the enemy should attempt to prevent their returning by way of 
Dewees both boats were to come out by Capers'. The first boat 
reached a point within 100 OT 300 yards from Fuller's house. The 
intervening space was occupied by a mud flat over which his boat 
would not float, In endeavoring to discover a channel he was seen 



Chap. XLVU.] COEEESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. * 293 

and fired on by the enemy, who occupied the place in considerable 
force. There are large salt-works here. The channel, having about 

3 fathoms of water, turns off into Copahee Sound at this point. 
Near the end of the sound a heavy work could be seen on the shore 
of the mainland. The line of works across Christ Church Parish 
probably rests on this work. It being impossible to get into the 
channel I had indicated the boat returned the same way it had 
come. The two boats then crossed the bar and joined their respect- 
ive steamers. A few cavalry came down on the point of Long 
Island as they were going out. The steamers then went to Capers' 
Inlet and anchored off the bar. 

In the meanwhile I proceeded with the other boats into the open 
water behind Dewees Island. We found there an average depth of 
one fathom ; no channel was found. We attempted to penetrate the 
belt of islands which traverse this sheet of water, but without suc- 
cess, as the water was too shallow. We got far enough, however, 
to see that mud flats extended to the shore with only a few inches of 
water on them. The shore was strongly picketed. I then con- 
tinued across the sound and turned down into Capers' Inlet. We 
landed near the upper end and attempted to explore, but the under- 
brush was too thick. The houses were deserted, but had been occu- 
pied within a month by rebel soldiers. No inhabitants could be 
found. We remained here several hours, and then re-embarking, 
pulled down to the mouth of the inlet. A stiff breeze was blowing 
and the sea broke heavily over the whole bar. As it would have 
been unsafe to go out, we encamped for the night on the point of 
Capers' Island. I had it explored for about three-fourths of a mile, 
but could find no recent signs of the enemy. Some old picket sta- 
tions were discovered. 

The next morning, the wind having gone down, I communicated 
with the steamers and directed them to proceed to Price's Inlet. They 
were to land troops and examine the inlet and buoy out the channel. 
This was done. Meanwhile I started for Price's Inlet. I took the 
channel nearest Capers' Island, thinking it the deepest. In this 
supposition I was correct. It can be divided into three parts indi- 
cated on the map, the average depth of which are, respectively, 3 
fathoms, H, and 2 fathoms. The open water lying between this 
channel and the mainland is very shallow. It was all bare when I 
saw it. We landed once during this trip on Capers' Island, where 
we found a good landing-pier. We finally reached Price's Inlet, 
where the other boats were waiting for us. I sent out word to the 
steamers to enter the inlet and buoy out the channel. This was 
done. I then embarked the troops and started to return. We left 
the boats at their respective ships and landed the troops on Morris 
Island. I then pushed on for the Head, where I arrived about 11 
p. m. 

Dewees Inlet bar has 9 feet of water at dead low tide. The chan- 
nel is peculiar, resembling that at Saint Augustine. After crossing 
the bar the water deepens at once to 3 or 3 fathoms. The most water 
is found close to the breakers. After once entering the inlet the 
lead gives .about 5 fathoms. The stream leading up toward Fuller's 
had about 3 fathoms up to the point where it turns into Copahee 
Sound. The two channels leading behind Dewees Island are about 

4 fathoms deep. Across the flats we had about 1 fathom. 
Capers' Inlet has about 3 fathoms, but the bar is impassable to any 

vessel. From Capers' to Price's Inlet there is a good channel. The 



294 • S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVU. 

middle part is rather narrow and crooked, but there is never less 
than li fathoms. The outer portions are fine, wide streams, having 
3 and 3 fathoms of water, respectively. Price's Inlet is large and 
roomy, nearly twice as wide as Dewees, which is about the width of 
Light-House Inlet. We found no bottom at 5 fathoms. The bar is 
good and the channel unusually straight. We found about 1 fathom 
on the bar at low water. A large, fine stream forms the connection 
between Price's Inlet and Bull's Bay by way of Sewee Bay. It 
looked very deep, but I did not have time to explore it. We may 
therefore assume safely that there is a good water communication, 
having at least G feet of water at the lowest tide, extending from 
Bull's Bay at least to the end of Copahee Sound, if not further; 
also that Dewees and Price's Inlets are perfectly practicable for 
blockade-runners of considerable draught of water. 

There seems to be no good place to approach the shore, which ap- 
pears guarded by extensive mud flats ; it is also strongly picketed. 
I could see fires burning along the shores of the mainland at sliort 
intervals. The sea islands have only a few people on them, who are 
there probably to signal to the mainland and to blockade-runners. 
All these islands are heavily wooded. 

I am, general, very respectfully, voxir obedient servant, 

' CHAS. R. SUTER, 
Chief Engineer, Dex>artm,ent of the South. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 17, 1864. 

General Richard Delafield, 

Chief of Engineers, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C. : 
General : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
letter of the 9th instant in relation to the proposed trial of the new 
pontoon-boats built for General Woodbury. I shall be happy to 
have these boats sent to this department, and will see that a fair trial 
is made of them, and a proper report prepared by Captain Suter, 
U. S. engineer. Although the wooden pontoon train has been denied 
to us, we shall be able, by means of the old boats that can be repaired 
and by the new boats that are rapidly being built in the engineer 
yard, to provide a sufficient wooden pontoon train to insure a fair 
trial of the two constructions. 
Respectfully, yours, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, Septemher 18, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, 

Commanding Confederate Forces, Charleston, S. C. : 
General : I have the honor to acknowledge the recepit of your 
communication of the 16th instant, stating that it will not be conven- 
ient to you to receive in the Savannah River the 5 privates due you 
upon former exchange between us, and appointing the outer harbor 
CI Charleston, on Friday, the 53d instant, at 10 a. m., as the time and 



Chap. XLVIL] COKEESPONDENCE, ETC. — rWION. 295 

place for their delivery. As these men are due to you I must accede 
to your selection of time and place, as also to your further sug- 
gestion that should the day appointed prove too rough for the meet- 
ing, the following day at same hour shall be understood as appointed. 
I will at the same time receive the families holding my permits to 
enter our lines, and will also turn over to your staff officer some 
boxes sent to me by their personal friends for U. S. officers, prisoners 
of war, in your hands at Charleston. These boxes contain such ar- 
' tides as clothing, writing paper, smoking material, and books. I 
have directed the batteries on Morris Island to cease firing from 8 on 
the morning of the 23d instant until after your flag-of-truce boat 
has returned to Charleston. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-Oeneral, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, • 
' Hilton Head, S. G., September 19, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. George D. Ramsay, 

Chief of Ordnance, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C. ; 

General : I have the honor to inclose you extracts from a letter 
received this day from General Saxton, commanding Northern Dis- 
trict, which I forward to you for your information. The representa- 
tions made by General Saxton are confirmed by my personal obser- 
vation, and I feel satisfied that the ammunition expended in this 
department is all turned to the best possible account. My object in 
calling your attention to this matter is to explain my reasons for 
making what may appear large requisitions for ordnance stores. 
We are about out of ammunition for the guns in the front batteries 
of Morris and Folly Islands, and have been obliged to reduce the 
fire so as to almost entirely stop it, thereby giving the enemy oppor- 
tunities of repairing Sumter, which they have taken advantage of 
with great energy. 

I also inclose you extracts from General Saxton's letter concerning 
telescopic rifles. I think there is no place where from ten to fifty of 
these rifles could be used to better advantage than in the front works 
of Morris Island. I would respectfully suggest that from ten to 
fifty of these rifles be sent here. 

T have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 

^^^■^^"'' J. G. FOSTER, 

Major-Qeneral, Commanding. 

[Inolosure.] 

The shelling from the enemy's mortars was severe this morning in 
cur front works, and having but little mortar powder, we were un- 
able to reply effectually. The mortars were very much needed 
to-day I regret that our ordnance supplies are so scanty that I 
cannot make a decent defense of this important post. No powder 
for the mortars ; no suitable, fuses for the fire on Charleston ; no 
shells for the 30-pounder Parrotts, a most useful gun for silencmg 
the enemy's fire ; no material for making cartridge bags, or grease for 
lubricating the projectiles. I shall do all in my power with what I 



296 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVU. 

have, but these deficiencies in material, which are of such vital im- 
portance to successfxil operations, I deem it my duty to call your 
attention to the subject in the hope that they may be soon supplied. 
More ammunition for the 300-pounder, the most useful guns in these 
work's, is also very much needed. 

Within the last two days the work on this battery (naval batterj') 
has been greatly interfered with by a corps of sharpshooters which 
the enemy has stationed on Fort Sumter. The bullets came in very 
thick when I was at the front this morning. I hope if there are any 
telescopic rifles in the department or any can be procured they may 
be sent to me at once. I think I can use them to great advantage. 



Flag-Steamer Philadelphia, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C, September 19, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Hdqrs. Hilton Head : 

General : The 11-inch guns have been mounted and ready to 
open for a week, but are unable to do so, as the parapets, traverses, 
bomb-proofs, &c., are not completed. I have no doubt you desire 
that the battery should be at work at the earliest possible date. 
I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 19, 1864. 
General Saxton, 

Commanding, &c., Morris Island: 
General : I received your letter and have made the necessary 
requisitions by this steamer both for the ammunition and the tele- 
scopic rifles. I have directed Captain Sut'er to proceed at once to 
Morris Island to see that the engineer work is properly commenced 
and pushed forward to completion. The materials for this work 
are waiting transportation at this time. There is also a large 
amount of ammunition awaiting transportation. We have been 
constantly sending up colored recruits and trust they will be of serv- 
ice to you, and that you see them properly put to drill as well as 
fatigue. 

Yours, respectfully and truly, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-Oeneral, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 19, 1864. 
Brigadier-General Saxton, 

Commanding, &c., Morris Island: 

General : I like your General Orders, No. 55,* very much in itself, 
but very much fear that some one of the printed copies will find its 
way into the enemy's camp. It should have been strictly confiden- 

* Reference is probably to General Orders, No. 56, p. 289. 



Cbap. XLVII.5 CORKESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 297 

tial, and in sucli cases it [is] never safe to print. I have known for 
some time that we have spies among us, who have not as yet been 
detected, hence the necessity for extreme caution. In addition to 
the above order I would like you to give detailed orders to each of 
the advanced batteries, Putnam, Chatfield, Seymour, and Strong, 
as to what their garrisons, both ordinary and increased (as at night), 
shall do in case of attack. The main and vital point in all the latter 
instructions will be to do the best under all circumstances, but under 
no circumstances to forget that their imperative duty is to hold 
their own work beyond peradventure. 

Every officer and man in any work of ours who may be surprised 
or taken will be held in the lowest possible estimation thereafter, 
and will be condemned for extreme inefficiency or cowardice. These 
latter orders had better perhaps be given in manuscript. 
Yours, respectfully and truly, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 

P. S. — Let the orders be, in case of attempted escape or rescue, to 
shoot down every rebel found outside the stockade. 



Headquarters District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, September 19, 1864. 
Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Assistant Adjutant- General : 
Captain : The scouts sent by me into Georgia five weeks since 
returned this morning. They report that in Clinch County de- 
serters and others are banded to resist being placed in the rebel 
army. Daily conflicts take place between them and the militia. 
A captain of militia was lately killed in one of these fights. They 
also report that there are at present but 600 men at Savannah 
for its defense. They also report 600 at Altamaha bridge. Several 
hundred of our prisoners are reported as confined in Savannah. 
An expedition from Darien could destroy the Altamaha bridge, 
threaten Savannah, and then destroy the road toward Thomasville, 
retreating to the mouth of the St. Mary's River. The scouts are 
very anxious I should march from here direct via King's Ferry and 
destroy the road. I have not, however, the troops to do it. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 

[Indorsement.] 

Letter of acknowledgment for signature. Cannot send troops to 
do what he suggests. Am ordered to stand strictly on the defensive. 

J. G. F. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Morris Island, S. C, September 20, 1864. 

Col. C. H. Van Wyck, 

Fifty-sixth N. Y. Vols., Comdg. Post of Morns Island, S. C: 
Colonel: The brigadier-general commanding has received in- 
formation that a flag of truce will communicate with the enemy in 



298 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVH. 

Charleston Harbor on Friday next, 23d instant. I am instructed to 
direct that you will cause our batteries to suspend firing on that 
day from 8 a. m. until after the fla^-of-truce boat of the enemy 
has returned to Charleston. Should the weather prove too stormy, 
the flags will meet the following day at same hour. 

1 am, colonel, with great respect, your obedient servant, 

STUART M. TAYLOR. 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 21, 1864. 
Rear- Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, 

Comdg. S. Atlantic Blockading Squad., Port Royal, S. C. : 
Admiral : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
communication bearing date of September 19, stating that the 11- 
inch guns have been mounted and ready to open fire for a week past. 
I have sent some engineers as a re-enforcement to those now at 
Morris Island, in order to hurry up the work on the ti-averses, 
bomb-proofs, and parapets of all the front batteries, and gave orders 
to have work finished as early as practicable. I would much desire 
that the battery should be at work as soon as practicable, as my 
supply of powder for the front batteries is getting low, and in con- 
sequence I have had to slacken fire, which gives the enemy a good 
opportunity to repair damages in Fort Sumter and in the other 
batteries. 

I have the honor to be, admiral, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Flag-Steamer Philadelphia, 
Port Royal Harbor, September 21, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Hdqrs. Hilton Head : 
General : I am much obliged by yours of the 20th, inclosing an 
extract from a report by Captain Suter with regard to the draught 
of water in Dewees and Price's Inlets, and the practicability for 
blockade-runners. In May I caused these inlets and those above to 
be examined. The ofiBcer remained inside on the 23d, 24th, and 25th, 
passing through all the interior passages from Long Island to Bull's 
Bay, where he issued and went on board the U. S. vessel §tationed 
there. It was on this examination that I was disposed to enter these 
places with gun-boats and act in concert with any movement in that 
quarter. Blockade-runners might enter there, but could not pass 
inside of Sullivan's Island, nor perhaps get out of reach of the rifled 
cannon of the vessels. There is, I believe, no doubt that those 
which have entered passed in by Maffitt's Channel, and each has 
been noted at the time ^ two have run aground and were lost not 
long since. I have not lately caused these inlets to be entered, as I 
consider it advisable not to draw attention to the fact that it is feasi- 
ble, until we wish to take a decisive measure, lest the rebels should, 



Chap. XLVII.] COEEESPONDENOE, ETC. UNION. 299 

as they always do, take steps to make it difficult. The possession of 
Long Island would secure us entirely in this direction, and if at any 
time you feel disposed to land there I will act with you. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. S. Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Hdqes. Dept. of S. Caeolina, Geoegia, and Floeida, 

Charleston, S. C, September 22, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Fostee, 

Commanding U. S. Forces, Hilton Head: 
Geneeal : I have been informed that you have in your custody a 
man named J. M. Burnett, a citizen of Georgia, who was seized and 
carried away from his home by a raiding party from one of the ves- 
sels of the blockading squadron off this coast, and that he is to be 
tried on charges setting forth that he fired into the boats of the 
Paul Jones and other boats near Belle Point, Ga. I do not know how 
you regard this man, whether as a Confederate prisoner of war or 
as a captured citizen, but I claim for him all that is due "him in 
either capacity, and have to request that if proceedings are had 
against him you will inform me of the result. In justice to him, I 
inclose papers marked, respectively. A, B, C, and D, bearing on his 
case. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

SAM. JONES, 
Major-General, Commanding. 

[Inclosures.J 

A. 

On boaed the Blockadee, 

Saint Simon's Sound, August 27, 1864. 
To the Citizens of Glynn County: 

I am a prisoner on board this blockader, and the commander says 
Stock well has made an affidavit that I was the Burnett that fired at 
the Paul Jones' boats and killed 2 of their men when the railroad 
bridge was burnt. Also that Mrs. Golden's little boy made affidavit 
that I was one of the citizens that fired at their boats near the salt- 
works at Belle Point, and that I will be sent to Port Royal in a few 
days, and that I must clear myself of these charges. I want the 
citizens to clear me of these false charges through General Jones 
and General McLaws. I wish some of my friends to go and see the 
generals commanding without delay, and have such papers as are 
necessary to clear me of the charges sent by them to the admiral at 
Port Royal. Stockwell certainly made a mistake in names, and he 
will make the correction, unless he did it maliciously. And as to 
the firing on the boats at the salt-works, you all know that it was 
done by the Confederate cavalry and a few of the militia. The 
commander of those cavalry and militia will clear me of the state- 
ment made by the little boy. My friends, I hope you will lose no 
time in getting me sent back to my distressed and destitute family. 
Your distressed fellow-being, 

J. M. BURNETT. 

Do see that my poor, distressed family is taken care of, and do all 
vou can for me to come home as quick as possible. 



300 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVII. 

[iDdorsement.] 

Headquarters, 

Savannah, September 16, 1864. 
Respectfully forwarded. 

The within-named Mr. Btirnett was taken prisoner by a raiding 
party from the Federal navy on the Georgia coast, and it is reported 
that he was being tried by the naval authorities for firing into their 
boats, he not being in the Confederate service. The within affidavits 
have been forwarded to clear him of that accusation. 
Very respectfully, 

L. McLAWS, 
Major-General, Commanding. 

B. 

I 

State op Georgia, Glynn County: 

Personally appeared before me, John M. Tison, a justice of the 
inferior court in and for said county, George W. Stockwell, who, 
being duly sworn, deposeth and saith that he never knew until last 
evening that the boats of the Paul Jones were fired into when they 
went to burn the railroad bridge in said county ; that he was on 
Cumberland Island at the time that it is stated that the boats were 
fired upon, and therefore could know nothing of the parties that did 
so; that he never had any conversation with the Federal officers 
relative to the subject, and that if they have an affidavit that sets 
forth that he stated to any officer in the Federal service, or other 
person, that Julien M. Burnett fired into these boats at the time 
above specified, or at any other time, that such affidavit is a forgery. 

G. W. STOCKWELL. 

Sworn to and subscribed to before me this 31st day of August, 
1864. 

J. M. TISON, 
Justice Inferior Court, Glynn County. 

C. 

State op Georgia, Glynn County : 

Personally appeared before me Mrs. B. Golden, and swears to the 
following : The boy Garrett Golden is her son. He is eleven years 
of age, and from sickness his mind is much affected. 

B. GOLDEN. 

Sworn to before me this 1st day of September, 1864. 

JAMES ROSTELLE, 

Justice of the Peace. 

D. 

I hereby certify that, to my knowledge, the boy Garrett Golden 
was not within 4 miles of the pickets (which engaged the enemy at 
Demery Hammock about the .30th July, 1864) at the time of the en- 
casement, and therefore could not know who was in the engagement. 

JAMES POSTELL, 
Orderly Sergeant, Co. E, Second Battn. Georgia Vols. 

The above sworn to before me this 31st August, 1864. 

JOHN M. TISON, 

Justice Inferior Court. 



Chap. XLVlI.l COERESPOKDENCE, ETC. UNION. 301 

Headquartes District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, Fla., September 23, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Commanding Department of the South: 

General : It would be difficult for any regiment to replace the 
Seventeenth Connecticut in this district, but still I must say that 
the regiment would be a good one for the purpose. It has still a 
year to serve. The colonel has applied for a short leave of absence 
which I have indorsed favorably, and if the Governor was written 
to that the regiment was to be made an artillery regiment, he would, 
I have no doubt, make an effort to fill it up to 1,200, particularly if 
the colonel went himself with the application for the men. 

The Third U. S. Colored Troops, on duty at this post as guard for 
the intrenchments, is very well drilled as an artillery regiment, but 
will not, I hope, be taken from me, as their long practice at the guns 
here has fitted them well for the defense of this post. Colonel 
Doubleday has received his appointment as colonel of a new colored 
regiment. He is a most excellent artillery officer and will have a 
good regiment. As it appears the policy of the Government to give 
us colored troops, would it not be well to request that his regiment 
be sent here ? He desires to come. I have recommended him a leave 
of absence for twenty days. He will in person give you his reasons 
for asking it ; they are, I think, good. Colonel Littlefield should be 
sent here, or some mustering and disbursing officer appointed with 
funds. I am now moving again about the Florida cavalry. I send 
a handbill. The State agents all went away and we had no bounty 
money. An agent from the city of New York is now here with 
money. Colonel Littlefield nearly spoiled the whole thing by giving 
authority to persons to raise companies. The men were not those 
whom Florida men desired to serve under, and they would not en- 
list. The really loyal men of Florida are the most earnest men I 
have seen, and can be intrusted with the selection of their own offi- 
cers. They will have none but good and competent men. Can you 
send me Spencer or Sharps carbines for them and furnish the quar- 
termaster's department with money to buy the horses ? The quar- 
. termaster's department is flat broken here. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 

Brigadier- General. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 24, 1864. 

Rear-Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron: 
Admiral : I have received the accompanying letter* from General 
Jones, containing four inclosures and relating to J. M. Burnett, who 
is stated to be in our ciistody. As he was captured by a boat from 
your squadron and has not been in my possession, I have the honor 
to refer this letter and inclosures to you. I have notified General 
Jones of this reference. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 

♦iSeep. 299. 



302 



S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XL.VU. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 34, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, 

Comdg. Confederate Forces, Charleston, S. C. : 
General : In reply to your communication of the 22d instant in 
relation to the case or J. M. Burnett, and containing four inclosures 
pertaining thereto, I have the honor to say that he is not, and has 
not been, in my custody. You state that he was captured by a raid- 
ing party from one of the vessels of the blockading squadron. He 
may be, therefore, in the custody of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, com- 
manding the squadron, to whom I have accordingly referred your 
letter with its inclosures. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major- General, Commanding^ 



Headquarters District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, Fla., September 35, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Commanding Department of the South : 
General : I am informed by deserters, and also by one of my 
scouts, that there is at Camp Pinckney, on the Saint Mary's River, 
5,000 barrels of resin and 70 barrels of turpentine. This is barreled, 
and there is in vats 3,000 barrels of soft turpentine. On the north 
side of thpSatillo River, only a few miles from Jefferson, there are 
three plantations on which there are 500 negroes. If you do not 
object I propose getting in the resin and turpentine immediately, 
and shall also send a scout through Nassau County to arrest and 
bring into our lines as pi-isoners every able-bodied man. By the 
call of the Governor of Florida, all men capable of bearing arms 
are in service and should be held as prisoners for exchange when- 
ever taken, although they may not be actually under arms at the 
time of capture. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



General Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department of the South, 

No. 139. S Hilton Head, S. C, September 36, 1864. 

In honor of some of the brave officers who have served in this 
department, the most of whom having lost their lives in the present 
rebellion, the new works lately erected will hereafter be known bj 
the following names : 

The works within the intrenchments at Hilton Head will be known 
as Fort Sherman, after Brig. Gen. Thomas W. Sherman, U. S. Vol- 
unteers, formerly commanding this department. 

The work at Mitchelville will be known as Fort Howell, after Brig. 
Gen. Joshua B. Howell, formerly colonel of the Eighty-fifth Penn- 
sylvania Volunteers, killed at Petersburg, Va., September 14, 1864. 

The work at Beaufort, 8. C, will be known as Fort Stevens, after 
Brig. Gen. I. I. Stevens, U. S. Volunteers, killed at the battle of 
Chantilly. Va., September 1, 1862. 



Chap. XLVIL] COEEESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 303 

The work at Spanish Wells will be known as Battery Holbrool^ 
after First Lieut. Henry Holbrook, Third Ehode Island Volunteer 
Artillery, killed on Morris Island, S. C, August 21, 1863. 
By command of Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster : 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Headqttartees Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 27, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, 

Commanding Confederate Forces, Charleston, S. C. : 
General : I have been officially informed that yellow fever exists 
at the present time in Charleston, and that there is good reason to 
suppose that it also prevails in Savannah. I have therefore the 
honor to notify you that none of the civilians who have heretofore 
received permits to enter the lines of this department will be received . 
by me until the first day of November, 1864. May I request you to 
have suitable notice of this given to all such persons? Their permits 
have passed through your headquarters. 
Very respectfully, yours, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-Qeneral, Commanding. 



Headquarters District op Florida, 

Jacksonville, Fla., September 27, 1864. 

Col. A. L. Harris, 

Comdg. Seventy-fifth Ohio Volunteer Mounted Infantry : 

Colonel : The bad conduct of the troops under your command on 
the Gainesville raid has been reported to me from several different 
sources. In positive violation of my orders just issued, your men 
disgraced their country by their lawless pillaging. That troops so 
little under discipline meet with a disgraceful defeat is not surpris- 
ing. You will be held strictly accountable for the acts of your men 
on the expedition on which you are now starting. Colonel Noble 
has instructions to execute immediately any man found pillaging 
and to report to me the general conduct of your command. 
Very respectfully, 

JN.O. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, Fla., September 27, 1864. 

Col. William H. Noble, 

Commanding, Magnolia, Fla. : - 
Colonel : I have the honor herewith to transmit a copy of a com- 
munication* just received from Colonel Wilcoxson. The general 
commanding desires that you take- such steps as are necessary. A 
force of 100 cavalry has been ordered to report to you at Saint 

*Not found. 



304 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLvn. 

Augustine. The general commanding suggests that the expedition 
sTiould be of cavalry and infantry combined, and that you may take 
such portion of infantry as you choose from Magnolia. 

I have the honor to be, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

THORNDIKE D. HODGES, 
Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters District of Florida, 

Jacksonville, Fla., September 27, 1864. 

Col. William H. Noble, 

Commanding District South of Saint Augustine : 
Colonel : In marching through the country you will exercise the 
greatest vigilance in protecting its people from those bad soldiers 
who disgrace the arms of their country by pillaging. Immediate 
trial and execution of the offenders on the spot where the offense is 
committed will be resorted to if other means fail. 

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding^ 



Morris Island, S. C, September 28, 1864. 

Major-General Foster, 

Commanding : 
General : I inclose for your information two communications, 
which were intercepted to-day. I propose to give General Beaure- 
gard a salute in Charleston this evening from my 200-pounders. 
Yours, sincerely, 

R. SAXTON, 
Brigadier- General. 

[Inclosures.] 
(Battery Bee to Beach Inlet.) 

Lieutenant Roberts, 
Captain Aldret, 

Steamer Rebel : 
As soon as stores are discharged report the steamer to Major Var- 
dell, at Kinloch's Landing. 

PRINGLE, 

3Iajor. 

(Beach Inlet to Battery Bee.) 

R. North: 

Captain Smith requests that you will let us know when General 
Beauregard crossed the bridge. 

FAN, 
Lieutenant, Adjutant of Post. 



Chap. XLVII.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 305 

(Battery Bee to Beach lolet.) 

Lieutenant Egberts, 
Capt. R. P. Smith : 

General Beauregard is at Sullivan's Island wharf. 

R. NORTH. 



Washington, September 29, 1864. 
General J. G. Foster: 

My Dear General : I am greatly obliged for the photograph 
you sent me, giving the condition of Sumter on the 1st instant. We 
have Gillmore's photographs, or rather sketches, at two former 
periods and produced by guns of different calibers and from different 
distances. It is now of much interest to know the exact distances of 
the different batteries, caliber of guns, and number of rounds fired 
from each. The question and subject is important that we may 
guard against exposing such masonry to such artillery for such 
periods, and it is desirable to learn how long such masonry is at all 
reliable for any particular period. If through your engineer and 
artillery officers you can give me detailed information and forward 
me several copies of the best photograph of the actual condition of 
Sumter, taken with the best light upon it, you will still further 
oblige me, and promote the interest of our service. Should you find 
time to make it an official paper, it would be very acceptable. 

The report from Petersburg for August says 8,275 rounds of siege 
ammunition were fired, 1,605 from guns and 6,670 rounds from 
mortars, making a total of about 160 tons of iron during the month. 
Corresponding facts with results in relation to Sumter would be 
very satisfactory. 

Respectfully and truly, yours, 

RICHARD DELAFIELD, 
Brigadier-General and Chief of Engineers. 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Deft, of the South, 

Morris Island, S. C, September 29, 1864. 
Colonel Hartwell, 

Commanding Post, Folly Island : 
Colonel : I am directed to say to you that the suggestion of 
Major Wales, commanding outpost on Long Island, S. C., that the 
position of the several posts under his control be changed so as to 
deceive the enemy shoiild the two deserters inform as to their locality, 
meets with the entire approval of the brigadier-general command- 
ing. They should be changed without delay. I am also instructed 
to state that Brigadier-General Saxton deems it advisable that col- 
ored soldiers be ordered to relieve those men of the Fifty-fourth 
New York Volunteers, on duty at Long Island and elsewhere at the 
outposts of Folly Island, who are not considered trustworthy. Sol- 
diers about whom there is the slightest doubt as to their fidelity 
should not .be placed in positions where the temptation may be 
offered them to quit their post or desert to the rebels. 

I am, colonel, with great respect, your obedient servant, 

STUART M. TAYLOR, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 

20 R R— VOL XXXV, FT II 



306 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE »A. COAST. [Chap. XLVII. 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 30, 1864. 

Rear- Admiral John A. Dahlgren, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron : 

Admiral : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
communication of the 29th instant, answering General Jones' letter 
of the 22d, concerning a prisoner in your custody, and returning his 
letter with its four inclosures, marked A, B, C, and D. By the next 
flag of truce I will send a copy of your letter to -General Jones, ac- 
cording to permission contained therein. 

Very respectfidly, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, September 30, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, 

Comdg. Confederate Forces, Charleston, S. C. : 

General : I have the honor to inclose a copy of a letter* this day 
received by me from Admiral Dahlgren, in reply to the inquiries in 
your letter to me of the 22d instant. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Hdqrs. Dept. of S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 

Charleston, S. C, September 30, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Commanding U. S. Forees, Hilton Head: 

General : In accordance with your request expressed verbally by 
Lieutenant-Colonel Woodford, of your staif , to Captain Soule, assist- 
ant adjutant-general of my staff, I have authorized Major Lay, of 
my staff, to receive under flag of truce in this harbor, on Monday, 
the 3d of October, such packages as you may desire to deliver for 
the use of the Federal prisoners confined in this department, and to 
renew the assurance formerly given you that they shall be distrib- 
uted in accordance with your wishes. 

I have the honor to forward for the use of our prisoners confined 
in your department certain packages (an invoice of .which will tJe 
rendered) sent to them by their friends, and to request that you will 
receive them and give such orders as may insure their safe delivery 
to the officers to whom they are sent. 

Very respectfully, vour obedient servant, 

SAM. JONES, 
Major-General, Commanding. 

* Not found. 



Chap. XLVU.] COERESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. 307 

Flag-Steamer Philadelphia, 
Port Royal Harhor, S. C, October 1, 18G4. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Hdqrs. Hilton Head: 
General : I send you some deserters from Battery Marshall, who 
will give you some account of the works there. By their account, 
some 200 or 300 Union troops are working near Battery Marshall 
for the sake of getting clothing and shoes to wear, being nearly 
destitute. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. S. Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, October 3, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff, Armies of U. S., Washington, D. C. : 
General : I have the honor to furnish an extract from a report 
made by one John Van Dailey, a deserter from Clinch's Light Bat- 
tery, which is stationed at Camp Isle of Hope, southeast of Savannah , 

The whole dependence of the South is upon the election, in the .success of a man of 
]»ace principles, it being openly avowed in the streets of Savannah that if Lincoln 
is re-elected they will of necessity at once have to yield, and they are only awaiting 
the election in the North. 

I havQ the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South. 

Hilton Head, S. C, October 3, 1864. 
Rear-Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, 

Comdg. S. Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Port Royal, S. C. : 
Admiral : Referring to the subject of the jurisdiction of Bay 
Point I have the honor to propose the following, viz : To remove the 
garrison from Fort Seward and turn it over to your jurisdiction 
after removing the guns and carriages, which it is understood are 
not desired by you and will be of value to me in arming the new 
field forts at this place and Beaufort. I thus turn over the whole 
.jurisdiction of Bay Point and as much of Phillips Island as you de- 
sire', with the distinct understanding, however, that whenever the 
Engineer Department of the United States requires the site for the 
erection of permanent fortifications for the defense of the harbor it 
shall be yielded up for that purpose. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Flag-Steamer Philadelphia, 
Port Royal Harbor, October 3, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Hdqrs. Hilton Head : 
General : I have received yours of to-day in relation to Fort 
Seward and Phillips Island. I accept of the proposition made 



308 



S. C, FLA., ATSD ON THfe GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVII. 



therein, and whenever the Engineer Department may choose to re- 
sume the site tlms conditionally ceded, it will be relinquished at once. 
I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. S. Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Indorsement.] 

October 3, 1864. 
Issue orders to the ordnance department to remove the guns and 
carriages from Fort Seward at once. The guns are to be used to arni 
Forts Sherman, Howell, and Stevens, the selection of the guns for 
each being made by Captain Suter. The present garrison of Fort 
Seward will help dismount and load the guns, and will then rejoin 
their regiment. 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



General Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department of-the South, 

No. 143. S Hilton Head, S. C, October 3, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. E. P. Scammon, U. S. Volunteers, having reported in 
accordance with Special Orders, No. 301, current series, from the 
War Department, he is hereby assigned to the command of the 
Northern District of this department, and will relieve Brigadier-Gen- 
eral R. Saxton without delay. 

Brij^. Gen. R. Saxton, on being relieved, will resume command of 
the District of Beaufort. 

By command of Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster : 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, October 3, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. E. P. Scammon, 

Comdg. Northern District, Dept. of the South : 

General : In taking command of the Northern District and re- 
lieving General Saxton, I desire to call your attention to the follow- 
ing points which seem to be of the most importance, viz : 

After making yourself thoroughly acquainted with the troops of 
your command, their condition, position, &c., you will next exam- 
ine into the condition and position of the different batteries. The 
chief of artillery, Lieutenant-Colonel Ames, will be able to give you 
the necessary information concerning these batteries, with the details 
in relation to their condition, armament, &c. It will be necessary to 
visit them all in person, accompanied by the chief of artillery, and I 
recommend that this be done at once, as soon as you are settled in 
your 'quarters. The batteries on Long Island, Cole's Island, and 
Black Island, being the advanced picket batteries toward the enemy, 
need not be visited immediately upon your arrival, but should be 
inspected by you as soon as practicable in order for you to obtain a 
perfect knowledge of their condition and position. I wish all the 



Ohap. XLVII ] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — UNION. ' 309 

troops to be reviewed and inspected as soon as the work and the 
weather will permit you to do so. The orders given from these 
headquarters respecting the work now going on on Morris Island 
are to the effect : 

First. To build a new palisading all around Fort Putnam, includ- 
ing the recent addition of the six-gun naval battery ; to complete 
this battery and to provide proper flanking defense for its face, 
bomb-proofs, &c. The reverse of this battery is to have a stockade 
with loop-holes for infantry. As many more 200-pounders as room 
can be found for will also be placed in this battery, for the treble 
object of firing on the city, Fort Sumter, and Sullivan's Island. 

Second. To renew or repair the palisading around Batteries 
Chatfield and Seymour so as to connect the two. More guns and 
mortars are also to be placed in these batteries where room can 
be found by connecting the two. The most important part in re- 
gard to these batteries at present is to have the palisading around 
them made so strong and perfect as to prevent the possibility of 
the enemy taking these batteries by a surprise or boat attack. The 
objects of the fire of these batteries at the front are, generally. 
Fort Sumter, the channel, or rather such blockade-runners .which 
may attempt to run in or out, and the city. Occasionally a few 
shots will be fired at the enemy's batteries on Sullivan's Island, 
Avhen the fire of the enemy's batteries becomes too annoying. Gen- 
erally, however, these batteries at the extreme front are to be hus- 
banded for future work, and therefore placed and maintained in 
perfect repair and efficiency. Generally, Fort Strong will return 
the fire from the enemy, gun for gun, from 100-pounder Parrotts. 

Third. Fort Strong. This is regarded as the citadel of the works 
on the upper end of Morris Island. It is strongly armed and will 
be so maintained and also strongly manned. Care must always 
be taken that its palisading round it is kept in perfect repair, and 
that its garrison is good, well instructed, and vigilant. 

Fourth. The remaining batteries on Morris Island and the other 
islands have all peculiar duties, but do not require general directions 
except the general one that the garrisons must be kept in good con- 
dition and well instructed. The forts at Light-House Inlet have 
orders to return the fire from the forts of Secessionville gun for gun. 
Here it is necessary to make a general remark. The forts and bat- 
teries must have as experienced artillerists as it is possible to obtain, 
but as the artillery force proper is very small and diminishing very 
fast by the expiration of the term of enlistments of the men it is 
necessary to use infantry for this duty. Great care must be taken 
to select the best regiments and best men and officers for this duty, 
and when infantry thus selected become good artillerists they must 
be continued on that duty as long as their conduct is satisfactory. 

Fifth. The rebel prisoners of war in the palisades will require the 
utmost care and attention as regards their security ; the Fifty- 
fourth Massachusetts Volunteers are now guarding them and I rec- 
ommend that they be retained on that duty so long as their conduct 
is satisfactory. I have written General Saxton full instructions as 
to the necessity of having detailed instructions given as to the duties 
of each regiment and detachment in case an attempt be made by the 
enemy to escape, or by their friends to rescue them. I believe Gen- 
eral Saxton has given all the orders necessary for the present, 
but constant vigilance will be necessary on your part to see that 



310 ■ S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVH. 

they are obeyed. Modifications will be necessary from time to time 
in accordance with the circumstances. In order to give an oppor- 
tunity to have the camps searched from time to time two schooners 
are anchored in Light-House Inlet, to which the prisoners may be 
moved when necessary. While upon these schooners increased vigi- 
lance should be used to prevent the escape of the men by theii* 
jumping overboard and swimming to the shore. For this purpose, 
in addition to the guards on board, boats well armed must row 
guard all night long around the vessels. A vigilant guard will be 
ke]}t on each sliore liear the vessels, and a good watch kept froip the 
fort on each side the anchorage, and the guns kept charged with 
grape. A cable must be kept on each vessel, and all the steamers 
in the inlet must have a sufficient guard on board to prevent any 

Eossibility of their being captured by a boat attack by the enemy 
aving for its object the rescue of the prisoners. All row-boats not 
needed by the boat infantry for night service as picket-boats or fer- 
riage across the inlet must be taken to the lower end of Folly Isl- 
and and placed in a secure position, if it has not already been done. 
In fine, every means must be taken to provide for every emergency 
and to insure perfect safety. 

Sixth. As to the rate of firing, that upon the city is usually on an 
average of 1 every fifteen minutes, but this may be varied accord- 
ing to circumstances. The firing on Fort Sumter is very slow at 
present, owing to a want of ammtmition, but when a sufficient sup- 
ply arrives, a slow fire, principally shells from mortars, will be kept 
up whenever there is an appearance of working parties being en- 
gaged. The Marsh Angel will fire dark nights all night long at 
irregular intervals, and upon light nights sufficiently to prevent 
their landing supplies on the dock on the left flank. All details 
connected with your command will be obtained from the file of 
OT'ders from these headquartei's in the adjutant-general's office of 
the Northern District. Soon as you send a list of maps in the office 
the duplicates of those we have will be sent you to complete your 
list. The commanding general, having great confidence in your 
judgment and ability, leaves much to your discretion, feeling con- 
fident that everything will receive your prompt and careful con- 
sideration. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, Odober 5, 1864. . 
Brig. Gen. J. P. Hatch, 

Commanding District of Florida, Jacksonville, Fla. : 
General : The yellow fever is now more or less prevalent at 
New Berne, N. C, and within the rebel lines along this coast. 

The major-general commanding directs that immediate steps be 
taken to prevent its appearance within this department. You will 
therefore please see that the camps and all buildings and grounds 
within your district are immediately and thoroughly policed and 
cleansed, and that lime is profusely used, particularly about the 
sinks. The major-general commanding further directs that instruc- 



Chap. XLVn.] CORKESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 311 

tions be given to the officers commanding outposts to admit no de- 
serters or refugees until they have been strictly and rigidly quaran- 
tined. You are requested to keep this matter as quiet as possible. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant- General, 



Headquarters First Separate Brigade, 
Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Morris Island, S, C, October 6, 1864. 
Major-Qeneral Foster, 

Commanding Department ; 
General : The day before yesterday Brigadier-General Saxton 
went with me to the front batteries toward Charleston. I found 
everything in apparently good condition. The earth-works are ex- 
cellent. The new palisading around Fort Putnam, including the 
recent addition of the six-gun navy battery, is nearly completed. 
The flanking arrangement for the latter is such as you desire^ The 
palisading is complete with the exception of looping. In reference 
to palisading between Batteries Chatfield and Seymour, I would 
state that the material does not arrive as fast as it ought, and 1 beg 
that the officers having the matter in charge may send what is re- 
quired with the utmost promptitude. 

To-day I review the troops at this place. To-morrow I propose to 
visit Folly Island, and will then give you a detailed report of the 
condition of my command. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. P. SCAMMON, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding, 



Hdqrs. Northern District, Dept. op the South, 

Morris Island, S. C, October G, 18G4 

Colonel Hallowell, 

In Charge of Prisoners' Camp : 
Colonel : I am instructed to inform you that the brigadier-geU' 
eral commanding consents that the rebel officers, prisoners of war, 
now in your hands, located oil Morris Island, be permitted to 
purchase such articles, not contraband, from the sutler as they may 
from time to time desire. These purchases are to be made under 
the superintendence of Capt. Thomas Appleton, Fifty-fourth Massa- 
chusetts Volunteers, provost-marshal, Northern District. I am also 
charged to direct that you cause this communication to be read to 
the prisoners for their benefit, in order that all who desire it may 
avail themselves of this privilege. Those officers who may. be in 
need of money will be afforded facilities for obtaining it. Lights 
will also be permitted them, to be extinguished, however, at such an 
hour of the evening as you may see fit to designate. The candles 
can be purchased from the sutler. 

I am, colonel, very respectfiilly, your obedient servant, 

STUART M. TAYLOR, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



312 S. C, FLA., AKD ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVH. 

Hdqes. Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Morris Island, S. C, October 6, 1864. 
Colonel Hallowell, 

In Charge of Prisoners' Camp: 
Colonel: The brigadier-general commanding instructs me to 
direct that you will please make requisition at once on the quarter- 
master's department for a sufficient amount of lumber to build proper 
sinks for the use of the rebel officers, prisoners of war in our hands, 
now located on this island. These sinks should be inside of the dead 
line, and the vault dug to such a depth that they will not be rendered 
offensive. I am directed to inform you that the brigadier-general 
commanding is not desirous that the prisoners should be employed 
to empty their sink tubs, our own officers in the hands of the rebel 
authorities not being subjected to this indignity, but the general 
intends to extend to them such treatment as the general is informed, 
and knows from personal experience, is given to the officers of the 
U. S. Army now m possession of the enemy. Hence this desire that 
the custom now in force of using sink tubs be dispensed with, and 
that proper arrangements be promptly made by you to render their 
lot less unpleasant to the prisoners in this particular. If upon in- 
vestigation you find that the plan would be impracticable, on account 
of water coming up too hi^, or in any other way objectionable, 
you will please report the fact to these headquarters in order that 
other measures may be adopted. 

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

STUART M. TAYLOR, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters First Separate Brigade, 
Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Morris Island, 8. C, October 8, 1864. 
Colonel Van Wyck, 

5^th N. Y. Vols., Comdg. Post, Morris Island, S. C. : 
Colonel : The brigadier-general commanding directs that you 
cause a competent medical officer to visit daily the camp of the rebel 
officers, prisoners of war, and extend to those confined there such 
medical treatment as they may from time to time require. 

I am, colonel, with great respect, your obedient servant, 

STUART M. TAYLOR, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, October 10, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, 

Comdg. Confederate Forces, Charleston, S. C. : 

General : In reply to your letter of the 30th ultimo, requesting 
me to receive certain packages for the use of your prisoners con- 
fined in this department, and to give such orders as would insure 
their safe delivery to the -officers to whom they were sent, I have 
the honor to state that they have been safely delivered to such 
officers under the personal superintendence of Lieutenant-Colonel 



Chap. ILVH.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 313 

Woodford, of ray staff. They were received from your staff officer 
on tlie 3d instant and delivered to your prisoners on the 5th. I have 
the honor to inclose a copy of a receipt taken from your officers upon 
the delivery of the packages to them. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, October 13, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. R. Delafield, 

Chief of Engineers, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C. : 

General : I have the honor to inform you that I have, in com- 
pany with Captain Suter, U. S. Engineers, made an inspection of 
Fort Clinch and its surroundings. We arrived at a definite con- 
clusion as to the changes that should be made in the plan in order 
to render the work efficient. The short interval before the sailing 
of the Fulton will not allow time to prepare a full report.- I will, 
however, say that the proposed changes embrace the following 
points, viz : 

First. The abolition of the chemin'de ronde, the closing up of its 
loop-holes, and the removal of the parapet forward to it as a scarp 
wall. Also raising the parapet. 

Second. The removal of the heavy guns from the bastionettes, 
the substitution of a flanking center pintled howitzer in its place, 
and the covering of its parapet with 2 feet of earth. 

Third. The substitution of a counterscarp of masonry for the 
countersloping one of earth, the narrov/ing of the ditch, and the 
introduction of a wet ditch 15 feet in width next the counterscarp, 
leaving a beam of 20 feet width next the scarp. The wet ditch to 
be 6 feet in depth at high water. 

Fourth. The changing the entrance either to the left flank or the 
left face of the work. 

Fifth. The construction of the magazines imder the parapet or 
rampart at each salient, witli entrances from the galleries' leading 
to the lower stories of the bastionettes. 

Sixth. The formation of three casemated traverses on each face 
and flank and on the gorge. 

Seventh. The construction of only one or two of the officers quar- 
ters inside the fort, and to make these only two stories high, the 
other quarters to be erected outside on the beach. 

A more complete statement will be prepared for the next steamer. 
The maps received from the engineer office represent a portion of 
the sand hills which command the terre-plein of the work, favorable 
for the establishment of batteries, to Avhich you refer in your letter. 
The originals ought to be in the office. The hill with the summit 
(reference at [39]) is not yet removed or leveled, although those 
nearer the fort have been partially so. Beyond this about 350 
yards, and extending to the distance of 1 mile, good beaching dis- 
tance with rifled cannon against masonry, are ranges of sand hills 
extremely favorable to the establishment of breaching batteries of 
such magnitude as to require the labor of 1,000 men for six months 



^14 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVIL 

to level them. The fort, therefore, should be made capable of with- 
standing the battering of breaching batteries and still be secure 
against assault. Its isolated position on the southern coast makes 
this the more important. 
I have the honor to be, verv respectfuUv, vour obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-Oeneral, Commanding. 



Headquarters First Separate Brigade, 
Northern District, Dept. op the South, 

Morris Island, S.C., October 13, 1864. 
Col. A. S. Hartwell, 

55th Massachusetts Vols. , Comdg. Post of Folly Island : 
Colonel; By direction of the brigadier-gen,eral commanding I 
have the honor to invite your attention to the following extract from 
the report of October 13, instant, of Capt. Thomas L. Appleton, 
Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Volunteers, provost marshal, Noi'thern 
District, Department of the South: 

The whole force on Long Island is, commissioned officers, 6 ; enlisted men, 192 ; 
which is not enough to do the duty as it ought to be done. The island is 3 miles 
long and I only found six posts at the front, where there should have been double 
that number. 

The brigadier-general commanding directs that you will cause the 
number of posts to be increased if it can be done without detriment 
to the service, and that you will re^jort your action in the matter 
without delay to these headquarters. 

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

STUART M. TAYLOR, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters First Separate Brigade, 
Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Morris Island, S. C, October 19, 1864. 
Col. P. P. Brown, 

Comdg. Post, Morris Island, 8. C. : 
Colonel : The brigadier-general commanding dir<^cts that our 
boat pickets in the creek and river in the direction of James Island 
will be instructed to be particularly observant and active, reporting 
anything that comes under their notice. -Some slight movements 
of the enemy at other points require us to be on the alert. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

THOS. J. ROBINSON, 
First Lieutenant and Actg. Asst. Adjt. Oen. 



Headquarters First Separate Brigade, 
Northern District, Dept. op the South, 

Morris Island, S. C, October 30, 1864. 

Capt. Thomas L. Appleton, 

Provost-Marshal, Nortliern District, Dept. of the South: 
Captain : I am ordered by- the brigadier-general commanding to 
inform you that the rebel prisoners of war are to be transferred to 
Fort Pulaski, Ga., and the One hundred and fifty-seventh New York 



Cbap. xlvh.] correspondence, etc. — UNION. 315 

Volunteers to go as a guard. You are directed to see that everything 
is carried out in as quiet a manner as possible and that thej'be placed 
on board the prison schooner in good time to-morrow morning 
(early). You will consult Colonel Hallowell and have everything 
as regards transportation placed at his disposal in order to carry out 
the instructions given him. 
By order of Brigadier-General Scammon : 

THOS. J. ROBINSON, 
First Lieutenant and Adg. Asst. Adjt. Gen. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, October 30, 1864. 

Brigadier-General Hatch, 

Commanding District of Florida, Jacksonville, Fla. : 
General : On the 2Cth September. I wi-ote requesting you to allow 
no persons to come here from your district of the refugee class unless 
it is upon an absolutely military necessity. Yesterday a Mrs. 
Hutchins ai'rived from Florida by your permission, applied to me 
for a free pass North, which I am unable to give her ; and if it was 
in my power to furnish her transportation, the following extract 
from a letter received from General Halleck by last mail would 
oblige me to detain her in the department unless she desires to re- 
turn to her friends in the rebel lines: 

The War Department does not sanction such passes (permission to go North) unless 
issued by the Secretary himself. The reason is obvious. The very worst traitors 
and spies we have in the Northern States are these very pretending Unionists of 
Nortliern birth who have assisted the rebellion for the last three years, and who are 
now permitted to leave the rebel States simply because they can be of more use to 
them within our lines. Nearly every one permitted to come North is now acting 
tlie part of copperhead and traitor, and the women are the worst of all. 

I would respectfully call your attention to my request conveyed in 
the letter of the 26th of September concerning these persons, and in 
future shall expect you to allow none of them permission to leave 
Florida. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Engineer Department, 

Washington, October 22, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, 

Commanding Department of the South : 
General, : I thank yoii for your communication of the 12th in- 
stant relative to the recent .inspection made by you of Fort Clinch. 
The interesting and instructive ideas it contains will be of much im- 
portance in maturing some definite jilan for the modification of that 
work. I look with interest for the more complete statement you 
promise by the next steamer. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

RICH. DELAFIELD, 
Brigadier- General and Chief of Engineers. 



316 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVH. 

Headquarters First Separate Brigade, 
Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Morris Island, S. C, October 25, 1864. 

Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Asst. Adjt. Gen., Department of the South: 

Captain : I have the honor to report that nothing important has 
occurred in this command for the last ten days. The work up to 
the front is progressing as rapidly as my means will allow ; it could 
be more promptly done had we the means of transportation. The 
naval battery on Cumming's Point is fast approaching completion, 
and every possible exertion is being made to have this work finished. 
Fatigue parties are at work both night and day. I have made some 
changes in the disposition of the troops on Folly and Long Islands, 
by placing three companies of the Fifty -fifth Massachusetts Vol- 
unteers as a permanent force on Long Island. This has been done 
at the suggestions of the chief of artillery, to enable the men to 
become proficient in artillery drill. 

The Fifty-fourth New York Volunteers changed their camp this 
week from their former position near Stono Landing, moving to 
new ground near to and on the right of the white house on Folly 
River. The medical reports show the health of the command to be 
good ; 3 men died from disease and 1 from wounds within the last 
seven days. We have one casualty from the sharpshooters on 
Sumter. 

I would earnestly recommend that some twenty^five or thirty tele- 
scopic rifles be sent to this district for use at the front, as the enemy 
can be very annoying at any time. 

On the morning of the 23d instant, a side- wheel steamer was seen 
ashore almost opposite Battery Rutledge, Sullivan's Island ; she was 
painted lead color and looked to be a fine, large steamer. In- 
closed I furnish a repoi-t made by the chief of artillery, giving par- 
ticulars and number of rounds fired.* We have found out the name 
of the steamer to be Flamingo, and that she was running into 
Charleston when headed off by some of our picket-boats and run 
aground. She now lies a total wreck. 

. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your most obedient 
servant, 

E. P. SCAMMON, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters First Separate Brigade, 
Northern District, Dept. of the South. 

Morris Island, S. C, October 26, 1864. 

Capt. J. F. Green, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding Naval Forces off ChaHeston : 



with 



Captain : I would respectfully make application to be furnished 

with 3,000 feet submarine fuse if you can spare it. I have made 

application to the commanding general of the department to be sup- , 

plied, but find we have noiie on hand, and he has directed me to 

apply to you for it. I desire this for another attempt at Sumter, and 



*See Part I, p. 108. 



Chap. XLVIl.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. ONION. 317 

have all my arrangements made, only waiting the fuse. I can 
use the galvanic cable, but think it too cumbersome. If you can 
accommodate me with this, my ordnance oiiicer will receipt for it. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. P. SCAMMON, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Special Orders, > Hdqrs. Department of the South, 

No. 371. f Hilton Head, S. C, October 36, 1864. 

I. Brig. Gen. E. E. Potter, U. S. Volunteers, is hereby assigned 
temporarily to the command of the Northern District, Department 
of the South, during the illness of Brig. Gen. E. P. Scammon, who 
will, when relieved by General Potter, proceed without delay to 
Hilton Head, S. C, and report in person to the major-general com- 
manding the department. 

II. Col. P. P. Brown, jr., One hundred and fifty-seventh New 
York Volunteers, will, during the temporary absence of Brigadier- 
General Potter, assume command of the District of Hilton Head, 
Fort Pulaski, Saint Helena, and Tybee Islands, and will piake his 
headquarters at Hilton Head, leaving Lieutenant-Colonel Car- 
michael. One hundred and fifty-seventli New York Volunteers, in 
command at Fort Pulaski. 

******* 

By command of Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster : 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, October 27, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, 

Chief of Staff, Washington, D. C. : 

General : I have the honor to inform you that the recent informa- 
tion obtained from deserters and refugees is to the following effect : 

First. Lieut. Gen. W. J. Hardee is in command of the rebel 
Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, with head- 
quarters in Charleston. General Samuel Jones, upon being re- 
lieved, set out for Richmond for assignment to an active command. 

Second. The force of the rebels is 4,000 men in and around 
Charleston, 4,000 men at different points on the railroad to Savan- 
nah, and 7,000 men at Savannah. The latter are, however, mostly 
conscripts, a part of whom are being drilled and got ready to be for- 
warded to Hood's army. The recent sweeping conscription is said 
to have produced in South Carolina and Georgia between 30,000 and 
40,000 men and boys, the most of Avhom are being forwarded to re- 
enforce Hood. The remainder is retained for garrison duty on the 
coast, in addition to the artillery force, which is wholly composed 
of veterans. The rebel leaders intend introducing a law into their 
next Congress authorizing the conscription of all men under sixty. 
Those between fifty and sixty are expected to be able to perform the 
quartermaster, commissary, and other light or bureau duty. 

Third. The rebel preparations for defense still continue with un- 
abated activity ; working parties are constantly engaged upon their 
old batteries in repairs and upon the construction of new ones. Of 



318 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVU. 

these latter one is on James Island, near Fort Johnson ; one on Sul- 
livan'-e Island, one at Mount Pleasant, and several in the city itself. 
Those in the city are arranged to sweep the principal streets. A new 
work has been built near Causten's Bluff, on the Savannah River, 
and several works commenced on Wilmington and Skidaway Isl- 
ands to better guard the approaches in that direction. The old fort 
at Georgetown, S. C. , has been repaired, enlarged, and manned. A 
formidable wooden gun-boat is building on the Great Pedee. Three 
torpedoes are provided to be placed on the Georgetown Bar. One 
very large toi;pedo, to contain over 1,000 pounds of powder, is now 
made and ready to be placed in the position designated for it, which 
is nearly midway between Fort Sumter and Fort Moultrie. 

Fourth. The yellow fever still prevails in Charleston, with over 
20 deaths jier day reported. It has also broken out in Savannah. I 
am informed that it also prevails at Wilmington, N. C. 

The Union officers and men prisoners of war in the hands of the 
I'ebels are distributed as follows, viz : The officers at Columbia, S. 
C, and vicinity; 16,000 men in a stockade at Florence, S. C. ; over 
15,000 men at Savannah, who are to be soon removed to Millen, Ga., 
about 100 miles from Savannah, and placed in a stockade at that 
place, which is now being built. The stockade at Florence, S. C, 
is in a field near the junction of the railroads, and separated from 
the junction by a skirt of woods, as seen in the marginal sketch. 
Our men are permitted to build huts and brush shelters with ma- 
terials obtained from the adjacent wood. They are treated very 
kindly by Colonel Harrison, who. commands the depot and guard of 
1,000 men. They are, however, destitute of blankets and proper 
clothing. Generally their condition is much better than at Ander- 
sonville. No military defenses are as yet erected at this depot. It 
is expected that all the officers and men now at Columbia, S. C, and 
vicinity will very soon be brought to Florence, increasing the whole 
number at that place to 25,000 men and officers. 

The ration issued to the prisoners at Florence consists of one 
pound com meal, one-half pound of fresh meat, or one-quarter 
pound bacon daily. Sometimes a little molasses or vinegar is added. 
To check the prevalence of scurvy issues have been made of chopped 
sweet potatoes soaked in vinegar. The capability of the country to 
furnish supplies to the army and the people seems from reports to 
be adequate to the absolute necessities of both. There is a suffi- 
ciency of corn and meat; of other supplies they have a limited 
amount, and of luxiiries none. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Hilton Head District, 

October 28, 18G4. 
Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Assistant Adjutant-General, Dej)t. of the South : 
Captain : In reply to the communication of the major-general 
commanding of the 24:th instant, I have the honor to submit the fol- 
lowing report : The order to shoot any prisoners who might attempt 
to escape, which I have sinc6' learned was given to my predecessor 
in charge of the prisoners, was not transmitted to me. I first re- 
ceived the order from the major-general commanding on the even- 



Chap. XLVn.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 319 

ing' of the day on which the attempt was made, and the attempt 
was made before I could reach the fort and communicate the order to 
the officer in charge. When I placed the prisoners on board the ves- 
sels in Light-House Inlet I gave general instructions to the 2 officers 
in charge to prevent at all hazards the escape of any prisoners, and 
as both officers had been in charge of the prisoners, and were better 
acquainted with the prisoners and the best method of securing them 
than I was, I left the details to those officers, having the utmost 
confidence in their fidelity and efficiency. They were both fully 
aware that they were authorized to shoot any one should they in 
their judgment find it necessary. In this particular instance the 3 
men were in the water, and as soon as discovered, the captain says, 
made no further attempt to escape, and that he considered them 
completely within his power, and that consequently to secure them 
it was not necessary to shoot them. 

I have the honor to be, captain, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

P. P. BROWN, Jr., 
Colonel 157th Neto York Vols., Comdg. District. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, October 31, 18G4. 
Brig. Gen. John P. Hatch, 

Comdg. District of Florida, Jacksonville, Fla. : 
General : The major-general commanding directs me to state 
that he wishes you to allow no more women or children to come 
within your lines from the rebels if you can possibly avoid it. 
Those who do get in must not be allowed to leave Florida under any 
considerations without authority from these headquarters. 

The major-general commanding further directs, in consequence 
of the fact of the Floridians not responding to the call for Florida 
troops as it was expected they would do, that you discourage as 
much as possible all males from entering your lines unless they 
agree at once to take the oath of allegiance and are willing to bear 
arms. The majority of the refugees in Florida have apparently 
done us more harm than good. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, October 31, 1864. 

Brig. Gen. John P. Hatch, 

Commanding District of Florida, Jacksonville, Fla. : 
General : I have just received the report of Lieutenant-Colonel 
Marple, Thirty -fourth.U. S. Colored Troops, of the fight near Brad- 
ley's Creek on the 24th instant, which resulted in a defeat, besides 
the loss of 20 or 30 men and a large number of horses. This late 
disaster has resulted as I predicted when you established the post at 
Magnolia against my wish. I have always been opposed to the 
establishment of a post at that point, and have repeatedly so stated 
in letters to you. 

In my letter of August 10, I stated that "your plan of operating 
from Magnolia is not considered so desirable as from Baldwin." 



320 



S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. 



[Chap. XLVH. 



Again, on the 16th of the same month, I stated that "no permanent 
jjost must be established." Again, on the 19th, I wrote: "Be sure 
and not disseminate your force by dividing them among too many 
posts." On the 28th of August, in reply to your letters giving the 
particulars of the disaster at Gainesville, the letter states : 

In regard to the establishment of new posts in your district the opinion of the 
commanding general has been fully gi'^'en in former letters to you. The major- 
general commanding defers to any difference of opinion with the commanding offi- 
cer of the District of Florida, who must regard himself as responsible for any unfor- 
timate loss arising from vaiiation of orders from these headquarters. 

In consequence of this last defeat, I now desire that Magnolia be 
evacuated as soon as the supplies and material be removed, and that 
a t)ost be established on the west side of the cut cunning from the 
Saint John's River to Fernandina to guard that passage from any 
attempt of the enemy to close it. Captain Suter will be sent shortly 
to Florida to lay out a work at that place. 

Cavalry raids in Florida so far have resulted in no benefit to the 
Government. In fact, they have only resulted in furnishing the 
rebels with fine arms and horses, and encouraging the men to 
plunder and pillage and causing them to be demoralized and inefli- 
cient. In view of -this fact I have concluded to dismount the 
Seventy-fifth Ohio Regiment and return it to its original arm of the 
service as infantry. You will therefore send all the horses now 
used by the Seventy -fifth Ohio Regiment at once to Hilton Head, 
and also the surplus horses of the Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry. 
In your last tri-monthly of the 17th instant, you report the Fourth 
Massachusetts Cavalry as having an aggregate of 112 enlisted men 
and 183 serviceable horses. Every available horse is now required 
here and in the Northern District. In the latter place battery horses 
have had to be used for transportation and are now rendered almost 
useless. As no more horses are promised from the North I must 
collect all that I can, to be used by those who understand the care of 
them. I cannot have any more captured by the enemy. I shall 
expect at least 175 or 200 horses from your district. The quarter- 
master will send transportation for them at once. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

j: g. foster, 

Major-General, Commanding. 



Abstract from return of the Department of the South, Maj. Gen. John G. Foster, 
U. S. Army, comvianding, for October, 1864. 



Command. 



General headquarters 

Northern District (General Potter) 

District of Beaufort (General Saxton) . . . 
District of Hilton Bead (Colonel Brown) 
District of Florida (General Hatch) 

Total 



Present for 
duty. 



49 
148 
70 
71 
90 



428 



4,611 
1,887 
2,252 
2,262 



11,092 






131 
5,481 
2,466 
3,028 
2,969 



14,070 






6,705 
2,849 
3,853 
4,232 



17,778 



Pieces of 
artillery. 



81 



(a) 



12 

7 

II 

(o) 



a Omitted from district return. 



Chap. XLVII.] CORKESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 321 

Troops in tlie Department of fhe South, Maj. Gen. John G. Foster, 
U. S. Army, commanding, October 31, 1864. 

NORTHERN DISTRICT. 
Brig. Gen. Edward E. Potter. 

MORRIS ISLAND.* 

Col. Edward N. Hallowell. 

54th Massachusetts (colored), Lieut. Col. H. Northy Hooper. 

56th New York, Lieut. Col. Rockwell Tyler. 

52d Pennsylvania, Maj. Thomas B. Jayne. 

21st U. S. Colored Troops, Lieut. Col. Augustus G. Bennett. 

3d Rhode Island Heavy Artillery, First Battalion, Capt. John M. Barker. 

3d New York Light Artillery, Battery B, Capt. Thomas J. Mesereau. 

1st New York Engineers, Company G, / Lieut. Nathaniel M. Ed- 

1st New York Engineers, detachment Company I, ) wards. 

FOLLY island, t 
Col. EUOENE A. KOZLAY. 

55th Massachusetts (colored), Lieut. Col. Charles B. Fox. 

54th New York, Maj. Stephen Kovacs. 

38d U. S. Colored Troops, Maj. Charles T. Trowbridge. 

4th Massachusetts Cavalry (detachment), Lieut. George F. Davis. 

3d New York Light Artillery, Battery B (section), Lieut. George C. Breok. 

. DISTRICT OF BEAUFORT, t 

Brig. Gen. RuFUS Saxton. 

X27th New York, Maj. Edward H. Little. 
26th U. S. Colored Troops, Col. William Silliman. 
102d U. S. Colored Troops, Col. Henry L. Chipman. 

3d Rhode Island Heavy Artillery, Company A, Lieut. E. Augustus Waterhouse. 

2d U. S. Colored Light Artillery, Battery G, Capt. Jeremiah S. Clark. 

1st New York Engineers, Company I (detachment), Capt. George Ekiwards. 

DISTRICT OF HILTON HEAD.§ 
Col. Philip P. Brown, Jr. 

144th New York, Lieut. Col. James Lewis. 

25th Ohio (nine companies), Capt. Carrington E. Randall. 

32d U. S. Colored Troops, Col. George "W. Baird. 

1st New York Engineers, First Battalion, Capt. Vincent W. M. BrovsTi. 
U.S. Veteran Reserve Corps (detachment), Lieut. Alexander Cameron. 
157th New York,| Lieut. Col. James C. Carmichael. 

DISTRICT OF FLORIDA. 1[ 

Brig. Gen. John P. Hatch. 

17th Connecticut, Lieut. Col. Albert H. Wilcoxson. 
75th Ohio, Col. Andrew L. Harris. 
107th Ohia Capt. Edward S. Meyer. 

3d U. S. Colored Troops, Col. Benjamin C. Tilghman. 

34th U. S. Colored Troops (eight companies), Lieut. Col. William W. Marple. 
35th U. S. Colored Troops, Col. James C. Beecher. 

4th Massachusetts Cavalry, Second Battalion, Capt. Charles E.Keith. 

3d New York Light Artillery, Battery F, Lieut. Edgar H. Titus. 

* Or First Separate Brigade. • ■ § Or Third Separate Brigade. 

f Sub-post of Morris Island. || At Fort Pulaski. 

j Or Second Separate Brigade. 1[ Or Fourth Separate Brigade. 

21 R R — VOL XXXV, FT II 



322 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVU. 

Headquarters Fourth Separate Brigade, 
District oe Florida, Dept. of the South, 

Jacksonville, Fla., November 1, 1864. 

Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. District of Florida: 

Captain : I liave tlie honor to acknowledge the receipt of the 
letter of October 31 from the major-general commanding the de- 
partment. I know that the establishment of the post of Magnolia 
was, in the opinion of the general, not desirable, but he deferred to 
my judgment in the matter, holding me responsible for any disaster 
that should result from its establishment. No disaster has yet oc- 
curred which makes me doubt the judgment exercised in establisli- 
ing it. 

The loss of a portion of the Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry confirms 
me in the opinion that the establishment of that post was beneficial. 
It shows the enemy keep a large force of troops in that vicinity, who 
would otherwise be closely investing this place or making forays 
across the river from Volusia. The post will be immediately aban- 
doned as directed. 

Our main trouble has been that we have not had sufficient cavalry 
here, not that we have too much. The horses of the Seventy-fifth 
Ohio will be sent up as soon as they can be collected. The cavalry 
force left in the district consists of the remnant of the battalion of 
the Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry, 7 officers and 48 enlisted men 
for duty, 50 men sick, and some 12 Florida volunteers not yet 
mounted. 

As this force is entirely inadequate for the protection of the 
coiintry between the Saint John's and the sea-coast, we may ex- 
pect forays to be constantly made by the enemy into the counties of 
Volusia and Saint John's. The close investment of Jacksonville, 
similar to the condition of affairs when General Gordon was in com- 
mand, can be confidently looked for as soon as the enemy learn that 
Magnolia is abandoned and the cavalry gone. 

I inclose with this a report of the operations of a small detach- 
ment of cavalry sent to collect cattle for the post of Fort Clinch. 
Very respectfullv, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Special Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department of the South, 

No. 378. ) Hilton Head, S. C, November 1, 1864. 

******* 

V. Brig. Gen. E. P. Scammon, U. S. Volunteers, is hereby 
assigned to the command of the Hilton Head, &c. , District, and will 
relieve Col. P. P. Brown, jr.. One hundred and fifty-seventh New 
York Volunteers, without delay. Colonel Brown on being relieved 
wfll proceed to Port Pulaski, Ga., and resume command of his regi- 
ment. 

* * * * * * * ■ 

By command of Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster : 

W. L. M. BURGER, 

Captain and Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Chap. XLVII.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 323 

Headquarters First Separate Brigade, 
Northern District, Dept. op the South, 

Morris Island, S. C, November 2, 1864. 
Col. E. N. Hallowell, 

Commanding Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Volunteers: 
Colonel : The brigadier-general commanding desires me, in the 
name of the major-general commanding the department, to tender 
you his sincere thanks for the prompt and efficient manner in which 
yon and all the officers and men of your command discharged their 
duties while guarding the rebel prisoners of war. Your close ob- 
servance of order and vigilance have attracted the attention of the 
major-general commanding. This letter will be read to your com- 
mand at dress parade. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

THOS. J. ROBINSON, 
First Lieutenant, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters District of West Florida, 

Barrancas, November 4, 1864. 

Lieut. Col. C. T. Christensbn, 

Assf. Adjt. Gen., Military Division of West Mississippi: 

Colonel : I have the honor to report the following statement of 
movements of the enemy in my vicinity, which I consider perfectly 
reliable, dated November 2, 1864 : 

Six companies of the Fifteenth Confederate Cavalry have gone in 
the direction of Milton, Fla. A portion of Forrest's and Maury's 
command are at Pollard. There are three regiments of infantry at 
Blakely ; " destination not known," supposed to be Pollard or Mil- 
ton. One cavalry regiment from Mobile was ordered to report at 
Greenwood's plantation yesterday. The number of men in these 
regiments is not known. The entire force at Greenwood's is 1,000 
men and four pieces of artillery, but there is some talk of their 
moving above Blakeljr for fear they may be cut off by forces from 
Pensacola, and there is one company of men (100 strong) at Mont- 
rose. There is one set of pickets at Stick River and one at Hol- 
man's, on the Perdido River. At Mobile there are about 8,000 old 
men and boys. Two couriers are stationed at H. I. Helton's, while 
he acts as a spy for them. At Blakely there is situated one battery, 
mounting eight guns — two large and six small ones. Colonel 
Maury's movements seem to be rather mysterious. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. BAILEY, 
Brevet Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



General Orders, ) Hdqrs. Department of the South, 

No. 152. J Hilton Head, S. C, November 5, 1864. 

I. Brig. Gen. John P. Hatch,-U. S. Volunteers, is hereby relieved 
from the command of the District of Florida and ordered to take 
command of the Northern District, relieving Brig. Gen. E. E. Pot- 
ter, U. S. Volunteers. 



324 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. (Chap. XLVU. 

II. Brig. Gen. E. P. ScammoiL, U. S. Volunteers, is relieved from 
the command of the Hilton Head District and will take command of 
the District of Florida. 

III. Brigadier-General Potter, on being relieved by Brigadier- 
General Hatch, will assume command of the Hilton Head District. 

IV. Capt. E. S. Jewett, acting assistant inspector-general of the 
Hilton Head District, will discharge the duties of the acting assist- 
ant inspector-general of the department during the temporary ab- 
sence of Captain Gouraud. 

By command of Mai. Gen. J. G. Foster : 

W. L. M. BURGER, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, November 5, 18C4. 

Brig. Gen. John P. Hatch, 

Comdg. District of Florida, Jacksonville, Fla. : 
General : I have received your letter of the .1st, expressing the 
opinion that the changes directed in my letter of the 31st ultimo 
will be injurious to the service, and also stating that you desire to 
be relieved from your duty, the policy of which you cannot approve. 
I do not see the probability of the predictions which you make as 
to the consequence of the changes directed. The cavalry force thus 
far has met with constant losses. By dismounting a regiment the 
regiment is not taken from the command, but remains to be of more 
effect, perhaps, if the legs of the men be used instead of those of 
horses. The post of Magnolia was a positive weakness, causing a 
dissemination of force on a relatively weak point which the enemy 
could take by a determined attack. Moreover, in such an event, 
cavalry could avail nothing in the defense of either Magnolia, Jack- 
sonville, or Yellow Bluff. It has been repulsed in nearly every en- 
gagement with the present force of the enemy in Florida, and we 
cannot reasonably expect better results with an increased force of 
the enemy, sufficient to attack our fortified positions. Furthermore, 
the military position at Magnolia was very faulty, both as resi)ects 
the location of the fort and the character of the river bank at that 
point ; the site, being flat and covered within musket range of the 
fort with woods, would enable the enemy to approach under cover 
and unobserved. The bend of the river shore presents two promi- 
nent points, above and below the landing-place, from which batteries 
erected by the enemy may drive off the gun-boats and keep the gar- 
rison in a state of siege until it surrenders. This work will in no 
way increase the security of Jacksonville, for in a determined attack • 
on that place the enemy woxxld either capture or isolate Magnolia. 

With respect to the other point, viz, the exposure of the country 
east of the Saint John's, I do not anticipate the result you predict. 
With the same force on foot I think more efficient action may be 
expected against any force of the enemy that may cross the river 
than from the same force mounted, for this reason, that the force of 
the enemy which crosses tlie river will probably be on foot, espe- 
cially if it be in force. If our soldiers are taught to undertake long 
marches they will accomplish far more in the swamps east of the 
river than will a moimted force. A certain number of mounted 



Chap. XLVU] COKRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 325 

men is always necessary for vedettes and scouts, but a mounted force 
larger than is necessary for this purpose, but still too small to do 
effective fighting, had better be reduced to the eifective limits for 
sco\xts, &c., and reliance for fighting be placed entirely upon the in- 
fantry. This is more especially necessary when, as at present, the 
orders are to stand strictly on the defensive. Besides the above, it 
is necessary to prepare to defend the inland passage from the Saint 
John's River to Fernandina in anticipation of the opening of that 
port. 

With the occupation of Magnolia in anything like sufficient 
strength your force, after garrisoning the really necessary points, 
will not be sufiicient for this new work. As to the interest you 
properly take in the prosperity of the people of Florida, I must say 
that, although one of the necessary things to be considered by a 
commanding officer, .still it is not the most important, and must not, 
in fact, be allowed to take precedence of the military interests of 
your command. The estimation of the importance of considera- 
tions relating to the extent of country to be protected is really 
very much lessened by the fact that, after all the urgent appeals 
that have been made to them, only a very small number of the in- 
habitants of your district have come forward to take up arms and 
fight for us. Military reasons, therefore, should govern the dispo- 
sition of troops. 

With regard to what you say of your intention to be relieved from 
duty in the department, I must say that I should be sorry to have 
you do so. I highly appreciate and esteem your qualities as a sol- 
dier and a gentleman, and as an officer of lengthened and distin- 
guished service. If, however, you really desire to serve in another 
part of the country, it will not be necessary to use outside influence; 
but if you address a letter to that effect to the General-in-Chief, and 
send it througli this office, I shall be happy to forward it with an in- 
dorsement which I can truly make in testimony of the many excel- 
lent qualities possessed by you. Observing, however, from yoxiT 
letter that you found this desire upon your objection to the policy 
of my orders, the responsibility for the effect of which you are 
not willing to bear, I propose at once to order General Scammon to 
relieve yo\i, and to assign you to the command of the Northern 
District. 

This change is rendered necessary by the state of General Scam- 
mon's health, with reference to which all the surgeons earnestly 
recommend a transfer to Florida, and the necessity of having an 
officer of experience and great military knowledge in command of 
the Nprtiaern District, -v^l^icii is really the mqst important in the de- 
partment. At the tiiife General Scammoi} arrived, I felt the heces: 
sity of calling you from Florida to talie that command, fearing that 
General Scammon's health would not be sufficient for the hard labor 
and exposure. Feeling, however, a great reluctance to take you 
from the command in Florida in which you took such interest, 
and as General Scammon was willing to undertake the trial, I or- 
dered him to that command. Now that his health has proven inad- 
equate to that exposure and labor, I am compelled to make this 
change. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Covimanding. 



326 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Cbap-XLVU. 

Flag-Steamer Philadelphia, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C, November 9, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. J. G. Foster, U. S. Army, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Hdqrs. Hilton Head : 
General : I have received yours of the 7th instant, requesting 
that Captain Stone be instructed to remove the chain cable that is 
now across the Savannah River, in order to avoid the time and 
trouble of transferring the sick and wounded soldiers who are ex- 
pected from the North, &c. I shall send an order to Captain Stone 
to that effect. At the same time, I wish to draw your attention to 
the advisableness of doing nothing that, by inference or otherwise, 
can enlighten the rebels as to the nature of the obstructions that 
remain there, or the facility with which they maybe passed, because 
it is with difficulty that 1 am able to blockade the different entrances 
along the coast, and the force at Savannah River would be quite 
insufficient without the obstructions, which may be much less real 
than supposed. I should have recommended the iise of the Wilming- 
ton River and Saint Augustine Creek for the purpose of exchange, 
which are quite as convenient for access by water to Savannah. 
There the blockade is made strong by an iron-clad, and will bear 
any notice which the rebels might have an opportunity of bestow- 
ing. The steamers could meet at Wilmington Island. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



U. S. Flag-Steamer Philadelphia, 

November 9, 1864. 
Major-General Foster, 

Commanding Department of the South : 
General : Mr. Ward was a resident of Kingstree, on the North- 
east Railroad, S. C, where he owned considerable property. Says 
lie was always a Union man, and fled now in order to avoid the con- 
scription. He took the oath of allegiance, and represents that the 
country between Santee and Pedee contributed large supplies to the 
rebel army ; that a siiitable force could easily occupy and hold the 
ground between the rivers ; that he knows all the roads and coun- 
try perfectly, and was willing to act as a guide. Thinking that this 
knowledge could be turned to account, and that he could best tell 
his own tale, I concluded to send him to the Navy Department. The 
chief value was his own reliability, if it was deemed serviceable. 
These were the principal facts wliich he had to communicate. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear-Admiral. 

[Indorsement.] 

Headquarters Department op the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, November 13, 1864. 
Respectfully referred to Capt. C. R. Suter, chief engineer. Depart- 
ment of the South, for his information and file in his office. 
By command of Maj. Gen; J. G. Foster : 

W. B. DEAN, 
Lieut., 127th Netv York Volunteers, A. A. A. G. 



Chap. XLVIL] COBRESPONDENCE, ETC. UNION. 327 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, November 10, 1864. 
Lieut. Gen. W. J. Hardee, 

Comdg. Confederate Forces, S. C, Ga., and Fla. : 
General : I have the honoi* to acknowledge the receipt of your 
favor of the 7th instant,* in which ji-ou state that my proposition in 
my letter of the 3d instant "meets with my (your) approval." 
Without wishing to be considered hypercritical, I deem it proper to 
bring to your notice that such expressions are ordinarily used by 
superiors in reference to acts or propositions of an inferior officer, 
and are objectionable in commiiuications between officers of equal 
command. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, November 12; 1864. 

Lieut. Gen. W. J. Hardee, 

Comdg. Confederate Forces, S. C. , Ga. , and Fla. : 
General: In reply to- your letter of October 13, proposing an 
exchange of the prisoners of war in our several departments, I have 
the honor to inform you that I have received information from 
Washington that no exchanges will be made (except on the field of 
battle, as provided in the cartel) without special authority therefor 
from tlie War Department. 

I have the honor to remain, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters First Separate Brigade, 
Northern District, Dept. of the South, 

Morris Island, S. C, November 12, 1864. 

Capt. W. L. M. Burger, 

Assistant Adjutant- General, Department of the South: 
Sir : I have the honor to forward, for the information of the 

major-general commanding, the following extracts from morning 

rejjorts received this day at these headquarters : 
Captain Nutt, Fifty-fifth Massachusetts, commanding at Long 

Island, reports ; 

The cars were running in and out of Charleston constantly during the night. 
Several musket shots were heard in the direction of Secessionville. 

Captain Pope, Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Volunteers, command- 
ing at Black Island, reports : 

The bells in Charleston vere ringing for nearly an hour in the first part of the 
night. About 9, considerable musketry firing took place at the upper end of- James 
Island, -within the enemy's lines. 

* Not found. 



328 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVH. 

These reports, coming from different sources, would seem to show 
that there was considerable commotion last night within the enemy's 
lines, to what cause to be attributed I cannot say. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

EDWARD E. POTTER, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Washington, November 13, 1864. 
Major-General Foster, 

Hilton Head, 8. C. : 
General : Major-General Sherman expects to leave Atlanta on 
the 16thjnstant for the interior of Georgia or Alabama, as circum- 
stances may seem to require, and may come out either on the Atlantic 
coast or the Gulf. If the former, it will probably be at Savannah, 
Ossabaw Sound, Darien, or Fernandina. Supplies are being col- 
lected at Hilton Head, with transports to convey them to the point 
required. Supplies are also collected at Pensacola Bay, to be trans- 
ported to any point he may require on the Gulf. Should Sherman 
come to the Atlantic coast, which I think most probable, he expects 
to reach there the early part of December, and wishes you, if possi- 
ble, to cut the Charleston and Savannah Railroad near Pocotaligo 
about that time. At all events a demonstration on that road will 
be of advantage. Y6u will be able undoubtedly to learn his move- 
ments through rebel sources much earlier than from these head- 
quarters, and will shape your action accordingly. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. W. HALLECK, 
Major-General, Chief of Staff. 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, Noveniber 13, 1864. 
Lieut. Gen. W. J. Hardee, 

Comdg. Confederate Forces, S. C, Ga., and Fla. : 
General : I have the honor to inform you that I have received 
instructions from Washington prohibiting for the present the trans- 
mittal across the lines of money or other supplies to prisoners of 
war. It is understood that General Grant and General Lee have 
made such arrangements for the supplies of prisoners of war on 
both sides as will shortly be put in operation for the benefit of botli 
parties. 
I have the honor to remain, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General. Commanding. ■ 



Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, November 14, 1864. 
Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, U. S. Army : 

General : I have the honor to inclose to you a Savannah paper 
of the 12th instant, brought in by the flag-of-truce boat. The 
exchange is progressing favorably, I believe, under Colonel Mul- 



Chap. XLVII.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — CONFEDERATE. 329 



ford's direction. Reports from Morris Island represent that there 
are appearances of commotion among the rebels in Charleston and 
on James Island. I shall go up there to-night to see what is the 
matter. I hope and trust that it may be caused by the approach of 
General Sherman in the rear. Such a movement would be the finest 
of the war, and would capture Charleston and Savannah with all 
their stores of cannon, ammunition, and material, and open bases 
of supplies from which with his army he could utterly destroy and 
devastate the whole State of South Carolina. The health of the 
department is good, and with the precautions taken, and the late- 
ness of the season, I apprehend no cases of yellow fever, even with 
the intercourse by flags of truce. Eight officers of the U. S. Army, 
escaped prisoners from Columbia, arrived here to-day. 
Very respectfuHv, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major-General, Commanding. 



Charleston, S. C, March 1, 1864. 
General Samuel Cooper, 

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Ya. : 
General Beauregard left the 38th ultimo for Florida. General 
Gardner, in command there, reports that General Gillmore is now 
in chief command ; that he is being re-enforced ; has retired to 
Jacksonville, which he is fortifying, but appearances all indicate 
another attempt to advance in heavier force soon. Large number 
of transports reported at Saint John's Bar with troops. We reoc- 
cupy Baldwin. 

THOMAS JORDAN, 

Chief of Staff. 



Charleston, S. C, March 2, 1864. 

(Received 10.40.) 
General Samuel Cooper, 

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va. : 
All the movements of the enemy on this front indicate that he is 
Bending re-enforcements hence to Florida, No late news from our 
forces there. 

THOMAS JORDAN, 

Chief of Staff. 



Royall's House, March 2, 1864. 

Brigadier-General Jordan, 

Chief of Staff: 
I have the honor to inform you that Captain Behr^ post commis- 
sary, reports the failure of the meat issue for to-day, and probable 
failure of it on to-morrow, as Major Molloy, commissary of sub- 
sistence in Charleston, informs"ine that he has none on hand. 

JOHNSON HAGOOD, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



330 S. C., FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVU. 

Hdqes. Fourth Mil. Dist. of South Carolina, 

Georgetown, March 2, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. Thomas Jordan, 

Chief of Staff, &c., Charleston, S. C. : 
General : The enemy yesterday landed a party of 20 or 30 men 
at a point a few miles below Battery White, drove in the pickets 
posted there, and remained about a half hour. The party then re- 
turned to their gun-boat, which proceeded down the bay again to 
her anchorage. Their object may have been merely to ascertain 
whether or not any batteries were in process of construction there, 
and, again, it may have been to make a reconnaissance, with a view 
to ulterior operations. I have deemed it my duty to* report the cir- 
cumstance to department headquarters. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. H. TRAPIER, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



Charleston, S. C, March 3, 1864. 

General G. T. Beauregard, 

Commanding, &c., Baldwin, Fla. : 

Movements of troops still seen toward the south from the islands 
in this vicinity. Scouts report arrival of some negro regiments from 
New Berne at Hilton Head. Private information from Nassau 
states that the enemy is planting large number of mortars on Morris 
Island with which to open fire on Sullivan's Island, under cover of 
which to attempt passage into harbor with iron-clads. 

THOMAS JORDAN, 

Chief of Staff. 



Hdqrs. Deft, of S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 

Charleston, S. C, March 3, 1864. 
Capt. W. J. Gayer, 

Provost-Marshal, Charleston : 

Captain : I am directed by the commanding general to desire you 
to forward to these headquarters a descriptive list of the negro pris- 
oners that j'ou have handed over to the State authorities since the 
1st of January, 1864, with a statement, if possible, setting forth the 
mode and time of capture, with the names and residences of the 
negroes. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. W. FEILDEN, 
Captain and Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Charleston, March 4, 18G4. 

(Received 8.30.) • 
General S. Cooper : 

Enemy has retired under cover of gun-boats to Jacksonville, where 
he is fortifying. Force estimated at 12,000, with re-enforcements 



CSAp. XLVll.l ConRfiSPONDENCE, ETC. COTfFEDEBATE. 331 

arriving from New Berne, it is said. Troops are being sent evidently 
hence to some point. Our troops occupy position in rear of McGirt's 
Creek. Our total loss in battle at Ocean Pond reported 800 ; that of 
enemy at least 2,000 killed, wounded, and prisoners. Our troops 
fought with great gallantry against twice their number in the open 
woods. 

THOMAS JORDAN, 

Chief of Staff. 



Headquarters in the Field, 

Near Baldwin, Fla., March 4, 18G4. 

Whereas by representation made to these headquarters it appears 
that in the district of the country south of the Withlacoochee River 
on the west, and of the headwaters of the Saint John's River on the 
east, embraced in the fourth and fifth commissary districts of Flor- 
ida, there are a number of persons, deserters from the Army of the 
Confederate States and others, liable to military service, who evade, 
by concealment and sometimes by open resistance to the constituted 
military authorities, the duty which they owe to their country; and 
it has further been represented that many of these persons have 
families so entirely dependent upon them for a support that much 
suffering might result by compelling them at present to military 
service in localities remote from their homes, and that many are 
willing to do such service to the Confederacy as they may and remain 
in proximity to their families : 

By reason of these representations a general amnesty and pardon 
is hereby proclaimed to all such persons in said districts, excepting 
only those who have, in conjunction with the enemy; taken up arms 
against the Confederate States, or taken the life of any citizen or 
officer or soldier of the Confederate States ; on condition, however, 
that within forty days after the publication of this proclamation 
those in the fourth commissary district shall report to Maj. A. G. 
Summer, commissary of subsistence and commissary for that dis- 
trict, and those in the fifth district to Capt. James McKay, com- 
missary agent for the fifth district of Florida, and upon condition 
further that all surplus beef-cattle owned by such persons shall be 
furnished the Confederate Government at schedule prices. Those 
resident of said districts who report within the time prescribed will 
be employed by the said Maj. A. G. Summer, Capt. James McKay, 
commissary agent, as detailed men, in gathering cattle, fishing, &c. , 
for the Government, for which they will receive the compensation 
allowed by law to detailed men. 

Such as do not belong to any organization will be allowed, until 
further orders, to join companies for local defense, from which they 
will be detailed, if they so elect, for service with the said commissary 
and commissary agent. 

To all who refuse, or fail without satisfactory reason therefor, to 
avail themselves of this proclamation it is announced that the com- 
manding general will at an early day visit upon them the most con- 
dign pimishment by the adoption of such measures as will effect- 
iially rid the country of their presence. 

G. T. BEAUREGARD, 

General, Commanding. 



332 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

Royall's House, March 5, 1864. 
Brigadier-General Jordan, 

Chief of Staff: 
Colonel Simonton reports no change of importance on the front. 
Taking advantage of the clearness of the atmosphere to-day I care- 
fully examined the outworks of the enemy. They have nearly com- 
pleted a battery on Horse Island at the foot of the bridge from Bat- 
tery Island. Their causeway between Dixon's and Horse Islands is 
finished. The battery on this end of Dixon's Island is nearly fin- 
ished. The causeway leading from this battery to Dixon's Arm is 
about half done. It is a broad, substantial road. They either are 
about to build another battery on the end of Dixon's Arm adjoining 
Schooner Creek or they have a pretty strong picket at that point. 
They have two batteries guarding the bridge and causeway from 
Dixon's Arm to Long Island, one on each island. 

JOHNSON HAGOOD, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters in the Field, 
McGirVs Creek, Fla., March 5, 1864—2.30 p. m. 

Brig. Gen. H. W. Mercer, 

Commanding at Savannah, Ga. : 
Send Twelfth Georgia Battalion to Tallahassee without delay. 
Make whatever dispositions may be necessary to replace temporarily 
that battalion. 

G. T. BEAUREGARD. 



General Orders, ) [Hdqrs. Dept. op S. C, Ga., and Fla., 

No. — . I March 5, 1864.] 

I. The temporary division heretofore commanded by Brigadier- 
General Taliaferro will cease from this date and the commanding 
officers of the brigades composing this division will hereafter re- 
port directly to the general commanding the forces in the field. 

II. When Brigadier-General Gardner shall have been relieved of 
the command of the forces in the field he will return, according to his 
i-eqiaest, made on account of his physical condition, to the commauji 
of liis sub-district, To this will ' bp added a gen^ral supiervisi(:)n o^ 
all the transportation and supplies of this districj; ]inder instfuptiong 
from Major-General Anderson. 

By command of General Beauregard : 

HENRY BRYAN, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Special Orders, ) Hdqrs. Dept. S. C, Ga., and Fla., 

No. — . ^ Inthefield,McGirt's Creek, Fla., March 5,1864. 

I. The Twenty -sixth Virginia Regiment, now in the brigade com- 
manded by Brig. Gen. Joseph Finegan, is hereby transferred from 
said bi'igade to that commanded by Col. George P. Harrison, jr. 



Chap. XLVn.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — CONFEDERATE. 333 

II. The Fifty-ninth Virginia Regiment, now in the brigade com- 
manded by Col. George P. Harrison, jr., is hereby transferred from 
said brigade to that commanded by Brig. Gen. Joseph Finegan. 

III. The First Georgia Regulars, now in the brigade commanded 
by Brig. Gen. Joseph Finegan, is hereby transferred from said bri- 
gade to that commanded by Brig. Gen. A. H. Colquitt. 

IV. Capt. J. J. Dickison, of the Second Florida Cavalry, will pro- 
ceed at once with his company toPalatka, Fla., and take post there 
as heretofore. He Avill call upon the commanding officer of the 
Fourth Georgia Cavalry for such support as may be necessary. 

V. The commanding officer of the Fourth Georgia Cavalry will 
furnish Capt. J. J. Dickison with such assistance as he may require 
for the post of Palatka, and hold himself in readiness tosupport 
Captain Dickison with his whole command if found necessary. 

VI. Brigadier-General Gardner will re-establish the military posts 
from Clay Landing on the Suwannee River to Tampa, garrisoning 

■ these posts with the troops heretofore occupying them under the or- 
ders of Brigadier-General Finegan. 
By command of General Beauregard : 

HENRY BRYAN, 
Major and Assistant Adjutant- General. 



March 6, 18G4. 
Maj. H. C. GuERiN, 

Com. of Suh., State of South Carolina: 
Major : By direction of the commanding general I have the lionol 
to inform you that the following commands have been transferred 
from the several districts named in the State of South Carolina to 
Florida, viz : 

First Military District, Eighteenth South Carolina Volunteers and 
Holcombe Legion. 

Second Military District, Fifth Regiment Georgia Cavalry and 
Villepigue's battery. 

Third Military District, Thirty-second Regiment Georgia Volun- 
teers. 

Sixth Military District, Twenty-sixth and Fifty-ninth Virginia 
Volunteers. 

Seventh Military District, Sixth, Nineteenth, Twenty-third, 
Twenty-seventh, and Twenty-eighth Georgia Volunteers (Colquitt's 
brigade). Eleventh South Carolina Volunteers, Wheaton's battery 
light artillery, and one company South Carolina Siege Train. 

I am further instructed to say it is not probable that the present 
force in this State will soon be augmented. 
Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. M. OTEY, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Camp at McGirt's Creek, Fla., 

March 6, 1864—6 a. m. 
General S. Cooper, Richmond, Va. : . 

My estimate of enemy's forces at Jacksonville is less than that of 
several generals here, and the same as that of the rest. Those forces 
came from South Carolina and North Carolina. He cannot be driven 
out of Jacksonville with our present means. 



334 S. C, FLA., AWD ON THE GA. CQAST. IChap. XLVII. 

Had the gap between Lawton and Live Oak been filled by a line 
of railroad connecting those two points, as urged by me more than 
a year ago, the re-enforcements I was sending at the very moment I 
was being asked to send 10,000 men to General Johnston would have 
arrived in time to co-operate in the action at Ocean Pond, and the 
enemy would at once have been driven out of Florida. But as it 
was, two entire days were lost in the passage through the gap of a 
portion of the re-enforcements, and we had to fight the enemy one 
to two. Our victory, it is true, was complete, but as we were not in 
sufiicient force of good troojjs to pursue the enemy vigorously, he 
had time to fall back on Jacksonville, where he has been at work 
ever since, extending his intrenchments, and, with the assistance of 
his gun-boats, rendering the place inaccessible to such forces as we 
can dispose of. If, however, the Department be of opinion that 
under such circumstances, and with the means at hand, another 
officer can expel the enemy from Florida by prompt and decided 
measures, I will be most happy to surrender the command to him. 

G. T. BEAUREGARD. 

[First indorsement.] 

March 21, 1864. 
Respectfully referred to General Bragg. 

S. COOPER, 
Adjutant and Insjiector General. 

[Second indorsement.] 

March 33, 1864. 
No action seems to be called for by the public interests. 

BRAXTON BRAGG. 

[Inclosure No. 1.] 

Camp Gardner, March 5, 1864. 
Maj. Henry Bryan, Assistant Adjutant-General : 

Major : Not having been present at the time the enemy made his 
advance on Lake City, and only having arrived here after he had 
taken shelter under his gun-boats and behind his works at Jackson- 
ville, I have had no other means of estimating his forces than those 
upon which the general officers present have based their estimates. 
As their opinions of his numbers so nearly concur, I have no reason 
to doubt the correctness of their estimates. 

On the point of expelling the enemy from Florida, it can now be 
done only by seizing favorable points on the Saint John's below 
Jacksonville, and so fortifying them as to prevent the force at Jack- 
sonville from being re-enforced and supplied, or by carrying the 
works at that place by assault. Either method involves difficultiea^' 
readily appreciated; the latter, perhaps, under the circumstances, 
being the more feasible of the two. The spirit of our troops and 
the demoralization of those" of the enemy, growing out of his late 
defeat at Ocean Pond, would, in my opinion, enable us to carry the 
works around Jacksonville by storm. Of course it would be at 
great sacrifice of life, and to no purpose, since his gun-boats would 
prevent us from holding it. 

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

PATTON ANDERSON, 

Ilajor- General. 



Chap. XLVU] CORRKSPONDENCE, ETC. CONFEDERATE. 335 

[Inclosure No. 3.] 

Headquarters Brigade, 

March 5, 1864. 
General G. T. Beauregard, 

Comdg. Dept. of S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida : 

General : In reply to your inquiry as to my opinion of the 
strengtli of the enemy and the propriety of attacking him in his de- 
fenses at Jacksonville, I have the honor to say that in the recent 
battle of Ocean Pond his forces were not less than 8,000 or 10,000. 

The following regiments were ascertained to have been upon the 
field : White regiments of infantry. Forty-seventh, Forty-eighth, 
and One hundred and fifteenth New York, Sixth and Seventh Con- 
necticut, First and Twelfth Massachusetts, and Seventh New Hamp- 
sliire. Black regiments of infantry. Sixth and Eighth Pennsylva- 
nia and Fifty-fourth Massachusetts, one battalion of cavalry, and 
Fortieth Massachusetts Mounted Infantry. Artillery, Batteries B 
and M, and Hamilton's battery of regulars. 

From nearly all of these commands prisoners were taken, and letters 
found upon the field gave specifically the denomination of the forces 
which constituted the expedition. The negro regiments were full, 
numbering 1,000 men or more, and from the best information I could 
get the white regiments averaged 700. To what extent the enemy 
lias been re-enforced since his I'etreat to Jacksonville I can only form 
an opinion. The facts and circumstances relating thereto have been 
communicated to me only in casual conversation with superior ofiB- 
cers. There seems to be no doubt that re-enforcements have arrived. 
I do not think it safe to calculate the present strength of the enemy 
at less than 12,000 effective men. I have no hesitation in saying that 
an assault upon the fortified position of the enemy with our present 
forces would be attended with disastrous consequences. If it should 
prove successful the cost would be greater than the advantage 
gained. 

Very respectfully, 

A. H. COLQUITT, 

Brigadier- General. 

[Inclosure No. 3.] 

Headquarters Finegan's Brigade, 

In the Field, March 5, 1864. 
Maj. Henry Bryan, 

Assistant Adjutant-General : 

Major : In reply to questions submitted to me from your office in 
reference to my opinion of the enemy's force, I have the honor to say 
that, judging from the number of troops we met in action at Ocean 
Pond, and the number of re-enforcements said to have been received 
(according to the most reliable information), I do not think there can 
be less than 10,000 or 12,000 troops in Jacksonville, at the lowest es- 
timate, at this time. Flanked as Jacksonville is by two creeks, and 
with their gun-boats in their rear, and being fortified in front, as 
they doubtless are, it seems to me entirely impracticable to take the 
place by assault without a very great loss to us, even if taken at 
all. 

The estimate above given of the strength of the enemy has been 
gathered from various sources, such as prisoners, citizens from town. 



336 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA, COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

&c., and I think cannot be far from cori-ect, and does not include the 
number lost by them in the late engagement, which cannot be less 
than 2,500. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOSEPH FINEGAN, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding Brigade. 

[Inclosure No. 4.] 

Hdqrs. Harrison's Brig., Army of East Fla., 

In the Field, March 5, 1864. 
Maj. Henry Bryan, 

Assistant Adjidant-General : 

Major : By request of Captain Chisolm, aide-de-camp, I have the 
honor to make the following report relative to the strength of the 
enemy in our front : 

My estimate of his force in the action near Ocean Pond is be- 
tween 8,000 and 10,000. This opinion is based oh my observations 
on the battle-field, and coincides with the statements (making due 
allowance for exaggeration) of jjrisoners and loyal citizens at that 
time within the enemy's lines. From the best information gath- 
ered from scouts, prisoners, and citizens recently from Jacksonville, 
I am satisfied he has received such re-enforcements as, added to those 
engaged at Ocean Pond and the force left to protect communication 
with his base, would make his number at present reach nearly, if 
not quite, 14,000 of all arms. From the same source I learn that 
the enemy has been actively employed fortifying the land approach 
to Jacksonville for a sufiicient length of time to have rendered the 
position of such formidable strength that an assault with our 
present force would be, in my opinion, not only extremely hazard- 
ous, but decidedly inexpedient. 

Respectfully submitted. 

GEO. P. HARRISON, Jr., 

Colonel, Commaiiding. 

[Inclosure No. 5.] 

Headquarters Forces in Florida, 

In the Field, March 5, 1864. 

General G. T. Beauregard, 

Commanding Department : 

General : In reply to the request, made through your aide-de- 
camp, that I would communicate all information in my possession 
and also my opinion as to the forces of the enemy, I have the 
honor to say that, from the best information which I have been able 
to gather, the enemy had in the fight at Ocean Pond not less than 9,000" 
men. I presumed that not less than 2,000 were retained in rear at 
Jacksonville to guard his lines of communication, and that since 
that date he has received not less than 5,000 in re-enforcements. 
I estimate the forces now in and around Jacksonville at not less than 
12,000 ; probably from that number to 15,000. We have satisfac- 
tory information that the enemy has intrenched himself strongly 
within his lines around Jacksonville, supported by his gun-boats. 
I do not believe with our present force that the place can be suc- 
cessfully carried by assault. 



Chap. XLVn.] COKKESPONDENCE, ETC. CONFEDEKATE. 337 

I will add that among the captured negroes there have been rec- 
ognized by intelligent and reliable gentlemen negroes known to 
have been the property of friends in North Carolina, and who are 
reported to belong to a North Carolina regiment now upon this 
coast. Also, many of the ammunition boxes found upon the field 
were marked " New Berne, N. C." 

I append a list of regiments so far as ascertained from reports of 
scouts and examination of citizens and prisoners. 

Very respectfully, general, your obedient servant, 

W. M. GARDNER, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 

List of forces of enemy in and around Jacksonville. 

Cavalry : Fortieth Regiment Massachusetts Mounted Infantry, 
First Battalion Massachusetts Cavalry. 

Infantry : Six negro regiments — First, Second, and Third South 
Carolina, a North Carolina regiment, the Eighth U. S. Colored 
Regiment, and others not known by name ; One hundred and 
fifteenth, Forty-seventh, and Forty-eighth New York Volunteers 
(white), First and Twelfth Massachusetts Volunteers (white). Sixth 
and Seventh Connecticut Volunteers (white), Seventh New Hamp- 
shire Volunteers (white). 

Making two commands of cavalry and fourteen regiments in- 
fantry, white and black, and four batteries artillery, twenty-four 
pieces. The names of other regiments we have not been able to 
ascertain. 

Very respectfully submitted. 

. W. M. GARDNER, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 

[Inclosure No. 6.] 

Camp near McGirt's Creek, Fla., 

March 5, 1864. 
Captain Chisolm, 

Assistant Adjutant- General : 

Captain : I have the honor to state that from the best evidence I 
could procure the force of tlie enemy at the battle of Ocean Pond, 
and that left to protect his rear, was <it least 11,000 men. This 
estimate is based, first, upon the declaration of the enemy's coi- 
resjjondents from Hilton Head, which show that 11,000 troops em- 
barked at that point for Jacksonville ; second, from the declara- 
tions of intelligent citizens of Jacksonville, to the effect that in 
addition to those arriving from Hilton Head, a regiment has been 
transferred from Saint Augustine and troops from Fernandina to 
Jacksonville ; third, upon the statements of our officers and men 
of the number engaged at Ocean Pond, and, fourth, upon the state- 
ments of prisoners taken in that battle. 

This force has been reduced, in my opinion, by the casualties of 
the action of Ocean Pond to 8,500 or 9,000 men, and has been re- 
enforced since that action, from information derived from intelli- 
gent citizens, by between 4,000 or 5,000 men, leaving over 13,000 
men now in Jacksonville. The citizens of the country who ha ve had 
access to the town generally state that the enemy's re-enforcements 
have reached 10,000 men, and that they claim to have now 20,000, 
22 R R— VOL XXXV. PT II 



338 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVU. 

but as they give tlie number of brigades (three) which have arrived 
since the fight, and the number (two) and names of the general 
officers, I 'believe between 4,000 and 5,000 would cover the re- 
enforcements. 

Second. I was informed by negro prisoners captured that they 
were from New Berne, N. C. , and all the ammunition boxes which 
I saw were marked "New Berne," leaving no doubt in my mind 
but that part of the force at Ocean Pond was from New Berne. 

Third. I am of opinion that the enemy is too strong and too 
strongly intrenched at this time to be successfully attacked at Jack- 
sonville. He has certainly many more troops than we have. He 
has for ten days past directed all his energies to fortifying the neck 
by which that point is approached, and mounting guns, of which 
material the navy furnishes all that are needed. His gun-boats 
occupy positions which enfilade the approaches. There is no cover 
to conceal or protect an advance, and timber felled for abatis would 
offer serious resistance. 

I have the honor to be, captain, very respectfully, your obedient 

WM. B. TALIAFEREO, 

Brigadier- General. 

[Incloeure No. 7.] 

Hdqks. Forces in the Field, Army of Florida, 

MarcJi 6, 1864. 
General G. T. Beauregard, 

Commanding Departvient: 
General : I have the honor to state, as the result of the best in- 
formation I have been able to obtain from all sources, that the 
enemy's land forces in and around Jacksonville are not less than 
12,000 men of all arms ; and the probability is that they exceed this 
number. This force is supported bj"^ not less than four gun-boats. 
The position of Jacksonville is a very strong one naturally, as in- 
dicated by map and by statements of persons familiar with the 
locality. These advantages, as we are informed and believe, have 
been strengthened materially by artificial works around and in front 
of the town. To do this they have employed several thousand 
negro troops. Against such works, defended by such odds, with 
the aid of their gun-boats, which command the approaches to their 
works, I am of the opinion that it would not be prudent, with the 
forces and means at your disposal at this time, to attempt to dis- 
lodge him. 

I am, very respectfully, 

D. B. HARRIS, 
Colonel and Chief Engineer of Department. ^ 

[Inclosure No. 8.] 

TAst of regiments composing General Seymour's command at battle 
of Ocean Pond, as represented by prisoners. 

Forty-eighth New York. 

One hundred and fifteenth New York. 

Forty-seventh New York-.' 

Fifty-eighth New York. 

One hundred and twenty-seventh New York. 



Chap. XLVII.] COKKESPONDENCE, ETC. — CONFEDERATE. 339 

One hundred and tifty-eighth New York. 

One hundred and twenty-third New York. 

One hundred and eighteenth New York. 

One hundred and eleventh New York. 

Sixty-eighth New York. 

One hundred and thirteenth New York. 

Fourth New York. 

Seventh New York. 

Seventh New Hampshire. 

Sixth New Hampshire. 

Seventh Connecticut. 

Fortieth Massachusetts. 

Fifty-fourth Massachusetts (negro). 

Fifty-fifth Massachusetts (negro). 

Fifty-sixth Massachusetts (negro). 

Fifty-eighth Massachusetts (negro). 

Sixty-sixth Massachusetts (negro). 

Eighth Pennsylvania (negro). 

Seventeenth Pennsylvania. 

Third United States. 

Eighth United States. 

Third Rhode Island. 

First North Carolina (negro). 

Batteries : First United States, 16 ; Third United States, 12 ; total, 



28 [guns]. 



G. T. B., 

General, Commanding. 



[Indorsement on jacket.] 



Hdqrs. Dept. of S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 

Cam,p Gardner, Fla., March 7, 1864. 

Respectfully referred to the War Department for its information. 
Special attention is called t'o the communication of Col. D. B. Har- 
ris, chief engineer of this department. 

The position of Jacksonville is naturally very strong, easily made 
much stronger, and with the five gun-boats now in the Saint John's is 
susceptible of being made impregnable except by regular approaches. 

G. T. BEAUREGARD, 

General, Commanding. 



Charleston, S. C, March 7, 1864. 

General G. T. Beauregard, 

Commanding, Lake City, Fla. : 

I take for granted you want river torpedoes, and will send them 
quickly as possible. None were ready, but will be started Wednes- 
day at latest. The 32-pounder will be placed on car to-day, but car- 
riage not ready for two days. Orders given to accumulate 10-inch 
mortar shells. All is quiet in this quarter and at Hilton Head, ap- 
parently. 

THOMAS JORDAN, 

Chief of Stuff. 



340 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. (Chap. XLVU. 

Special Orders, ) Hdqrs. Military District of Florida, 

No. 1. j _ Camp Milton, March 7, 1864. 

I. Col. George P. Harrison, jr., commanding brigade, will order 
one regiment from his command to move and take position on the 
Jacksonville road as near Camp Finegan as practicable, within 1 
mile in rear of the command of Col. R. H. Anderson, to act as suj)- 
port for the cavalry, and to co-operate with him upon his order or 
request in holding his position against the enemy. 

II. In obedience to instructions from headquarters Department of 
South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, the camp now occujjied by 
this army on McGirt's Creek will be hereafter known and designated 
as Camp Milton. 

III. Lieut. Col. C. C. Jones, chief of artillery, will order one sec- 
tion of howitzers to report to Col. R. H. Anderson, commanding 
forces in the front ; also one section t)f Napoleons to report to the 
commanding ofiBcer of infantry (support ordered from Colonel Har- 
rison's brigade by paragraph I, encamped 1 mile in rear of cavalry 
force in the front). 

******* 

VII. In obedience to instructions from the headquarters Depart- 
ment of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, the Sixty-fourth 
Georgia Regiment will report to Col. George P. Harrison, jr., 
commanding brigade, in place of the Twenty-sixth Virginia Regi- 
ment, which will report back to Brigadier-General Finegan. 

VIII. Brigadier-General Finegan, commanding Sub-District No. 
2, will, in compliance with Special Orders, No. — , paragraph VI, 
department headquarters, occupy the posts from Clay Landing, on 
the Suwannee River, to Tampa Bay, on the Gulf coast, with such 
number and commands as he may think proper. 

******* 

By command of Major-General Anderson : 

WM. G. BARTH, 

Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Camp Milton, near McGirt's Creek, Fla., 

March 8, 186-i— 10 a. m. 
Brig. Gen. Thomas Jordan, 

Chief of Staff, Charleston, S. C. : 
Should enemy's movements indicate operations against Charleston 
or Savannah telegraph me i'mmediately, and call on War Depart- 
ment for loan of one or two brigades from North Carolina, whence 
part of the enemy's forces has come. 

G. T. BEAUREGARD. 



Georgetow^n, S. C, March 8, 1864. 
His Excellency Governor Bonham : 

Sir : It is a patent fact that the Confederate tax in real estate 
alone on the immediate banks of the Waccamaw, Pedee, Black, 
and Sampit Rivers, within tide water, will not fall short of half a 
million of dollars. In addition these alluvial lands, provided ade- 
quate protection against the inroads of the enemy be afforded, will 



Chap. XLVn.] CORRESPONDENCE, I^TC. CONFEDERATE. 34] 

yield breadstuffs alone sufficient for the support of 50,000 men 
Now, what protection has thus far been afforded to this region o: 
country, so capable of furnishing not only the " sinews of war," but 
what perhaps is even more essential, the means of subsistence ? Paj 
an army ever so well, if you don't feed it, there is no need for th( 
prophet's vision to foresee the length of its service. 

The protection against naval expeditions vouchsafed to us up t( 
this time consists of an earth-work, well constructed and of ampl( 
dimensions, but so feebly armed that it may be considered but littli 
better than a "scarecrow." It is well situated, too, at the gorg( 
which divides upper from lower Winyali Bay, where the width o 
the channel does not exceed 1,400 yards. Its site likewise is com 
manding, having some 20 feet elevation above the ordinary higl 
water, but were it a Gibraltar, it would be useless in a conflict witl 
plated vessels, armed as it is at present. This armament consists o: 
three (old) rifled 33-pounders and eight other guns of still smallei 
caliber. Experience has demonstrated that against iron-clads i 
would simply be a waste of ammunition to contend with such gum 
as these. It must not be supposed that we are secure against the at 
tack of such vessels by reason of the shallowness of the water a 
the bar to the entrance. Such is not the fact. It is well known tha 
the enemy has carried his iron-clads into the Stono River, and then 
is more water on this bar than on that to the Stono. Successfully t( 
combat these vessels we require the heaviest guns used in our serv 
ice ; we want the 10-inch columbiad. Give us but three of these 
and so far as the water approach is concerned, this section of coun 
try will have "adequate protection." 

The approaches by land are exceedingly defensible. Nature hai 
done mucn for us in this respect, and the engineer's art has suppliec 
Iier deficiencies in great part. One thousand men behind the in 
trenchments which have been constructed would be more than i 
match for five times their number. Is not the saving of this distric 
from the hands of the enemy worth three 10-inch guns and one regi 
ment of infantry soldiers ? The question is respectfully submitte( 
to the consideration of Your Excellency and your influence in obtain 
ing the desired means and material earnestly invoked. 
Very respectfullv, your obedient servant, 

J. H. TRAPIER, 
Brigadier- General. 

[First indorsement.] 

Executive Department, 
Columbia, March 39, 1864. 

Respectfully forwarded to the Secretary of War, whose attentioi 
is earnestly requested to the very important subject-matter of thi 
communication. 



M. L. BONHAM. 



[Second indorsement.] 



April 5, 1864. 
To Ordnance Bureau, for consideration and remarks. 

J. A. S., 
Secretary. 



342 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVII. 

[Third indorsement.] 

April 9, 1864. 
Respectfully retumeif to the Secretary of War. 
The guns can be furnished whenever definite orders are resolved 
on. General Beauregard intimates on a previous paper that he has 
no troops to defend such works. In that case so heavy an armament 
would be captured. I have written to General T. asking whether 
8-inch siege guns on traveling carriages would not answer his pur- 
pose. 

J. GORGAS. 



Navy Department, C. S. A., 

Richmond, March 8, 1864. 
Hon. William Poecher Miles, M. C, 

Richmond, Va. : 

Sir : Herewith I return the papers * left with me relative to the 
Torch. 

This boat was transferred upon the application of General Beaure- 
gard by this department to the army to be fitted as a torpedo-boat 
by Captain Lee, together with the iron necessary to shield her, and 
I will be glad to render such further aid in altering and preparing 
her for service as the materials on hand and the condition of the work 
in progress under this department will permit. 
I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. R. MALLORY, 
Secretary of the Navy. 

llndorsement.] 

Hdqrs. Dept. op S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 

Charleston, S. C, April 2, 1864. 
Respectfully referred to Commodore Ingraliam, for his informa- 
tion and remarks. 

I should be pleased for him to state also in what condition was the 
Torch when turned over to the army for the purpose indicated, in 
what condition when returned to the navy, and what amount of iron 
plating belonging to the navy, but imported by the army, was trans- 
ferred back to the navy. 

G. T. BEAUREGARD, 

General, Commanding. 



Charleston, S. C, March 8, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. W. S. Walker, 

Pocotaligo, S. C. : 
General Gillmore is reported to have left Jacksonville soon as 
General Beauregard's arrival in his front was known. Cannot your 
scouts get accurate information of what is going on on the islands 
and at Beaufort ? 

THOMAS JORDAN, 
Chief of Staff. 

*Not found. 



Chap. XLVII.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. CONFEDERATE. 843 

Headquarters District op Florida, 
Camp Milton, near Jacksonville, March 8, 1864. 
General S. Cooper, 

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond: 
General : I have the honor to report that the Florida volunteers 
in this district are at present organized into four battalions and three 
unattached companies, and to request that, as far as practicable, 
they may be organized into regiments. An application has some 
time since been forwarded to the War Department for the organiza- 
tion of a regiment by amalgamating the Sixth Florida Battalion, 
Lieutenant-Colonel Martin, seven companies, with the three inde- 
pendent companies of Captains Eichelberger, McNeill, and Reynolds, 
making ten companies, to which I would respectfully call your at- 
tention. There would then remain the following battalions : First 
Florida Battalion Infantry, Lieutenant-Colonel Hopkins, six com- 
panies ; Second Florida Battalion Infantry, Lientenant-Colonel Bre- 
vard, six companies ; Fourth Florida Battalion Infantry, Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel McClellan, five companies. 

A more efficifent organization would exist if these battalions were 
combined into two regiments, which can readily be effepted. by 
making companies from the men who might be transferred from the 
stronger companies, and I have the honor to request that I be au- 
thorized to do this, the details to be subject to the approval of the 
commanding general of the department and of the War Department. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

PATTON ANDERSON, 

Major- General, Commanding. 



Special Orders, ) Hdqrs. Military District of Florida, 

No. 2. f Camp Milton, March 8, 1864. 

in iti * * * * * 

V. Col. R. H. Anderson, commanding cavalry force in the front, 
will cause Capt. J. J. Dickison's company (H), Second Cavalry, to 
move immediately to Palatka, on the Saint John's River, and take 
position as formerly. Further instructions will be sent him here- 
. after. He will report to Lieutenant-Colonel Harris, Fourth Georgia 
Cavalry, at Waldo, and call upon him for any support needed. 
******* 

By command of Major-General Anderson : 

WM. G. BARTH, 

Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters Cavalry. Army of Florida, 

March 8, 1864. 
Capt. W. Call, 

A. A. A. G., Mil. Dist. of Florida, Camp Milton: 
Captain : I have the honor very respectfully to acknowledge the 
receipt of -the order requiring Captain Dickison to move with his 
troops to Palatka, and to make the following statement to the major- 
general commanding : 

Captain Dickison's troop was attached to Major Scott's battalion 
for special service, and is now doing important outpost duty. If 



344 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE 6A. COAST. IChap. XLVII. 

my command is weakened I must respectfully request to be relieved 
from all responsibility in the event of any surprise or disaster. I 
have now only 948 privates for duty to cover a line 9 miles in length 
from Hogan's Landing to Trout Creek, and the men and horses are 
now being worked to the utmost. My line is now thinner than I 
would like to have it, and I would suggest that, if possible, a troop 
from the Fourth Georgia Cavalry, now at Starke, be ordered to Pa- 
latka in lieu of Dickison's troop. The necessary guides could be 
furnished from Dickison's troop. 

One of my scouts, Massey, returned this afternoon from Saddler's 
Point. He reports the gun-boat that went up the river yesterday 
morning returned in the afternoon with about the same number of 
men visible on deck as when she went up. He heard from a woman 
(the mother of one of his scouts) wliom he considers very reliable, 
who is living in Jacksonville, and who came out to see him yester- 
day, that the enemy received re-enforcements on Sunday (day 
before yesterday) to the amount of two or three brigades. The 
enemy are now repairing the saw-mills and wharves and the build- 
ings in town, and have opened a good many stpres., Mrs. Seymour 
and several of the officers' wives have arrived.' She also says that 
the enemy have masked batteries in front of Three-Mile Branch, in 
front of which they have stretched wire for the purpose of tripping 
cavalry ; also that a large vessel loaded with supplies was wrecked 
coming over the bar some three or four days ago. She says the 
enemy say that the expedition was not ordered by Gillmore, but by 
Congress and the Secretary of War, and that they are daily expect- 
ing Rosecrans, when another attack or advance will be made. 
I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

R. H. ANDERSON, 
Colonel, Commanding. 

[Indorsement,] 

Headquarters District op Florida, 

Cam2J Milton, March 8, 1864. 
Respectfully forwarded, for information of general commanding. 

PATTON ANDERSON, 

Major- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Military District of Florida, 

Camp Milton, March 8, 1864. 

Officer commanding Detachment from. 

Fourth Georgia Cavalry, ordered to Clay Landing: 

Sir : The major-general commanding directs that you proceed^ 
with your detachment to Clay Landing, on the Suwannee River, and 
arrest a man named Rigdin and bring him to these headquarters. 
You will first proceed to the residence of Col. James W. McQueen, 
who will give you useful infoi-mation. You will also arrest desert- 
ers, and give such other protection to the people of vicinity as may 
be in your power while among them. You will report back to your 
command as soon as the detachment or company from No. 4 shall 
reach their station on the river, and will make a written report to 
these headquarters. 



Chap. XLVII] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. CONFEDERATE. 345 

Private A. H. Martin, of Company A, Sixth Battalion Florida 
Volunteers, is ordered to report, through Colonel Harris, to you as 
a guide. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. CALL, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Charleston, March 9, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. Thomas Jordan, 

Chief of Staff: 
General : I would respectfully call your attention to the accom- 
panying copy of communications, the originals of which I have re- 
tained. I have also sent a copy to Flag Officer Tucker. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obe'dient 
servant, 

FRANCIS D. LEE, 
Captain of Engineers. 

[Inclosure No. 1.] 

Charleston, March 8; 1864. 
Brig. Gen. Thomas Jordan, 

Chief of Staff: 

General: It is reported that on Saturday night, March 5, 1864, En- 
gineer Toombs, C. S. Navy, in charge of the cigar torpedo steamer 
David, struck an armed vessel of the enemy in the North Edisto, but 
failed to destroy her in consequence of the torpedo not exploding. 
As this occurrence may disturb the confidence heretofore felt in the 
torpedoes prepared by me, I deem it due to myself to state that 
about 10 days since I saw Engineer Toombs, and in the presence of 
Mr. Theodore Stoney distinctly told him that the torpedo then on 
the David could not be relied upon, it having been exposed for the 
last six months to every vicissitude of weather and climate. I fur- 
ther told him that I would furnish to the vessel a new torpedo, 
thoroughly tested, and that could be relied upon. Notwithstanding 
this advice, Mr. Toombs went on the expedition above reported 
without the slightest knowledge on my part, and carrying the old 
torpedo. Ujider these circumstances it is scarcely necessary to ask 
why the expedition proved fruitless. The most common precau- 
tion indispensable to the proper use of all fire-arms, i. e., not to rely 
on a charge of long standing, has been here neglected. 

With the facts as above stated it may readily be determined 
whether the disaster may be most fairly attributed to a failure of the 
torpedo prepared by me, or to a willful disobedience to common- 
sense instructions on the part of Engineer Toombs. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

FRANCIS D. LEE, 
Captain of Engineers. 

[Inclosure No. 2.1 

Charleston, March 9, 1864. 
I deem it proper for me to state that tlie above letter was sub- 
mitted to me on the morning of the 8th of March by Capt. Francis 
D. Lee, and upon its perusal I did state that the facts therein re- 



346 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

ported were correct, whereupon Captain Lee forwarded the letter 
to its destination. Upon the subject being again brought to my 
attention this day I cannot recollect in the conversation alluded to 
in the above letter that Captain Lee directly condemned the tor- 
pedo, but that he advised Engineer Toombs to use one of his new 
torpedoes that he conceived far more perfect. To the best of my 
knowledge and belief Captain Lee had no conversation with Mr. 
Toombs on the dimensions of charges of gunpowder necessary to 
obtain the best results. 

THEODORE STONEY. 

Charleston, March 9, 1864. 
As the only witness to the conversation above alluded to was Mr. 
Theodore Stoney, I deemed it proper before forwarding my letter of 
March 8 to submit it to Mr. Theodore Stoney's inspection, in order 
to ascertain if his recollection of the facts therein stated agreed with 
mine. Not until he confirmed my report did I forward the letter. 
As Mr. Stoney now believes himself in error, and as consequently I 
am not sustained in my recollection of so much of the conversation 
as refers to my directly condemning the torpedo used by the David, 
I deem it proper to withdraw so much of my letter as bears upon 
that point. 

FRANCIS D. LEE, 
Captain of Engineers. 



Charleston, S. C, March 10, 1864. 
General Samuel Cooper, 

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va. : 
The two companies, A and B, composing squadron horse artil- 
lery, commanded, respectively, by Captains Trenholm and-Magee, 
are stationed at Coosawhatchee, Third Military District, South Caro- 
lina. Aggregate present and absent, 265. 

THOMAS JORDAN, 

Chief of Staff. 



Camp Milton, Fla., March 10, 1864. 
Brigadier-General Jordan, 

Chief of Staff, Charleston: 
All quiet here. Am preparing to erect battery on Saint John's 
River, few miles above Jacksonville, to prevent enemy's tr.ansports 
passing up to operate in lower Florida. Telegraph this to depart- 
ment. Send me moss or hair saddle cloth instead of felt. 

G. T. BEAUREGARD. -^ 



Headquarters, &c., March 10, 1864. 
H. J. Leary, Esq., 

Marietta, Oa. : 
Sir : I am directed by the commanding general to inform you 
that it was the torpedo-boat H. L. Hunley that destroyed the Fed- 
eral man-of-war Housatonic, and that Lieutenant Dixon commanded 



Chap. XLVU.] OOBRBSPONDENOE, ETC. CONFEDERATE. 347 

the expedition, but I regret to say that nothing since has been heard 
either of Lieutenant Dixon or the torpedo-boat. It is therefore 
feared that that gallant officer and his brave companions have per- 
ished. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. W. FEILDEN, 
Captain and Assistant Adjutant-Oeneral. 



Special Orders, ) Adjt. and Insp. General's Office, 

No. 59. j Richmond, March 11, 1864., 

* * * * * * * 

XXVIII. Brig. Gen. N. G. Evans, Provisional Army, C. S., will 
forthwith proceed to take command of his brigade in the Depart- 
ment of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. 
By command of the Secretary of War : 

JNO. WITHERS, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Headquarters Military District of Florida, 

Camp Milton, March 11, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. Joseph Finegan : 

General : The major-general commanding directs that you have 
three days cooked and two days' uncooked rations prepared for your 
whole brigade as promptly as possible, and hold your command in 
readiness to move at a moment's notice. You will, however, report 
in person to these headquarters for specific instructions whenever 
you receive the order to move, the present being only to hold your- 
self in readiness. Ammunition will be brought up to 100 rounds 
per man, 40 in cartridge-boxes and 60 in reserve. 

WM. G. BARTH, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters Military District of Florida, 

Camp Milton, March 11, 1864. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Harris, 

Commanding C. /S. Forces, Waldo, Fla. : 
Colonel : The major-general commanding directs you to send a 
courier to Mr. Beckham, in charge of hands engaged in rej)airing 
telegraphic line to Waldo and Gainesville, with the inclosed commu- 
nication. You are notified that, if possible, instruments will be sent 
to Waldo and telegraphic communications opened to these head- 
quarters from that point on to-morrow, by which you can forward 
your communications, which require urgent dispatch. You will 
keep the commanding general constantly advised of the enemy's 
movements. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. CALL, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 



348 8. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

Headquarters Military District op Florida, 

Camp Milton, March 11, 1864. 
Col. K. H. Anderson, 

Commanding Cavalry, Army of East Florida: 
Colonel : Lieutenant-Colonel McCormlck, Second Florida Cav- 
alry, was called on some time since for an explanation relative to 
the affair at Camp Finegan. The explanation as furnished failed to 
satisfy General Beauregard, and further information as to certain 
points was called for. This has not been received, and General Beau- 
regard is very desirous that it be furnished at once. The major-gen- 
eral commanding desires that you impress upon Lieutenant-Colonel 
McCormick the necessity of his immediate compliance with the call. 
I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. G. BARTH, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters Military District of Florida, 

Camp Milton, March 11, 1864. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Harris, 

Commanding Cavalry, Waldo, Fla. : 

Colonel : Your dispatch of this day's date relative to the landing 
of the enemy at Palatka is received. I am directed by the major- 
general commanding to notify you that a brigade of infantry and a 
battery of artillery is now in readiness to move to your support as 
soon as necessity may require. Meanwhile you will watch the move- 
ments of the enemv, skirmish with him and retard his movements, 
if he moves out from Palatka toward the interior, and keep the 
major-general commanding fully informed of anything you can dis- 
cover as to his movements and intentions. In conducting this oper- 
ation you will be careful not to so weaken or contract your picket- 
lines and scouting parties as to endanger his flanks. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. G. BARTH, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Headquarters Military District of Florida, 

Camp Milton, March 11, 1864. 
Lieut. Col. C. C. Jones, Commanding Light Batteries: 

Colonel : The major-general commanding directs that you have 
a battery of light artillery put in immediate readiness to move, with 
full complement of ammunition. Three days' cooked rations and ten 
days' uncooked will be required, and prepared as promptly as pos- 
siljle. 

I am, &c., 

WM. G. BARTH, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Camp Milton, March 11, 1864. 

Capt. Daniel Bird, J. L. Simpkins, J. M. Marvin, James S. 
Russell, Robert Scott, and others, Monticello, Fla. : 
Gentlemen : Your communication of the 8th instant, in relation 

to the depredations by deserters in Taylor and JefEer.son Counties 



Chap. XLVU.] COKRESPONDENCE, ETC. CONFEDERATE. 349 

has been handed me by Mr. Simmons, and I avail myself of his 
kindness to transmit my reply. 

The main facts connected with these depredations had reached the 
general commanding and myself through him i)revious to the recep- 
tion of your communication, and such steps had been taken to re- 
press them as the means in his hands would allow. 

Brigadier-General Gardner, commanding the sub-district in which 
the operations of these outlaws have been carried on, has been in- 
structed to make use of such means as may be in his power to arrest 
them and bring them to punishment, and to use every effort to pre- 
vent the recurrence of similar acts of lawlessness and plunder. 
Troops have been placed at his disposal for this purpose. In view 
of the condition of affairs in this portion of the State the general 
commanding has not deemed it prudent to withdraw just now any 
of the troops from in front of Jacksonville for the purpose of oper- 
ating in Taylor and Lafayette Counties, but the hope is entertained 
that at an early day this emergency will have passed, and such dis- 
position of forces may be made as will give entire security to the 
regions now threatened by the deserters. 

I will not close this communication without invoking my neigh- 
bors and friends, to whom it is addressed, to preserve that 'calm 
courage and self-sacrificing fortitude in the present emergency 
which is so essential to success, and which has characterized our 
people in other regions overrun and devasted by the foe. The re- 
cent example of the civilians of Richmond flying to arms at the first 
alarm of approaching danger, marching to the front, and success- 
fully repelling a formidable organized raid upon the capital of our 
Confederacy, is not only worthy of imitation, but instructive in its 
lessons. It teaches us what a few cool and determined men can ac- 
complish when thrown upon their own resources and uninfluenced 
by panic. 

The recent raids in your immediate vicinity were doubtless so 
unexpected as to find the citizens unprepared for resistance, but 
the confident belief is entertained both by the general commanding 
and myself that any attempt at- a repetition of such outrages by a 
force of deserters so insignificant in numbers will be met by such 
vigorous resistance as will result in discomfiture and defeat to those 
outlaws and villains. 

Hoping that no emergency of the kind, however, may arise, I am, 
gentlemen, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

PATTON ANDEESON. 



Charleston, S. C, March 12, 1864. 

General Samuel Cooper, 

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va. : 
All quiet in Florida. General Beauregard proposes to erect a 
battery on Saint John's River, few miles above Jacksonville, to 
prevent enemy's transports from passing into lower Florida. Ap- 
pearances indicate re-establishment of forces of enemy in this State. 
Number of vessels at Hilton Head restored to about same as before 
movement to Florida. 

THOMAS JORDAN, 

. ■ Chief of Staff. 



350 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. ICh*p. XLVU. 

Headquaeteks Military District of Florida, 

Camj) Milton, Near Jacksonville, March 12, 1864 

General S. Cooper, 

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va. : 

General : I have the honor to report that the infantry of the 
Florida volunteers in this district is at j)resent organized into four 
battalions and three unattached companies, and to request that a^s 
far as practicable they may be organized into regiments. An appli- 
cation has some time since been forwarded to the War Department 
for the organization of a regiment by amalgamating the Sixth 
Florida Battalion, Lieutenant-Colonel Martin, seven companies, with 
the three independent companies of Captains Eichelberger, McNeill, 
and Reynolds, making ten companies, to which I would respectfully 
call attention. There would then remain the following battalions : 
First Florida Battalion Infantry, Lieutenant-Colonel Hopkins (six 
companies) ; Second Florida Battalion Infantry, Lieutenant-Colonel 
Brevard (six companies) ; Fourth Florida Battalion Infantry, Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel McClellan (five companies). 

A more efficient organization would exist if these battalions were 
combined, which can be readily effected by making companies from 
the men who might be transferred from the stronger companies, and 
I have the honor to request that I be authorized to do this, the 
details to be submitted to the approval of the commanding general 
of the department and of the War Department. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

PATTON ANDERSON, 

Major-Oeneral, Commanding. 



Headquarters Military District of Florida, 

Camp Milton, March 12. 1864. 

Brigadier-General Gardner : 

General : The report of Captain Thigpin, relative to the cases 
of William Marr and Stillman Smith, has been submitted to the 
major-general commanding, who directs that you instruct Captain 
Thigpin to notify William Budd, commanding U. S. naval forces, 
Saint George's Sound, that these men (Marr and Smith) were not 
arrested but shot while attempting, with arms in their hands, to 
escape from our troops ; that we do not acknowledge any right on 
his part to grant passes within our lines, and that any harsh or 
violent proceedings of his against either Messrs. Ormand and Rouan 
or any other persons, either military or civilians, entitled to the pro- 
tection of the Confederate States, will be promptly and sternly retal- 
iated. 

The major-general further directs that you cause Messrs. Ormand 
and Rouan to be at once arrested and removed to a safe point in the 
interior. 

I return the original papers in this case, as requested in your 
indorsement. 

I am, general, your obedient servant, 

WM. G. BARTH, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Chap. XLVU] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. CONFEDERATE. 351 

Headquarters Military District of Florida, 

Camp Milton, March 12, 1864. 

Brigadier-General Gardner, 

Commanding Sub-District, Quincy, Ma. : 

General : The commanding general is desirous of procuring a 
copy of the circular of Major White, commissary of subsistence, 
which is supposed to have attracted the attention of the enemy, 
and learning you had seen it alluded to and copied in a New York 
journal, he requests that you will procure and send to him a copy 
at this place. Also forward copy direct to department headquar- 
ters. 

All quiet here except reported landing of five Yankee regiments 
at Palatka on the lOtn instant. Necessary arrangements to [meet] 
them, should they attempt to penetrate to the interior, have been 
made. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

PATTON ANDERSON, 

Major- Oeneral, Commanding. 



Special Orders, ) Hdqrs. Military District of Florida, 

No. 5. J Camp Milton, March 12, 18C4. 

IX. The major-general commanding directs that you move with 
your regiment in advance of your present position to a point to be 
designated to you by Col. R. H. Anderson, commanding cavalry, 
which position will be in and over the railroad and plank road near 
Colonel Hart's plantation. 

X. Brig. Gen. W. M. Gardner, commanding Sub- District No. 1, 
will at once assume command of the forces guarding the railroad 
bridge over the Suwannee River, with the defense of which he is 
hereafter intrusted. Brigadier-General Gardner will make such 
disposition of Captain Wimberly's company, and the other troops 
composing the bridge guard, as he may deem most conducive to the 
public interest. 

******* 

By command of Maior-General Anderson : 

WM. G. BARTH, 

Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Camp Milton, Fla., March 13, 1864—8 a. m. 

Brig. Gen. H. W. Mercer, 

Commanding, &c., Savannah, Ga. : 

Order torpedoes replaced under range of batteries, and should any 
demonstration be made by enemy call directly on War Department 
for assistance from North Carolina, then send copy of dispatch to 
Charleston. 

G. T. BEAUREGARD. 



352 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [^baf. XLVH. 

Hdqks. Fourth Mil. District op South Carolina, 

Georgetoivn, March 13, 1864. 
General S. Cooper, 

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va. 
(Through General G. T. Beauregard, commanding Department of 

Soilth Carolina, Georgia, and Florida) : 

General : I beg leave most respectfully to invite the attention of 
the War Department to the imperiled condition of this section of 
the Confederacy, because of the exceeding poverty of our present 
means of defense, not only in material but m men. This military 
district embraces the linfe of coast lying between the North Carolina 
line on the one side and Bull's Bay on the other. Within its coast 
limits are embraced the entrances to Winyah Bay, the two Santee 
Rivers, and Bull's Bay, besides a number of smaller inlets. 

Immediately back of the coast line lies the richest belt of alluvial 
lands (all until recently in the highest state of cultivation) anywhere 
to be found in the State, stretched along the banks of the Pedee, 
Waccamaw, Black, Sampit, and the two Santee Rivers, the portals 
to all which are the entrances above referred to. It is estimated 
that the agricultural productions of this alluvial belt alone will 
subsist not less than 75,000 men, provided defenses at all commen- 
surate with its importance be afforded. In the spring of 1862 the 
almost total withdrawal of all defense led to the abandonment of at 
least three-fourths of the lands then in cultivation, the planters flee- 
ing for safety, with their slaves, far into the interior, and yet the 
product of the fourth that still remained under cultivation has, in 
spite of the adverse circumstances produced by the close proximity 
of the enemy, contributed largely to the support of soldiers' families 
in this and adjoining districts, besides helping to_ no inconsiderable 
extent to feed not only the troops in this military department, but 
those also of General Johnston's army, as I am informed. 

But it is not only as a source for furnishing subsistence to our 
armies and our people that I am impelled by a high sense of duty 
earnestly to solicit the attention of tlae War Department to this sec- 
tion of the Confederacy. Its possession by the enemy would afford 
him decided military advantages. Once firmly established in this 
town or vicinity he would constantly threaten the lines of railroad 
which traverse the country from Wilmington to Charleston and Co- 
lumbia, and to give anything like reasonable security to which 
would require live times the force necessary to enable us to hold our 
position here. 

Incidentally, it may not be amiss for me to mention that upon our 
defenses here rests the safety of the Confederate navy-yard at Mars 
Bluff. Should the enemy break through our line of defense, 50 or 
100 cavalry landed on the banks of the Pedee would in a few hour§ 
reach the navy-yard, complete the work of destruction there, and 
return without encountering any serious obstacle, because there 
would not be time to throw any in their way, if they moved 
promptly. The requisition which I have had the honor quite re- 
cently to submit for heavy guns, &c., will, I feel confident, when 
supplied, effectually close the water approach. The other avenue of 
approach is very feebly held, and it is to the alarming fact that I 
have not a single infantry .soldier attached to this command that I 
desire most especially to invoke attention. 

With a coast line to observe and guard more than 70 miles in 
length, intersected by three deep and wide rivers, my command con- 



Chap. XLVIL] COKEESPONDENCE, ETC. CONFEDERATE. 353 

sists at present of seven companies of cavalry, one battery and a 
section of light artillery, and one company of heavy artillery, show- 
ing by the latest returns a total effective present of 558 men. Five 
hundred and fifty -eight men to defend a country 70 miles in extent, 
and that country abounding in agricultural resources, besides offer- 
ing other temptations to the enemy! No argument is necessary to 
shovsr that our tenure here is most uncertain and dependent entirely 
upon the forbearance of the foe and his ignorance as to our true con- 
dition. We are here on sufferance. Upon no one point could I con- 
centrate in less than twenty-four hours, even under the most favor- 
able circumstances, more than 300 men. The main position, the 
decisive point in the field, is a very defensible one. It is strong by 
nature, and the art of the engineer has been called into requisition 
to give to it still greater strength. But material obstacles are not 
of themselves sufficient. 

I regret the necessity for this communication, but duty to the sec- 
tion of the country with the defense of which I am immediately 
intrusted, duty to our cause, and a proper, I trust, sense of my own 
responsibilities, all unite and conspire to forbid my withholding 
longer from those whose responsibilities are weightier than mine, 
though not so immediate, the statements which I have had the honor 
above to submit for their consideration. 

In conclusion, it may be proper that I should disclaim any design 
to reflect upon the general commanding the military department of 
which this district is a portion. He has repeatedly acknowledged 
the importance of the interests here at stake and the necessity of 
affording them protection, but has declared his inability to do so 
without endangering other points which he deemed more vital. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

J. H. TRAPIER, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 

[First indorsement.] 

Hdqrs. Dept. of S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 

Charleston, S. C, March 25, 1864. 

Respectfully referred to the War Department, for its favorable 
consideration. 

I fully concur in the remarks of General Trapier relative to the 
importance of this district and of its exposed condition, which will 
become still more so wlien Colonel White's cavalry shall have left 
for Virginia, as lately ordered. 

G. T. BEAUREGARD, 

General, Commanding. 

[Second indorsement.] 

Major Melton : 

Let the commanding general of the Department of South Carolina, 
Georgia, and Florida be informed that this order cannot be changed, 
and that it is for him to dispose of the force left him so as to effect- 
ually guard his most important points. 

S. C 

23 R R — VOL XXXV, PT II 



354 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [C=ap. Xl-Vn. 

[Third indorsement. ] 

April 15, 1864. 

The true solution of this matter is in a nutshell, I think. It is a 
question of relative importance of the several armies of Generals 
Lee, Johnston, and Beauregard. The department has determined 
that the greater importance, relatively, of General Lee's army re- 
quired the movement of certain forces from General B.'s command. 
This point can only be determined by the War Department from a 
view of the whole field, and the War Department has determined 
it. This force removed, it devolves on General Beauregard so to 
dispose of his remaining force as to effectually guard the most im- 
poi'tant points in his command. 

With this paper, then, the War Department has nothing to do, 
except I would respectfully suggest that General Trapier has a com- 
mand by no means commensurate with his grade. 

SAML. W. MELTON, 
Major, Assistant Adjutant-General. 



March 13, 1864^8 p. m. 

Instructions to Man. Gen. Patton Anderson : 

First. Telegraph Captain Pearson to repair by shortest route to 
Orange Springs for the protection of that point. Enemy supposed 
to be advancing up the Ocklawaha River in barges, from Welaka. 

Second. Order a train to go down for the company sent toward 
Cedar Keys, to be brought back on railroad to point nearest Orange 
Springs. They will make a forced march for the protection of that 
point from enemy's boat expedition up the Ocklawaha River. 

Third. Send by express two companies of infantry from here to a 
point on the railroad nearest Orange Springs; they will make a 
forced march for the protection of that point from boat expedition 
up the Ocklawaha River. 

Fourth. Should the enemy have reached Orange Springs before 
the forces named, the forces named will unite and march to some 
favorable point on the river where they can cut off the retreat of the 
enemy. 

Fifth. Order an intelligent and active officer acquainted with that 
part of the country to take command of the whole. 

Sixth. Order a section of light artillery to accompany the whole. 

Orders will be issued in accordance with the above notes. Order 
some of the inhabitants (by telegraph) to cut down trees into the 
River Ocklawaha, both above and below the -expedition, using their 
negroes if necessary. 

Seventh. Send to Captain Pearson the companies ordered to Bay 
Port, Wacasassee, &c. 

By command of General Beauregard : 

HENRY BRYAN, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Headquarters Military District of Florida, 

Camp Milton, March 13, 1864. 
Brigadier-General Gardner : 

General : In reply to your communication of the 9th instant, the 
major-general commanding directs me to say to you that-the exigen- 



Chap. XLVU.] COBKKSPONDENCE, ETC. CONFEDERATE. 355 

cies of the service will not at present admit of compliance with your 
request as to Scott's battalion. Capers' battalion has been ordered 
to report to you, and will obviate tlie necessity for Bonaud's battal- 
ion. A detachment of the Siege Train has been ordered to report to 
you to guard the Aucilla trestle. No troops can possibly be spared 
from this point, but the hope is entertained that with Capers' battal- 
ion, Wimberly's company, the two infantry companies at the Su- 
wannee bridge, and the (letachment of the Siege Train, you will be 
able to prevent further depredations in Middle Florida. 

The major-general commanding directs me to call your attention 
to the fact that many officers commanding detachments do not date 
their communications from any known locality, and requests that 
you will correct this evil in your district. 
Very respectfully, 

WM. G. BARTH, 
Assistant Adjutant-Oeneral. 



Headquarters Military District of Florida, 

Camjj Milton, March 13, 1864. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Harris, 

Commanding Georgia Cavalry, Waldo, Fla. : 
Colonel : I am directed by the major-general commanding to 
state for your information and guidance that in case of a general 
advance of the enemy upon our front it is very desirable to have the 
co-operation of your entire cavalry force. To accomplish this it will 
be necessary for you, upon the receipt of such information in relia- 
ble shajte, to fall back in the direction of Baldwin, either by the 
Middleburg and Baldwin road or such other road as may accomplish 
the march in the shortest time. Your forces will be expected to 
operate and unite with the cavalry force on our right wing, under 
Col. R. H. Anderson. It will be desirable that you shall not wait to 
concentrate your forces before moving, but will order those forces 
nearest to Middleburg and Baldwin to move independently and re- 
port as soon as practicable at the point named, and with the remain- 
der of the command more distant you will follow. That you may 
more readily comprehend the movement, it is explained to you that 
the cavalry forces intended to operate upon the right flank of the 
army, and with which you will unite your forces, under Col. R. 
H. Anderson, commanding cavalry, will retire, in case of the nec- 
essity referred to, from their present position by the Black Creek 
road to its crossing of McGirt's Creek, which it will defend, and if 
compelled to retire, then by sending one company down the Black 
Creek road, toward its crossing of Black Creek, to watch any move- 
ment of the enemy in that direction. He will continue to retire by 
a road leading from that road to the New River road, and then 
along its course upon the right flank of the army in the direction of 
Baldwin. The intersection of the Middleburg and Baldwin road 
with the New River road, below Low's house, near the Yellow 
Water, is the point at which you had best aim, and from which you 
can readily unite with Colonel Anderson. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. F. LAY, 
Major and Assistant Inspector- General. 



356 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XXVU. 

Headquarters Military District of Florida, 

Camp Milton, March 13, 1864. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Harris, 

Commanding Fourth Georgia Cavalry, Waldo: 
Colonel : Send by express to Major Hamilton, quartermaster at 
Gainesville, the following order for Captain Pearson, now en route 
from Gainesville to Tampa Bay, to be sent forward in liaste : 

Repair at once, by shortest route, to Orange Springs for protection of that point- 
Enemy supposed to be advancing up the Ocklawaha River in barges from Welaka. 
Other troops are ordered to co-operate with you. Communicate with and order any 
troops accessible to follow after and co-operate with you. 

By command of Maj. Gen. P. Anderson : 

WM. G. BARTH, 

Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters Military District of Florida, 

Camp Milton, March 13, 1864. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Harris, 

Commanding Fourth Georgia Cavalry, Waldo: 
Send following dispatch to Major Hamilton, quartermaster at 
Gainesville, by express : 

Order train down towards Cedar Keys to bring back by rail Captain McNeills 
company to point nearest Orange Springs, with the following order to the oflRcer in 
command : " Make forced march for protection of Orange Springs from enemy's 
boat expedition up the Ocklawaha." Captain Pearson and others will co-operate. 

By command of Maj. Gen. P. Anderson : 

WM. G. BARTH, 

Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters Military District of Florida, 

Camp Milton, March 13,J.864. 
Major Buist, 

Commanding Heavy Artillery: 
Major : The major-general commanding directs thait you order 
the detachment of 85 men under your command now at Madison to 
be armed with small-arms and posted withoiit delay at the Aucilla 
bridge as a guard for its defense, leaving the siege pieces and a STifli- 
cient number of men to guard the guns and take care of the horses 
at Madison. Major Daniels, commanding at Madison, will be noti- 
fied of the movement of these troops, and they will report through 
him to Brig. Gen. W. M. Gardner for instructions. 

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. G. BARTH, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters Military District of Florida, 

Camp Milton, March 13, 1864. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Martin, 

Sixtli Florida Battalion : 
Colonel : The major-general commanding directs that you pro- 
ceed with the troops ordered to report to you, by rail, to the point 
nearest to Orange Springs, and thence by forced marches to the 



Chap. XLVn.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. — CONFEDERATE. 357 

most favorable locality for intercepting the boat expedition of the 
enemy now supposed to be operating on the Ocklawaha River, using 
your discretion as to the details of your operations, which are to be 
directed to the capturing or destroying the enemy's expedition. 
Pearson's, Wostcott's, and McNeill's companies have been ordered 
to co-operate with you, and will be under your command whenever 
they join you, as will any other troops that may be in your vicinity. 
I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. G. EARTH, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Charleston, S. C, March 14, 1804. 
General Samuel Cooper, 

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va. : 
General Beauregard reports one brigade of enemy gone in trans- 
ports with barges to Palatka. He hopes to defeat object. Spies 
report to General Maury movement from New Orleans in force by 
sea steamers against Florida ; not very probable, but if so, of course, 
for descent on Gulf coast about Saint Mark's. 

THOMAS JORDAN, 

Chief of Staff. 



Charleston S. C, March 14, 1864. 
General G. T. Beauregard, 

Baldwin, Fla. : 
General Maury telegraphs spies report 15,000 troops sent from 
New Orleans in sea steamers for Florida — for example, 2,000 in one 
steamer drawing 18 feet of water^and that Sherman was in New 
Orleans on 4th instant ; not very reliable, I fancy. Send your saddle 
cloth by express in morning. All qtiiet. 

THOMAS JORDAN, 

Chief of Staff. 



Headquarters Third District op South Carolina, 

. Pocotaligo, March 14, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. Thomas Jordan, 

Chief of Staff: 
A boat expedition of 120 men was organized under the command 
of Captain Magee to attack the headquarters of the enemy's outposts 
on Broad River on the 11th instant. The ground was thoroughly 
scouted. No reserves or gun-boats within reach. There was every 
chance of success ; no element that I could sec of failure. Owing to 
the rawness of some of the oarsmen and some other contretemps, the 
expedition did not arrive at the east side of Broad River till 4.30 
a. m. Tide too low for the heavier boats to land and daylight 
too near for the requisite secrecy. The expedition retiirned. It is 
doubtful whether the enemy heard us or not. There was some talk- 
ing when the boats got aground. Upon a given signal by Captain 
Magee (firing of a rocket to be carried round to Port Royal Ferry, 



358 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA, COAST, fCau"- ^^™- 

by discharge of fire-arms), a feint was to be made of an attack at 
Port Royal Ferry by Captain Bachman with his battery of artillery. 
By some mistake the signal was supposed to have been made, and 
Captain Bachman opened upon the enemy's pickets between 12 and 
1 o'clock at night. The visit of the gun-boats was no doubt caused 
by this demonstration. 

From what I can learn along my line I do not believe the enemy 
are in any force. They are comparatively weak and disposed to be 
on the defensive. I will endeavor to keep up the appearance of 
strength by availing myself of such opportunities of attack as my 
scouts may develop. As you are aware, however, it is very difficult 
to get at them, with their command of the water, with the certainty 
of getting off. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, yours, 

W. S. WALKER, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



Headquarters District op Florida, 

Camp Milton, March 14, 1864. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Harris, 

Commanding Cavalry, Waldo: 
Make an immediate and careful reconnaissance of the enemy's 
position at Palatka with a view to ascertain if he is still in force 
there and report the result by telegraph. 

WM. G. BARTH, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 

N. B. — Telegraph operator at Baldwin will be on hand and pre- 
pared for prompt receipt and transmittal of dispatches both night 
and day, and will notify the operators with whom he corresponds 
throughout the district to the same effect. 
By order of Major-General Anderson : 

WM. G. BARTH, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Hdqrs. Dept. op S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 

Cami? Milton, Fla., March 14, 1 804— 1.45 p. m. 
Major-General Anderson, 

Commanding, Florida : 
General : The general commanding directs that you will cause 
the troops to be made acquainted with their positions in time, with- 
out delay. He also directs you to order your cavalry near Palatka •• 
to make a reconnaissance with a view of ascertaining if the enemy 
are still there in force. If not already done, he directs that you will 
instruct your chief quartermaster to be constantly informed of and 
report to your headquarters and to the chief quartermaster of the 
department all injuries to the railroads in your district which are 
likely to interfere with the movements of troops and supplies. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

HENRY BRYAN, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Chap. XLVH.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. CONFEDERATE. 359 

Headquarters Military District of Florida, 

Camp Milton, March 14, 1864. 
Brigadier-General Colquitt, 

Commanding Brigade : 

General : You will move your brigade to the position assigned it 

to the right of the railroad. The major-general commanding would 

call your especial attention to the necessity of requiring the strict use 

of sinks, and of adopting a thorough system of police in this camp. 

By order of Major-General Anderson : 

J. F. LAY, 
Major and Assistant. Inspector- General. 



Headquarters Third Military District, 

Pocotaligo, March 15, 18G4. 
Brig. Gen. Thomas Jordan : 

General: I have recently had closely reconnoitered, by my scouts, 
a blockader that has been lying for a year past at the mouth of the 
Ashepoo River. Private Crowel, of the signal corps, a half brother 
of Captain Hartshorne, served 9 years in the U. S. Navy. He got 
within a mile and a half of her with a tolerable glass. He pro- 
nounces her a corvette of about 800 tons burden, with four guns 
on a side — probably two more as bow and stern chasers. Top of 
bulwarks about 12 feet from water line ; complement of crew, 250 
men. Her position is half a mile west of Otter Island. This precise 

Eosition she has kept for months past. A pilot-boat is anchored a 
alf mile up the river ; it is supposed with reference to guard 
against torpedoes. 

The intermediate streams would be navigable from Charleston as 
far as mouth of Mosquito Creek by one of the Davids. Whether that 
creek would b§ navigable for such a boat at high water I am not 
sure, but my impression is it would be. This would carry her to 
Bennett's Point, the end of what is marked on the map as Bear 
Island. Coal could be brought from the Jacksonborough depot to 
this point. From this point it would be 9 miles by the channel 
between Otter Island and Fenwick's Island to the corvette. It 
would be necessary to come from Saint Helena Sound in order to 
avoid the tender on guard on the river side, and to insure greater 
secrecy by an attack from an unexpected quarter. By taking ad- 
vantage of a flood tide, she could easily get to a position of safety 
after doing her work. If the plan is considered feasible, I will have 
any further information obtained that may be considered desirable. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. S. WALKER, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



Headquarters Military District of Florida, 

Camp Milton, March 15, 1864. 
Maj. A. B. NoYES, 

Chief of Subsistence: 
Major: The major-general commanding directs that you take 
active measures to supply fpr an indefinite period at least 12,000 
troops in this district, and to keep constantly on hand not less 



360 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

than ten days' rations of meat and breadstufifs. Your supplies 
should be principally accumulated on the line .of the Peninsula 
and Georgia Railroad, between Quincy and the Suwannee River, 
most of them at Madison, Monticello, &c., only keeping enough 
on the Apalachicola River to supply the troops now there, and 
but slight supplies in South Florid^, suitable for the small forces 
in that region. To accomplish this object (the supply of the army 
in Middle and East Florida), Major Noyes will bring to his assist- 
ance such officers of the subsistence department as may be found 
in this district who are not absolutely needed on other duties, and 
also such agents as may be necessary. In selecting your assistants 
you will not employ on this service nor, except in the most urgent 
cases, interfere with such commissaries as may be properly on 
duty with troops in the field ; and in all cases where you need the 
services of an officer of your department you will make a written 
call for him through these headquarters. 

As soon as practicable you will make a return of all officers of 
the subsistence department under your control, showing on what 
duty and where they are employed, suggesting also such changes 
or modifications of their duties as you may deem advisable. You 
will hold all under you to a strict accountability in their proper 
spheres,, and will from time to time report to these headquarters 
any remissness or derelictions of duty among those charged with 
the important trust of supplying the troops. 
I am, major, your obedient servant, 

WM. G. EARTH, 
Assistant Adjutant-Qeneral. 



Headquarters Military District of Florida, 

Camj) Milton, March 15, 1864. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Harris, 

Commanding, Waldo, Fla. : 
Colonel : Your communications of this date are received and 
have been submitted to the major-general commanding. Your 
course relative to the expected raid up the Ocklawaha is approved. 
In the event of Colonel Anderson's falling back from his present 
position, you are expected to join him with all the cavalry under 
your command, including Captain Dickison's company. 

The general declines acceding to your proposition relative to 
sending your dismounted men to get horses, but will consider special 
applications in these cases. In forwarding such applications you 
will indorse your opinion as to the probability of the man's procur- 
ing a horse if the furlough is granted. 

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. G. EARTH, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Medical Purveyor's Office, 
Charleston, S. C, March 15, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. Thomas Jordan, 

Chief of Staff: 
General : Having to make a requisition in a few days on the 
medical purveyor at Columbia, S. C, for medical and hospital sup- 



Chap. XLVn.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. CONFEDERATE. 361 



plies, I have to request you will inform me of the number of men 
on the coast, along the line of the Charleston and Savannah Rail- 
road, and in the vicinity of Georgetown. 

I am, general, your obedient servant, 

THOS. LINING, 
Surgeon and Medical Purveyor. 



Charleston, S. C, March 16, 1864. 
General Samuel Cooper, 

Adjutant and Inspector General: 
Yesterday the enemy reopened on Fort Sumter, firing 143 shots 
from two 100-pounder and one 200-pounder Parrotts, wounding 5 
soldiers, not dangerously, and 1 negro, dangerously. Resumed fire 
to-day for short time. General Beauregard reports arrival of addi- 
tional troops of enemy yesterday at Jacksonville. 

THOMAS JORDAN, 

Chief of Staff. 



Camp Milton, 
Near Jacksonville, Fla., March 16, 1864 — 12.30 p. m. 
Maj. Gen. D. H. Hill, 

Charleston, S. C. : 
I regret to hear of your ill success. What do you propose doing 
now ? I cannot return as soon as I expected, and must have an 
officer in command in South Carolina. 

G. T. BEAUREGARD. 



Hdqrs. Dept. of S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 

Charleston, S. C, March 16, 1864. 
Thomas Lining, 

Medical Purveyor, Charleston: 
Sir : In reply to your communication of the 15th instant, I have 
the honor to inform you that the number of troops present and 
absent serving in the State of South Carolina is 22,750, and am 
instructed to say that your estimate for tlie medical and hospital 
supplies should be made out for that number. 
Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. M. OTEY, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Camp Milton, 
Near Jacksonville, Fla., March 16, 1864—11 a. m. 
Maj. Gen. J. F. Gilmer, 

Comdg. District of Georgia, Savannah, Ga. : 
Resume command in Georgia and Third Military District of South 
Carolina. Keep me advised of .enemy's movements. All quiet here. 
One brigade of enemy is at Palatka. Some additional troops ar- 
rived yesterday at Jacksonville. 

G. T. BEAUREGARD. 



362 S. C, FLA., ANB ON THE GA. COAST. CCbap. XLVII. 

Camp Milton, 
Near Jacksonville, Fla., March 16, 1864 — 12 m. 
Brigadier-General Jordan, 

Chief of Staff, Charteslon, S. C. : 
All quiet here. One brigade of enemy at Palatka. Some addi- 
tional troops arrived yesterday at Jacksonville. His present force 
in Florida estimated at 15,000." Place General Evans on duty, but 
order Generals Hill, Gilmer, and Trapier to investigate Ms case as 
provided by law. 

12.30 P. M. 

Should General Hill assume command in South Carolina, cannot 
Maj. Hutson Lee be assigned to him and Major Willis to depart- 
ment? I may wish to transfer my headquarters to Savannah in 
course of spring, which might not suit former. 

G. T. BEAUREGARD. 



Headquarters Military District of Florida, 

Camp Milton, March 16, 1864. 

Maj. E. C. SiMKiNS, 

Chief Quartermaster: 

Major : The major-general commanding directs that you take 
measures as promptly as practicable to concentrate enough railroad 
transportation in telegraphic reach to move a brigade of infantry 
from Baldwin to any point on the Florida Railroad where their serv- 
ices may be needed. As the concentration of the rolling-stock at 
any one point would interfere with the siipply of the troops, you 
are instructed to make your arrangements with the view of being 
able to move the troops promptly, and interfering as little as possi- 
ble with the transportation of supplies. 

By order of Major-General Anderson : 

WM. G. BARTH, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Richmond, Va., March 17, 1864. 
General G. T. Beauregard, 

Charleston, 8. C. : 
The First South Carolina Cavalry and Second South Carolina 
Cavalry have been ordered to South Carolina. The Fourth South 
Carolina Cavalry, Colonel Rutletlge, the Fifth South Carolina Cav- 
alry, Colonel Dunovant, the Sixth South Carolina Cavalry, Colonel-- 
Aiken, the Seventh Georgia Cavalry, Colonel White, the remaining 
companies of Colonel Milieu's (Georgia) battalion, and the cavalry 
companies of Captains Tucker, Wallace, Boy kin, Trenholm, and 
Magee have been ordered to Virginia, li'repare them for movement 
without delay in light marching order with their wagon trains ; the 
heavy baggage will come by railroad. Orders sent by mail. Gen- 
eral Hampton will superintend the movement. 

S. COOPER, 

Adjutant and Inspector General. 



Chap. XLVn.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. CONFEDERATE. 363 

Charleston, S. C, March 17, 1864. 
General G. T. Beatjregard, 

Tallahassee, Fkt.: 
But four monitors are off harbor ; one was taken off in tow yes- 
terday. Farragut is not in command of fleet. 

THOMAS JORDAN, 

Chief of Staff. 

Charleston, S. C, March 17, 1864. 
General G. T. Beauregard, 

Tallahassee, Fla.: 
All remains quiet. Number of vessels at Hilton Head but sixty- 
nine, of which thirty-six are schooners. General Cooper ordered 
Captain Otey to Richmond with papers to show strength of all regi- 
ments in department ; sent him to-day with the information. Am 
pushing the completion of the David torpedo-boats. Can employ 
Major Cooke here. 

THOMAS JORDAN, 

Chief of Staff 

General Orders, ) Headquarters, 

No. 6. ) Savannah, March 17, 1864. 

Major-General Gilmer resumes the command of the Military Dis- 
trict of Georgia and Third Military District of South Carolina, 
headquarters as heretofore, at Savannah. 
By command of Maior-General Gilmer : 

J. H. ALEXANDER, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Department Headquarters, 
Camp Milton, Fla., March 17, 1804. 
Maj. Henry Bryan, 

Assistant Adjutant- General : 
Major : From reports of scouts and examination of deserters, 
the following facts with reference to the movements of the troops 
of the enemy in the direction of Palatka would seem to embody the 
truth : That on Wednesday, the 9th of March, 1864, an expedition 
left Jacksonville for Palatta, consisting of two gun-boats and three 
transport steamers, having aboard about 1,400 men, constituting 
three regiments of infantry (white) and five negro companies, with 
seven pieces of field artillery, with horses, &c., but no cavalry, the 
whole force under the command of Colonel Barton. These troops 
reached Palatka on Wednesday night or Thursday morning, and on 
Friday commenced work on intrenchments and rifle-pits. One of 
the gun-boats left, whether up or down is not positively known. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Harris, on Sunday, March 13, reported a move- 
ment in the direction of Orange Springs, or Silver Springs, to meet 
which prcmpt measures were taken. This report has as yet not 
been verified, nor have we any news from the expedition. 
Respectfully, 

JNO. F. LAY, 
Major and Assistant Inspectorr General. 



364 8. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVn. 

Charleston, S. C, March 18, 1864. 

General G. T. Beauregard, 

Tallahassee, Fla. : 
You are ordered by General Cooper to send to Virginia Rutledge's, 
Dunovant's, and Aiken's regiments, and five other companies, includ- 
ing Trenholm's (South Carolina) cavalry, and White's new regiment, 
and rest of Milieu's companies, Georgia Cavalry, and in their place 
will receive First and. Second Regiments South Carolina Cavalry, 
from Virginia. Can't you guess source of this raid on your cavalry ? 

THOMAS JORDAN, 

Chief of Staff. 



Headquarters, 
In the Field, Camp Milton, McGirt's Creek, Fla., 

March 18, 1864—1 p. m. 

General Braxton Bragg, 

General-in-Chief, Richmond, Va.: 

Please read my letters of January 35 and February 5 last,* to 
Adjutant-General, and obtain action thereon. If compliance with 
requests therein contained were denied, the interests of the country, 
my own self-respect, nay,, a proper regard for my reputation, would 
require that I should ask to be relieved from the command of this 
military department. 

G. T. BEAUREGARD. 



Headquarters Department, 
In the Field, Camp Milton, East Fla., March 19, 1864. 

General S. Cooper, 

Richmond, Va. : 
Cavalry ordered to Virginia will be sent at once, although consid- 
ered indispensable to guard country and railroad from Charleston to 
Savannah and to defend this military department. Scouts near 
Jacksonville report enemy's forces reinforced by 2,500 men on 16th 
and 17th instant. 

G. T. BEAUREGARD. 



Charleston, S. C, March 19, 1864. 

General G. T. Beauregard, 

Baldwin, Fla.: 
I telegraphed you last night of orders received from Richmond of 
sweeping away four regiments and eight companies of cavalry from 
your department. It will be needless to apply, then, for delay of 
Millen's battalion. Some prominent Carolinians will interpose, but I 
doubt their success. 

THOMAS JORDAN, 
- Chief of Staff. 

*8ee Part I, pp. 543, 566 ; also Bragg's action thereon March 22, ibid, p. 571. 



Chap. XLVIl.]. CORBKSPONDENCE, ETC. CONFEDERATE. 365 

Headquarters, 
In the Field, Camp Milton, East Fla., March 19, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. Thomas Jordan, 

Chief of Staff, Charleston, S. C. : 
Send to Virginia cavalry ordered by General Cooper, and make 
best disposition meanwhile of remaining troops to meet present 
emergencies. All quiet here; 3,500 men, re-enforcements, reported 
received by enemy in Jacksonville on 16th and 17th instant. 

G. T. BEAUREGARD. 



Headquarters Department, &c.. 
Camp Milton, Fla., March 19, 1864. 
Brig. Gen. Thomas Jordan, 

Charleston, S. C. : 
Send two Napoleons and two 12-pounder howitzers for Abell's 
battery, for which requisition has been made. Send also two 12- 
pounder howitzers to substitute for one section of Villepigue's bat- 
tery. Enemy is quiet in our front and at Palatka. 

G. T. BEAUREGARD. 



Hdqrs. Deft, op S. Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 

Charleston, S. C, March 19, 1864. 
General G. T. Beauregard : 

Dear General : To-day received dispatch in answer to Long- 
street's communication by Lieutenant Goree, and have sent it on as 
directed, by telegraph.* He has sent another letter, a copy of 
which I shall send you as well as my answer thereto. 

I telegraphed last night the purport of a dispatch from General 
Cooper stripping this department of three regiments of cavalry and 
five companies from South Carolina, and one regiment and three 
companies from Georgia. I recognize Bragg's work in this. I am 
not wrong. 

I saw two of the new Davids tried in the harbor to-day with most 
. satisfactory results. Three are now ready andT am pushing them 
by goiiig to see them every day. As soon as dark nights set in they 
shall be put to work. 

Hampton is to come here to superintend the movement of the 
cavalry. If this cavalry does go to Virginia it portends another 
campaign across the border, but possibly when ready they may be 
sent to Longstreet. 

Brisk fire of enemy to-day into the city. An explosion at the 
arsenal this morning in the rocket room killed 2 and wounded a 
numbei' of persons slightly. It might have been very much worse. 

An intercepted dispatch from the fleet the otlier day showed con- 
clusively that Farragut is not in command of the fleet off this harbor. 

I have not alluded to your great bereavement, of which the tele- 

fraphic wires give us an account, which I fear is true. Words can 
o nothing to assuage such a sorrow, or fill again for you the "cham- 
bers emptied (jf delight." And I need not assure you how deeply I 
sympathize with you at such a time. 
Sincerely, your friend, 

THOMAS JORDAN. 

* See Longstreet to Beauregard, March 7, and Beauregard's reply, March 18, VoL 
XXXII, Part III, pp. 590, 649. 



366 S. C, FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. [Chap. XLVU. 

Royall's House, March 19, 1864. 
Brigadier-General Jordan, 

Chief of Staff: 
Lieutenant-Colonel Yates, commanding at Fort Johnson, reports 
that on firing the 6.40 Brooke gun at Battery Simkins to-day it 
hurst, about 15 inches of the muzzle breaking off. This gun has 
been fired between 1,700 and 1,800 times. 

JOHNSON HAGOOD, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



Special Orders, ) Hdqrs. Military District op Florida, 
No. la. f Cam}) Milton, March 19, 1864. 

I. Colonel Tabb, Fifty-ninth Virginia Regiment, will proceed to 
Waldo without delay and assume command of all the troops, either 
infantry, cavalry, or artillery, now reporting to Lieiitenant-Colonel 
Harris, Fourth Georgia Cavalry, at or near that place. Colonel 
Tabb will operate vigorously against the enemy in that section. 
He will obstruct the navigation of the tributaries of the Saint 
John's by felling timber, &c., and will use every means at his dis- 
posal to protect the region of country in which he operates from the 
incursions of the enemy. 

Colonel Tabb will communicate direct with these headquarters, 
and will promptlj^ notify the major-general commanding of all 
movements of his own troops or those of the enemy. Before leav- 
ing Baldwin he will turn over the command of his regiment to his 
second in command. 

****** ^i 

By command of Major-General Anderson : 

WM. G. BARTH, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Headquarters in the Field, 

Camp Milton, Fla., March 20, 1864. 

Maj. Gen. Patton Anderson, 

Comdg. Dist. of Florida, Camp Milton, McGirVs Creek, Fla. : 
General : Having to return temporarily to Charleston sooner 
than I had intended, I desire giving you herewith my general views 
as to future probable operations against the enemy now occupying 
Jacksonville with about 12,000 or 15,000 men, and Palatka with 
about 1,500 men, as reported by scouts, deserters, &c. Your present. J 
available forces (less than 8,000 men) are not sufficient to enable 
you to drive the enemy out of Jacksonville, fortified and supported 
by four or five gun- boats, as the place is at present. The task with 
regard to Palatka would be less difficult if you could detach on 
such an expedition to insure its success a sufficient force from the 
troops at McGirt's Creek. But this might be attended with more 
danger than the object in view would warrant. Your present de- 
fensive line in rear of McGirt's Creek a is only for a temporary 
purpose — that is, until the works around Baldwin b shall be suffi- 

a Twelve miles from Jackionville. 6 Twenty miles from Jacksonville. 



Chap. XLVn.] CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. CONFEDERATE. 367 

ciently completed to enable you to give battle at that point, with 
all the chances of success in your favor, notwithstanding the dis- 
parity in numbers. I have ordered Colonel Harris to prepare jjosi- 
tions on those works for the guns of the Siege Train and the 32- 

fiounder rifled intended for the new battery ordered on Fleming's 
sland. 
Should the enemy advance upon you from Jacksonville, you 
should retire on Baldwin slowly, drawing him after you. About 
one brigade will take position in the lines there, with some cavalry 
on the left ; the other two brigades and main body of cavalry will 
take position on the right, ready to take the enemy in flank and rear 
by advancing between the Little and Big Cypress Swamps, should he 
attack the lines in front. In the event of his again being defeated, 
he should be pursued A'igorously by the cavalry on his flanks and 
the infantry on his rear. Should the enemy divide his forces by 
re-enforcing strongly those already at Palatka, the proposed battery 
at Fleming's Island on the Saint John's should be constructed at 
once, and torpedoes put in the river so as to prevent its naviga- 
tion. Should the enemy, after fortifying strongly Jacksonville and 
Palatka, l